Tree Climbing on DIY Network

arborpatrol

Active Member
Last year the crew in Central Park, NYC filmed an episode of "Project Extreme" for the DIY Network. The series is finally airing. I watched it the other day and thought it wasn't too bad. As the supervisor and the guy who spoke the most on camera, I would love to hear opinions about the show.

Enjoy,

Josh
 

jerseygirl

Active Member
Some of us (ME) are underprivileged and do not have television service of any type.

Do you have a link, a network, a timeslot - anything to point to deprived person to the show?

thanks

jz - on a mountian in the south with squirrels
 

easyphloem

Well-Known Member
Hi Josh,


I saw the program last week. I thought it was well done! I was so excited to see foot-locking on TV and a Treemotion saddle!

I called my fiance into the room to see it on TV, and she was all "no big deal", but I knew it was different than the usual blurb on climbing.

I was concerned about letting the host use the climbing saw, which he did end up using one-handed (probably due to his fatigue level). I cringed as I watched it, knowing what could happen, but happily watched the limb fall below and get lowered safely to the ground.

It looks like you have an expert crew there in Central Park. I would love to be a ground-man for you as a work-vacation.


SZ
 

TreeDr

Active Member
I tivo'd it and it was great. Good job. It looks like Cameron slept well that night. "This is the real deal"
 

NeTree

New Member
One-handing a saw isn't a big deal.. they're designed for it.

I do wonder about the show's description...
"Too tall for a crane, Central Park's tree crew challenges Jason Cameron to climb the trees using spikes and rope"

Were the spikes really necessary? Mind you, I haven't watched the video.
 

treehumper

Well-Known Member
If the show description is correct then no he didn't need spikes, in fact, he should not have been spiking since it was a pruning job.

More of the same junk TV.....
 

easyphloem

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
One-handing a saw isn't a big deal.. they're designed for it.



[/ QUOTE ]


That is true, they are designed to be held with one hand on the top, and if a pro decides it is OK to make a one-handed cut, then by all means, cut away.

My point is that this greenhorn, who used up almost all of his strength getting to the working point, was not in a position that I would call "safe" to one-hand that chainsaw.

If I recall, the spikes were only used during the removal, in the rain.


SZ
 

arborpatrol

Active Member
I am glad those who saw the show enjoyed it.

There were a few misleading bits on the show. We spent one day in the bucket truck (most of which did not make the show). We spent another day climbing and pruning in a large American elm. Finally, we spiked up a dead pin oak tree and removed several limbs. None of the trees were too tall for a crane. Perhaps they meant too tall for a bucket truck.

Everyone was tied in at all times. I was right next to Jason (the host) when he took his hand off of the saw. I thought about saying something, but thought it would be best to let him finish the cut first. The bar was clear of anything that might have caused it to kick, and I don't really like to stop someone in the middle of a cut unless it looks like something really bad is about to happen.

It was difficult finding trees that were accessible to the bucket truck (to use for filming), suitable for two people to climb in, and had significant work to show on film. We used the dead pin oak because it satisfied all the requirements and only died earlier that month. We were very selective in what we allowed Jason to do. Every cut he made was rigged so that the branch would immediately swing away from him. However, I will admit that I would never have put a new employee in those situations. Jason and the show's producers wanted to get him as involved as possible. We really had to walk the fine line between safety and excitement.

The "chipper of death" was a brand new Vermeer BC1800XL with all the new safety features. I don't know where they got that name from.

Josh
 

treehumper

Well-Known Member
Good to hear that behind the scenes there was some precautions exercised. Definitely have to watch this soon!
 

TreeDr

Active Member
Did you get paid to do the show? I dont want to know how much, but did they give you anything? Just curious. You did a great job BTW.

Trevor
 

arborpatrol

Active Member
For those who don't have the DIY Network (me included, I had to watch the show at my father's house), I noticed that DIY is showing episodes of the series online. I did not see the Central Park episode up yet, but I imagine it should be there soon.

As for getting paid, the answer is "no". We spent three 9 hour days filming with virtually no breaks. Somehow, we were able to spend that much time filming without getting too backed up with our work schedule. It amazes me that all that time only amounts to twenty-something minutes on air.

I am not even sure how the show's producers even got our contact info. Central Park does get a good share of media attention, but this was definitely more than normal.

Josh
 

Jeremy9

Member
Nice work Josh. I think the show turned out pretty good. It looked like a lot of fun. Hope to see you in Rochester this January.
 

Tucker943

New Member
It was AWESOME to see some professionals using pro gear, and pro techniques. I was yelling for my wife to come in the room and of course all I got was ..."Yeah I see, he's climbing a tree"
 

JJackson

New Member
Finally saw this episode, great work, guy must be a quick learner. My wife asked if that is what I do, I had to say no, I only climb for training and the odd "fun" at work. My friend also saved it on his tv so he could watch it. Still need to get him up in a tree on a nice day.
 

Keith

Member
[ QUOTE ]
It was AWESOME to see some professionals using pro gear, and pro techniques. I was yelling for my wife to come in the room and of course all I got was ..."Yeah I see, he's climbing a tree"

[/ QUOTE ]

I get that 'that's nice honey...' w/o even looking up crap all the time.
 

mdvaden

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
It was AWESOME to see some professionals using pro gear, and pro techniques. I was yelling for my wife to come in the room and of course all I got was ..."Yeah I see, he's climbing a tree"

[/ QUOTE ]

That reminds me of playing soccer. On TV is looks like just some game with people moving slowly across a field.
 

treehumper

Well-Known Member
Thanks for posting the time Scotty.

I saw from the point just before the pin oak climb. Best showing of arborist's at work so far. PPE, safe practices with some minor exceptions and the host really emphasized the challenges and dangers of the job. Ok, maybe overemphasized but, better that then the opposite. The spiking was on the oak removal and they even through it a pop up that reinforced using gaffs only on removals.

He was really only driving home the accident statistics with chippers not suggesting that this particular chipper was more dangerous than others.

Well done Josh!
 
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