Tree Species Failure Profiles

JD3000

Most well-known member
Any good resources out there?

How about northern/northeast/midwest in particular?
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Well, U of C has their database but apparently the international one is no longer online. (?)

Hoping maybe some universities have something out there on either paper or the Goreweb.
 

CutHighnLetFly

Well-Known Member
We did a small research project after a heavy snow storm that happened in October when the trees had leaves in western mass when I was in school. There was a ton of damage, it wss really neat to see how different species handled it.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
That is also going to be a little deceptive to Midwest trees, Different species of oaks with entirely different form. I'm assuming there are also quite a bit of failures associated with Sudden Oak Death?? It also goes my number reported...doesn't relate it back to a percentage of the total population.

For example, if I told you that more white colored cars are in fatal accidents every year than purple colored cars (I'd bet the farm on it), does that mean that purple cars are safer? Of course not...it is reflective that 1:5 cars on the road are white while less than 0.5% are purple.

So, in CA: does more oaks failing mean that they are weaker trees than Eucalyptus? I doubt it.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
It is certainly not an exact transfer to trees, but it is a starting place... The USFS Wood Handbook: Wood as an Engineering Material has strengths listed by species for LUMBER at 12% MC. This is obviously not the same as trees. Other factors come into play in the landscape. Branching angles, for one, will make a huge difference. Regardless of how strong the wood is, bad branching angles will lead to more failures. But we all know that is not a perfect predictor either because Zelkova, for example, can have miserable angles yet stay together while Pear and Silver maple that look just like it will get blown to pieces.

Anyhow, in the book see chapter 4. Especially Table 4-3 starting on page 79.
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Right right. I took statistics once upon a time too...

I like collecting, organizing, and hoarding information.

Also mold, spores, and fungus.

Looking to combine the non-existing species profiles with commonly found decay fungi and combine them.
 
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treehumper

Well-Known Member
We've only cared about the strength properties or failure profiles of wood once we use it as a resource. In it's natural state its just been so much stored lumber.
 
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Ryan Keats

Active Member
I've been debating making my own data base for this as well. It's helpful for reports, etc. It's just time consuming and you often times find conflicting information.
 

benny360

New Member
Interesting, there's a good bit of info on different species and their likelyhood of failure in 'Principles of Tree Hazard Assessment and Management'
 
The ANSI BMP for Tree Risk Assessment I think stated that you can go to a website, “did not work” to find a list, or contact your local chapter.
 

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