Tree in need of Cabling We survived the Derecho

cathyfromcoralville

New Member
Location
52241
Hello I am a brand new member. Please pardon me if this is the wrong venue, but I'm getting a little desperate. I have a red bud tree that initially I thought made it through the storm without damage (other than branch loss.) Last evening I realized that there was some damage to the trunk and it desperately needs attention. I don't know if it can be saved, but definitely needs cabling to survive.
I had spoken to someone earlier this year about having it cabled, but he never returned.
I have attempted to contact several arborists but they are incredibly busy (and i'm sure this is a low priority.)

Is there anything I can do to support my tree until a professional can look at it? (I anticipate it could be a month before it can be seen)
 

oldoakman

Well-Known Member
Location
Alorgia
Photos would help 1000%, Approximate size of the tree and branches involved would also be of benefit. Basically anything that can be installed temporarily to limit movement until a more permanent solution is installed will be beneficial.
 

cathyfromcoralville

New Member
Location
52241
Yes--I plan on taking some pictures tonight (too busy cutting up other branches last evening) and when I noticed the damage, it was getting dark. Tree is ~15-16 yrs old, maybe 15 ft max. Three main "sections" of the trunk/main branches.
I have posted a photo below I took before I knew there was damage. Not sure you can see but at the crotch of the tree, there is a small willow branch w leaves. there is damage just below--there is a horizontal "crack" in the trunk. Will take a better picture this evening.
 
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Benjo75

Well-Known Member
Location
Malvern
I didn't know Stonehenge was in Iowa. Lol. Looks like it's going to need cabling back together. The right fork might be ready to fall. If it's 15 ft tall it will probably need cabled at about 10 to 12 ft high. I don't recommend getting on a ladder to do that. If you really like the tree Id try to find a certified arborist to look at it and recommend a fix. I'm sure they're pretty busy right now. Looks like there is a substantial crotch within reach from the ground with a little throw skill. If it were mine I might put a couple of ratchet straps around it for a temporary fix to try to pulk the forks back together. But every fix I've seen a homeowner perform has done little to no good and sometimes even made it worse. Different pics will help. I'd keep the tourists out from under it til it's been fixed though.
 

DSMc

Well-Known Member
Location
Montana
It looks like the three main limbs are evenly spread. For a 'temporary' fix, just run a rope or strap around all three and tighten as best you can. It will need to be above secondary forks to keep it from sliding down.
 

cathyfromcoralville

New Member
Location
52241
It looks like the three main limbs are evenly spread. For a 'temporary' fix, just run a rope or strap around all three and tighten as best you can. It will need to be above a secondary fork to keep it from sliding down.
Thank you. Should we wrap the rope or strap around each of the branches?
 

DSMc

Well-Known Member
Location
Montana
It would be better if you can get the rope or strap to stay put by using another side limb to keep it in place. This is a restrictive, temporary, restraint already, so do just enough to give the split support until it can be addressed properly.
 

cathyfromcoralville

New Member
Location
52241
It would be better if you can get the rope or strap to stay put by using another side limb to keep it in place. This is a restrictive, temporary, restraint already, so do just enough to give the split support until it can be addressed properly.
I am so unfamiliar with the language here, I have to clarify. (and I appreciate everyone's patience.) I don't want to do any further damage! And since I am at work, I can only imagine the process. I'm not sure how to use "another side limb to keep the strap/rope in place". In my brain, the only method i can picture is to wrap each "main limb" once with the strap, above above a secondary fork. Does that make sense?
 

DSMc

Well-Known Member
Location
Montana
You will be threading the rope through each limb fork, not wrapping it around each limb.

Because it is temporary, it does not really matter how it gets done. Just that it supports the crack until it can be properly addressed.
 
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colb

Well-Known Member
Location
Florida
Consider using three wratchet straps - one extending from each branch - attached to a central hub ring (e.g. 1/2-inch-diameter steel with a diameter that exceeds the width of the three wratchet straps added together), then snug them up so they are taut, but not tight. Note that an arborist would do things differently (splice a flat hollow braid synthetic cable onto a Fiori ring hub or something similar...), but you can make something very functional if you wish to. Main thing is to monitor it and adjust the straps yearly or so. You don't want the straps cutting or growing into the branches. Also, there is an ANSI A300 standard for supplemental support. It is a chore to read for a nonprofessional, but the accompanying Best Management Practices booklet is readable and you might enjoy understanding the concepts more. Both publications are pretty cheap.
 

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