Update on double-eye ended lanyard

moss

Been here a while
Demo'ing an update on my double-eye ended short lanyard. After nicking too many strand bundles on two (!!!) of my double-eye ring short lanyards with my hand saw in the last couple months I sewed one up which uses a recessed head stainless bow shackle instead of an alloy ring in the second eye position. The shackle functions equally well as a ring but is removable (on the ground not in the tree, too much fiddling, not practical) so if I require a cleaner end lanyard with just a carabiner on the end eye I can do that. The weight of the shackle is excellent for flipping the lanyard as you can imagine.

Second part of the video is demo'ing setting up and retrieving the integrated canopy anchor utilizing the double eye and slic pin bow shackle on the end of a main climbing line. You might notice that the carabiner and shackle positions can be swapped for a more effective pulldown for certain situations


-AJ
 
Andrew, may try making one this winter - BTW thanks again for the stitching instructions (on another thread) - climbing this summer on two of my homemade sewn eye lanyards and they are stable like rock. Great way to spend a -35 DegC day in the winter by the bench.
 

moss

Been here a while
Andrew, may try making one this winter - BTW thanks again for the stitching instructions (on another thread) - climbing this summer on two of my homemade sewn eye lanyards and they are stable like rock. Great way to spend a -35 DegC day in the winter by the bench.
Now that I have a helmet cam again, figured out a simpler way to prepare the “join” to sew, no more clamps etc, will record it when I can.
-AJ
 

Zebco Kid

New member
Location
Novato
Demo'ing an update on my double-eye ended short lanyard. After nicking too many strand bundles on two (!!!) of my double-eye ring short lanyards with my hand saw in the last couple months I sewed one up which uses a recessed head stainless bow shackle instead of an alloy ring in the second eye position. The shackle functions equally well as a ring but is removable (on the ground not in the tree, too much fiddling, not practical) so if I require a cleaner end lanyard with just a carabiner on the end eye I can do that. The weight of the shackle is excellent for flipping the lanyard as you can imagine.

Second part of the video is demo'ing setting up and retrieving the integrated canopy anchor utilizing the double eye and slic pin bow shackle on the end of a main climbing line. You might notice that the carabiner and shackle positions can be swapped for a more effective pulldown for certain situations


-AJ
Hello Moss,

I really enjoy the versatility you incorporate into your lanyard. I recently built a 22' Double ended lanyard setup, which includes a ISC snap on one end, a hitch climber pulley and prusik, and a carabiner on the other end. Really fun to use for shorter moves in the canopy. I would like to incorporate your double eye. I searched for your sewing instructions, but no success. Would you be able to share them with me (us)? Thank you. ZK
 
I really like that double-eye for choking on smaller diameter. I am thinking an alternative construction could be one long eye-splice with the openings for the carabiner and shackle created by seizing between them.


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Burrapeg

Been here a while
Location
Puget Sound
Now that I have a helmet cam again, figured out a simpler way to prepare the “join” to sew, no more clamps etc, will record it when I can.
-AJ
When I worked at sewing my own loops after seeing yours, I held the loop together at first with a couple of quick constrictor knots top and bottom, of small thread. Just sewed right across them with the bigger, proper thread.
 

moss

Been here a while
Hello Moss,

I really enjoy the versatility you incorporate into your lanyard. I recently built a 22' Double ended lanyard setup, which includes a ISC snap on one end, a hitch climber pulley and prusik, and a carabiner on the other end. Really fun to use for shorter moves in the canopy. I would like to incorporate your double eye. I searched for your sewing instructions, but no success. Would you be able to share them with me (us)? Thank you. ZK
I’n making some revised sewing documentation, improved and simplified some steps, will post soon, thx!
-AJ
 

moss

Been here a while
Hello Moss,

I really enjoy the versatility you incorporate into your lanyard. I recently built a 22' Double ended lanyard setup, which includes a ISC snap on one end, a hitch climber pulley and prusik, and a carabiner on the other end. Really fun to use for shorter moves in the canopy. I would like to incorporate your double eye. I searched for your sewing instructions, but no success. Would you be able to share them with me (us)? Thank you. ZK
When I worked at sewing my own loops after seeing yours, I held the loop together at first with a couple of quick constrictor knots top and bottom, of small thread. Just sewed right across them with the bigger, proper thread.
Excellent
 

moss

Been here a while
Thank you.

ZK
Here are the basic materials and techniques. As mentioned working on a more comprehensive video tutorial.

No longer using clamps, will update with easier technique.

And the disclaimer:
You are responsible for your own life and safety. This is a skill to be developed over time with practice. Not for everyone, takes a long time, requires patience, it is a craft that requires attention to subtle details. Have your work break tested to objectively assess the quality of your work.

This group of photos includes the needle and thread spec, and show how I wax the thread.

Some more photos:

First step is form the eye around a carabiner to determine how tight you want the eye. Vinyl tape the throat of the eye with multiple wraps to hold the eye position solidly and exactly. Take care to line up the cordage so you’re not building twist into the eye. Take the biner out and tape the eye down tight, using “normal” vinyl electrical tape create additional sections of wrap the length of what your sewn area will be 1.75 inches and beyond that. As you add taped wrap sections continue to keep the two legs of the join aligned and straight. I clamp the taped eye down and put tension on the cordage while i’m forming the “stacked” tape wraps. Wrap your tape tight to pre-compress the two legs of the join together. Leave some extra length on the “short cord” join side. You’ll trim that down with a hot knife later after the stitching is complete.

Wax approximately 11.5 feet of the thread specified in the photo documentation to create a 3-pass stitched join 1.75” long. Read the Speedy Stitcher documentation (search for it online if you don’t have the hard copy) to learn how to form a lock stitch with a sewing awl/chuck with needle mounted.

Take off the first tape wrap just below the eye, start creating lock stitches with a sewing awl on the edge of the tape you wrapped around the eye. Take tape wraps off as you sew, place the needle tip dead center width of the cordage and try to keep needle straight up and down as you push tbrough First pass is an open basting stitch roughly 45 degree angle zig-zag pattern. Tighten each stitch with balanced force, move the needle up the thread out of the way, pull on the top and bottom side thread at the same time. I wrap vinyl tape lightly on the ring and baby finger on each hand. Over the entire sewing process the thread will otherwise cut into your fingers. After you tighten a stitch grab the thread on the “top” side of the join close to the cordage and roll your fist against the cordage, you are burying the lock on the back stitch 2-3 millimeters, doesn’t have to be exact, you’ll get a feel for it. If you pull the lock through the cordage, retighten the stitch, pull the lock back into the cordage.

Second pass is similar to the basting stitch, place the needle dead center width of the cordage. The first pass will have compressed in the cordage and will be slightly inside the dead center mark, this is all by eye, good enough, you don’t need to measure for needle insertion locations. Place the second pass stitching equal space between the first pass.

For the last pass lay each stitch next to the last. Cordage is getting very tight and it may be difficult to push the needle through, rotate the awl needle back as you push and you won’t break needles. I like to go slightly outside dead center of the cordage for the last pass. When you reach the end, thread the bottom end thread back through to the top side, tie a square knot on the top side of the join, trim the tails of the square knot to about 8” then use the awl needle or any large sailmaking needle to put the thread tails back through to the bottom side slight space away (a few millimeters) from the last stitch, trim each tail to about 5 mm melt a bead on the end with a lighter, compress straight down with your thumb to lock the thread tail against the surface of the cordage.

There‘s more to it, working on the vid.
-AJ
 
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Burrapeg

Been here a while
Location
Puget Sound
Beautiful work, A.J. Love the second batch of photos. Practical stuff but with you it has also become art and a pleasure to look upon..
 

Jonny

Been here a while
Location
Buffalo
Really well done. I may build one, I like the looks of it.

I’m thinking 1/2” Stable Braid with a 4” spliced eye that captures the ring and ISC snap, then I’ll hand sew to separate them so they’re set up like yours.
 

moss

Been here a while
Really well done. I may build one, I like the looks of it.

I’m thinking 1/2” Stable Braid with a 4” spliced eye that captures the ring and ISC snap, then I’ll hand sew to separate them so they’re set up like yours.
Yep, for climbers who use snaps a ring or shackle (better because you can add in or take it out) give you a solid choke option.
-AJ
 

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