Using a chainsaw to cut below wedges??

Winchman

Well-Known Member
On the Sherrrill Tree website page linked from a recent email there's a picture of someone making a cut below two wedges on a pine tree. Here's the link.
You'll need to scroll down to "Explore". There's nothing more about the photo that I can find.

Here's the picture.
2020-07-02_sherrill.png
Under what circumstances would someone be making a cut below the wedges like that? Is it just a silly photo op?
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
On the Sherrrill Tree website page linked from a recent email there's a picture of someone making a cut below two wedges on a pine tree. Here's the link.
You'll need to scroll down to "Explore". There's nothing more about the photo that I can find.

Here's the picture.
View attachment 68990
Under what circumstances would someone be making a cut below the wedges like that? Is it just a silly photo op?
I was at this shoot. It’s a legit drop. I’d never seen the technique before either, but the man running the saw is among the sharpest arborists I’ve met. It’s exactly as Benjo said. Neat trick for keeping wedges and chains separate.
 

Winchman

Well-Known Member
It's great to have someone who was there respond. Was there something unusual that called for doing it that way? Maybe a lean in the wrong direction, needing to control the drop precisely, or something else?

Was the tree being pulled with a rope higher up? You could put a lot of tension on the rope with that arrangement, and then pull the trigger by cutting the backstrap.
 

Tom Lynch

Active Member
Location
Brockville
I haven't played with this arrangement, but have seen something like it. I was working a parks project, felling hazard trees. Well, I wasn't, I was the caddy for a legend arb. He stacked wedges on pocket cuts, on a leaner, made it walk WAY off the lay. It was a low target scenario and he explained the risk of the hinge failing before gaining command. Normally would install a high rope, but this was bush work. Another 12" dead ash, he wedged right back over, opposite the lean. That small of a tree would have been a nightmare to get enough wedges in play using just the back cut.

From what I gather, it allows you to slightly preload the hinge without binding the bar. Or scrambling to stack wedges. Then once mostly cut up, you can add traditional wedges. Pound both sets to gain more control and overall force. Just make sure the slots are deep enough to not bottom out the wedges, without interfering with the cut process.
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
It's great to have someone who was there respond. Was there something unusual that called for doing it that way? Maybe a lean in the wrong direction, needing to control the drop precisely, or something else?

Was the tree being pulled with a rope higher up? You could put a lot of tension on the rope with that arrangement, and then pull the trigger by cutting the backstrap.
Honestly, I prefer wedges and hammer to setting lines when possible. As for the photo, it was meant to feature the wedges.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ATH

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
I have done similar on small backleaning trees; bore cut the tree, pound two wedges, and then cut the strap in the back so I can finish pounding wedges to push it over. Saves getting the saw stuck or sawing into the wedges.
 

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
Location
Maine Island
I used that technique last week for a dead oak with a busted top barely attached. Make sure the hinge is good, and then be farther away from the stump and not crouched over to cut the back.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
I have done similar on small backleaning trees; bore cut the tree, pound two wedges, and then cut the strap in the back so I can finish pounding wedges to push it over. Saves getting the saw stuck or sawing into the wedges.
Smallish back leaners. Backcut first, then put a wedge or 2 in and load them up. Then make your undercut and finish pounding it over... Same backcut first technique that you use when using treejacks and just like using jacks you will know soon after popping out the undercut whether its gonna go over easy, or your gonna have some work to do....
 
Last edited:

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
On the Sherrrill Tree website page linked from a recent email there's a picture of someone making a cut below two wedges on a pine tree. Here's the link.
You'll need to scroll down to "Explore". There's nothing more about the photo that I can find.

Here's the picture.
View attachment 68990
Under what circumstances would someone be making a cut below the wedges like that? Is it just a silly photo op?
Try this in a legit back leaner and be prepared for a disaster...
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
Smallish back leaners. Backcut first, then put a wedge or 2 in and load them up. Then make your undercut and finish pounding it over... Same backcut first technique that you use when using treejacks and just like using jacks you will know soon after popping out the undercut whether its gonna go over easy, or your gonna have some work to do....
I will have to try that technique, I like the sound of it. I’ve never thought of doing it that way.
 

27RMT0N

Active Member
Location
WA
It is an excellent technique I use fairly often as well, usually with tall skinny doug firs. Faster than setting a pull rope, but you have to really know and understand its limitations, like anything I suppose. Another good thing about it, is that it lets you make your backcut and get wedges in on trees that would otherwise be too small to make the face, fit the bar and follow it with wedges at the same time.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
Location
Olympia, WA
Face-cut, 1/2 back-cut, wedge, 1/2 back-cut, wedge, pound it over... Another alternative for small diameter trees.


@rico
Disaster due to inability to maximize wedging force, due to shorter lever-length (distance)from applied wedge force to hinge?




If I have a reason to bore and wedge, I'll exit from the inside outward, or accurately cut in the same plane as the bore-cut, from outside inward, allowing wedging from the rear, with Max power.
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Rico, do you have a go-to method for backleaners? I've always been a fan of setting a line but that must be unrealistic for most of your trees.
That really depends on the severity of the back-lean, and the size of the tree. If its a mild back-lean I will simply beat it over... If I am not 100% sure I can beat it over I will do whatever is needed to get a tag-line in it... If it is super ugly and my butt is puckering I will put a tagline in it and employ a tree jack.

Whichever method you are using to move back leaners, patience and attention to detail is the name of the game....
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Face-cut, 1/2 back-cut, wedge, 1/2 back-cut, wedge, pound it over... Another alternative for small diameter trees.


@rico
Disaster due to inability to maximize wedging force, due to shorter lever-length (distance)from applied wedge force to hinge?




If I have a reason to bore and wedge, I'll exit from the inside outward, or accurately cut in the same plane as the bore-cut, from outside inward, allowing wedging from the rear, with Max power.
Lets remember how we correctly use wedges to move the top of a tree multiple feet to deal with a legit back leaner... You alternate between banging your wedges and tickling your hinge, and slowly and methodically pick up/move the weight of your tree until it sits in your under cut.

How are you going to do this if a backstrap/trigger strip is still attached on the backside? You aren't...

The reason the bore/trigger strip method works well on trees with a heavy head lean is the very reason it doesn't work on trees with a real back-lean..
 
Last edited:

New threads New posts

Kask Stihl NORTHEASTERN Arborists Wesspur TreeStuff.com Kask Teufelberger Westminster X-Rigging Teufelberger Tracked Lifts Climbing Innovations
Top Bottom