Tree top camping

Pumkin

New Member
Location
USA
Hey all, im looking to do some canopy hammock camping this spring/summer. Does anybody know of any resources on setups?
 

Tuebor

Well-Known Member
Location
Here
Follow Chris Coates on Facebook. He's been sleeping his was across the country in a different tree every night.
 

Pumkin

New Member
Location
USA
Hes what got me going on the idea! Some of his posts he has like 4 hammocks on one line over a large span i was looking for some knowledge on the forces and does and donts
 

moss

Well-Known Member
Hes what got me going on the idea! Some of his posts he has like 4 hammocks on one line over a large span i was looking for some knowledge on the forces and does and donts

He's posted a lot on FB about the work he and Joshua Burr have done with testing loading at anchor points and optimal methods for anchoring support lines etc. Basic story as you probably know loading up a "horizontal" line puts significant force multiplication on the anchor points.
-AJ
 

moss

Well-Known Member
Strong trees and strong lines will hold puny humans (the short version).

Joshua Burr has a neat line attachment method where he wraps the line multiple times before locking it off. The load is distributed into the coils/trunk/limb friction, no weak point created by a sharp bend in the rope.
-AJ
 

Tuebor

Well-Known Member
Location
Here
Strong trees and strong lines will hold puny humans (the short version).

Joshua Burr has a neat line attachment method where he wraps the line multiple times before locking it off. The load is distributed into the coils/trunk/limb friction, no weak point created by a sharp bend in the rope.
-AJ
Tensionless hitch.
 

dmonn

Well-Known Member
Location
Mequon
Strong trees and strong lines will hold puny humans (the short version).

Joshua Burr has a neat line attachment method where he wraps the line multiple times before locking it off. The load is distributed into the coils/trunk/limb friction, no weak point created by a sharp bend in the rope.
-AJ
In the 1980s I did some caving with a guy who refused to tie a knot in his rappelling line. All he did was wrap the excess line around a tree several times, then drape the rest of the coil of line over the part of the line that dropped into the cave. I was skeptical at first, but then we marked where the two parts of the line crossed. After a bunch of us went up and down the line in and out of the cave, we checked the markings. The crossing point had not shifted AT ALL. He had some rule of thumb he used for how many feet of wrapping around a tree for how many feet of rope in the cave, and how much residual coil you needed to weight things down after crossing over the tensioned end. He seemed to know his stuff.
 

Dan Cobb

Well-Known Member
Location
Hoover
I did that once by accident. With a group at Natural Well (186') in Huntsville. I rigged the rope with a tensionless wrap, tied a figure 8 on a bight went to go get a carabiner to clip the 8 to the standing line, but got distracted. Quite a few rappels and climbs; rope did not move.

Unless I can visually verify the rope is on bottom, I always tie a knot in the tail of the rope to prevent rappelling off the end. Preferably, a knot with a big loop so it can be untied and give you some rope below your descender to attach your ascenders.

Several years ago, a woman from Georgia rappelled off the end of a pigtail at Steven's Gap (142'.) She got on the pigtail instead of the main line for a rappel. IIRC, she was president of her Mensa chapter.
 

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