Vertical Speedine Adjustment

Dan Cobb

Branched out member
Location
Hoover
I picked up the vertical speedline idea here on the Buzz and it's worked great several times when I could bomb pieces down, but not tolerate them rolling down a hill, bouncing into something close by, etc. While dropping pieces of spar down a vertical speedline the other day, I felt the method I was using to move the upper anchor of the speedline down the spar was too time consuming, so I'm now planning to use this setup since it doesn't require anything new:
20210831_183742.jpg
The blue rope hanging down on the right is tail. The piece to be speedlined is clipped onto the blue rope below the screw link.

Is there something better? What do you use?
 
How are you anchoring the base? I’ve always just tied a knot at the top and anchored the base midline. Throw a rigging ring at ground level and redirect the line to a safe place for the porty, either another tree or the backside of the same tree if there aren’t other options
 

Fivepoints

Branched out member
I picked up the vertical speedline idea here on the Buzz and it's worked great several times when I could bomb pieces down, but not tolerate them rolling down a hill, bouncing into something close by, etc. While dropping pieces of spar down a vertical speedline the other day, I felt the method I was using to move the upper anchor of the speedline down the spar was too time consuming, so I'm now planning to use this setup since it doesn't require anything new:
View attachment 77722
The blue rope hanging down on the right is tail. The piece to be speedlined is clipped onto the blue rope below the screw link.

Is there something better? What do you use?
A good heavy duty steel biner would be easier to use and quicker.
 

Dan Cobb

Branched out member
Location
Hoover
I'll anchor the base with a midline basal anchor. The issue at the top is moving the top anchor down as I'm cutting off chunks. The prusik seems like it will make it faster to shorten the vertical length as I work down a spar. I'm working solo, so I'm not going to the ground to change the basal anchor. There's no portawrap involved, just the vertical speedline and slings girthed on the chunk and clipped to the speedline.
 

Dan Cobb

Branched out member
Location
Hoover
A good heavy duty steel biner would be easier to use and quicker.
I use those too, have lots of them. As shown in the picture, the screw link doesn't have to be taken on/off but once, so no big deal to me. Just pull slack through the prusik to "retreat" the top anchor point down the spar. I'll use steel biners to attach the chunk to the speedline.
 

Chris Schultz

Participating member
Location
Minturn
I picked up the vertical speedline idea here on the Buzz and it's worked great several times when I could bomb pieces down, but not tolerate them rolling down a hill, bouncing into something close by, etc. While dropping pieces of spar down a vertical speedline the other day, I felt the method I was using to move the upper anchor of the speedline down the spar was too time consuming, so I'm now planning to use this setup since it doesn't require anything new:
View attachment 77722
The blue rope hanging down on the right is tail. The piece to be speedlined is clipped onto the blue rope below the screw link.

Is there something better? What do you use?
I think this is a great concept. Easy, effective, and efficient.
 

Fivepoints

Branched out member
I use those too, have lots of them. As shown in the picture, the screw link doesn't have to be taken on/off but once, so no big deal to me. Just pull slack through the prusik to "retreat" the top anchor point down the spar. I'll use steel biners to attach the chunk to the speedline.
I think you may find it hard to undo the prusik after multiple pieces have gone down and are sitting on the ground pulling on the verticle speed line.
 

Dan Cobb

Branched out member
Location
Hoover
I think you may find it hard to undo the prusik after multiple pieces have gone down and are sitting on the ground pulling on the verticle speed line.
For sure. Especially on a steep slope, even one piece can necessitate a trip to the ground to detach and secure the piece and get the tension off the speedline. On flatter ground with a bit of slack in the speedline, I'm hoping to get 3 or 4 pieces on the ground before tending to them. A client who is willing and able to unclip the pieces from the speedline is a big help.
 

Jehinten

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
Evansville
For the top anchor, as mentioned the prussik may grab tight and be hard to move, I'd do away with it and run the rope back through the screw link. Then take a few wraps at the top to hold the load, then finish with a knot/ adjustable friction hitch/ timber hitch... the friction from the wraps will make it releasable under a load.
 

Fivepoints

Branched out member
They make a micro portawrap that might work well for this if you are using 1/2" line. I have one and commonly use it in the tree. Mostly i use it when I only have one ground guy and I can lower the pieces while he guides and lands them.
 

Dan Cobb

Branched out member
Location
Hoover
I saw something online not long ago where a guy was using a mini porty in a tree. Looked pretty sweet for the right application when you have no groundie. Dang, another item for the wish list.
 

Dan Cobb

Branched out member
Location
Hoover
To make sure I don't short rig my speedline when making the basal anchor, I'll have several feet of excess tail at the top. And the tail gets longer and longer as I'm working down the spar. Tying and untying running bowlines with all that tail is the kind of thing I'm trying to avoid. One prusik loop and one steel connector seems like a good balance between simple and quick. I'm trying to follow the KISS principle.

Working solo, I've gotten used to carrying anything I might reasonably need, so weight minimization isn't really part of my universe.
 
I saw something online not long ago where a guy was using a mini porty in a tree. Looked pretty sweet for the right application when you have no groundie. Dang, another item for the wish list.
I use my mini porty in the tree all the time. I was going to suggest that piece of equipment but thought you might be trying to avoid buying something new. Such a versatile tool though. I use it most often for butt control when I’m tip tying
 

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