Tips and Tricks

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
When I travel with a lot of gear the best thing that I've found was a hard shell golf club 'suitcase'. It's tall enough to hold my 4' poles for Big Shot and I take the head off my Silky pole saw to fit inside. It's big enough to limit me to 50# of gear too. Easy to load, strap shut and tough enough to take abuse by baggage handlers.

I don't know this for a fact but I think that it doesn't get opened as often as a duffle bag or soft luggage. This is based on how often I'd get the paper flier from TSA with different luggage choices.

Don't pack throwbags in the bottom. TSA will have to dig to the bottom to find them and might loose gear or not repack carefully.

Best travel tip---> Put in a printed arbo gear catalog right on top.
 

Richard Mumford-yoyoman

Been here a while
Location
Atlanta GA
[ QUOTE ]


Don't pack throwbags in the bottom. TSA will have to dig to the bottom to find them and might loose gear or not repack carefully.


[/ QUOTE ]

They look for and find my throw bag EVERY TIME (carry on), the small beads are possible components for an improvised explosive device.
 

boreality

New member
Location
boreal forest
There was a thread about this a couple years ago. The winners I took from that was to coil rope from the middle of the length. Twice as fast and feeds out with less chance of tangles. Also putting a crazy carpet(thin stiff plastic sheet) in the rope bag prior to refilling.

My latest trick is wood ash under your tires when stuck in the snow. It works like a miracle, even mixed in loose snow. It doesn't take that much either. My Dad used to keep a bucket of it in the vehicle. Frickin near magic traction.
 

Merle Nelson

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
boreality, your tips sound promising and I want to try them. When you say “coil rope from the middle” are you referring to coiling in a hank? Also thin plastic sheet in rope bag? A certain way or just lining the rope bag with a plastic bag would get what you want? Thanks in advance. I’ll send off the wood ash trick to family in snow country.
 

boreality

New member
Location
boreal forest
When your coiling up rope hand over hand with arm lengths start in the middle of the length. The plastic trick would work say with cardboard, it just wouldn't last. It's to stand the bag up and hold it open.
 

southsoundtree

Been here a while
Location
Olympia, WA
If you tape the saw hook on your harness open, you can keep a hold on the handle and set it on your hook with one hand, then pick it back up with one hand by the handle. This is most useful for a top-handle saw.

I used to do a lot more setting the chain brake or shutting the saw off, tossing it into the air with my right hand, and grabbing it by the lanyard at the big ring (with my right hand), which I could then push onto my gated hook. I could also pick it up with one hand at the lanyard, but then had to swing it up to my left hand.
 

aaronf

Participating member
This tip brought to you by Derrik Martin....When redirecting a single line, use a munter hitch on the biner. This dosent allow the climbers weight to pull branch unions together or apart. rope then acts like a brace. a definite game changer...allowing you to redirect into much smaller limbs.
 
[ QUOTE ]
This tip brought to you by Derrik Martin....When redirecting a single line, use a munter hitch on the biner. This dosent allow the climbers weight to pull branch unions together or apart. rope then acts like a brace. a definite game changer...allowing you to redirect into much smaller limbs.

[/ QUOTE ]

Good tip but I would recommend a clove over a munter, the munter is commonly used to feed slack with added friction. a clove will hold solid.
 
I like to give my hand saw a tap on my scabbard before I put it away, helps to clear the excess shavings out. Forgot to do it once and my hand slid down the saw and cut my finger, there was a small piece of bark lodged in a tooth that prevented to saw from going in the scabbard.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
George,

Many years ago I had a saw scabbard fill with sawdust and chips. It filled so slowly that I didn't notice it until I realized that the handle wasn't seating into the molded part of the scabbard. I had to use a hacksaw blade to clean out the debris that was packed down in the tip.

My solution was to take my handsaw, lay it on top of the scabbard, then mark where the tip of the saw would be inside the scabbard. Once I had that mark I took a hole saw and drilled as large a diameter hole in the outside of the scabbard as I could without cutting the stitching. The hole was centered on the saw tip. After that...no sawdust jams.

When I got my first Silky I did the same with the plastic scabbard.
 
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JontreeHI

Branched out member
Location
Portland, OR!
Alternatively, I carved the slot in the bottom of my zubat scabbard out a bit so it is wider. More junk fits through, less gets stuck and my saw seats fine.
 

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