Tips and Tricks

Zebco Kid

New member
Location
Novato
Fantastic! It appears that there are no classes scheduled. I would definitely travel to a class. Road trip! Any other classes/schools/instruction that someone can recommend? Thank you.

ZK
 
Last edited:

Treezybreez

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
Lancaster, SC
Fantastic! It appears that there are no classes scheduled. I would definitely travel to a class. Road trip! Any other classes/schools/instruction that someone can recommend? Thank you.

ZK
Wesspur has some good YouTube videos on splicing. Lookup class one double braid eye splice and 16 strand eye splice. I just use home made wire fids for everything. You can look up a fid lengths on Sampson's Fid Length Chart .
 

SeanRuel

Branched out member
Location
Portland
I'd virtually guarentee there is a splicing class in the bay area. think nautical, double braid is double braid regardless of its use
 
Also I found this video series very helpful. Well worth 50 bucks. You can stream them any time and watch over and over.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Location
West
Gotcha, thanks. Makes the most sense to me (now) thinking of it in terms of the climber unweighting him/herself by the amount of force he/she is pulling, plus getting double that on the harness pulley for a total 3X advantage.

But it's only a 2:1 if a groundie, squirrel or raccoon pulls it for you!
No,it depend what point moving.
1 SRT line with TIP in a tree.
2:1 MA
2 Horizontal set-up.Try to pull tree.TIP moving,second point -not
In result 3:1 MA
 

Dan Cobb

Branched out member
Location
Hoover
No,it depend what point moving.
1 SRT line with TIP in a tree.
2:1 MA
2 Horizontal set-up.Try to pull tree.TIP moving,second point -not
In result 3:1 MA
I think you fell into the same trap as I did initially.

In your scenario #1, the system is only generating 2:1 MA. However, if the (moving) climber is pulling the system, his/her effective weight is reduced by the amount of the pull force, resulting in an effective 3:1 system. Having the (moving) load exerting the pull force is unusual for a standard MA system.

A slightly different way to look at it is the climber essentially has 3 legs of rope attached to him/herself: the tail of the rope they're holding, plus 2 legs of rope in the harness attached pulley. Each leg will have the same tension, so the (hand held) tail of the rope only sees 1/3 of their weight - an effective 3:1.

If someone else pulls the system, the climber then only has 2 legs of rope attached and it's 2:1.

In scenario #2, you essentially have a classic 3:1 z-rig.
 

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