Sumac?

Reach

Well-Known Member
I do believe you are looking at Ailanthus, or Tree of Heaven, which is pretty much the opposite of where that tree came from. It’s an invasive from Asia, and the favorite food of the Spotted Lanternfly, a fact everyone in the southeast corner of Pennsylvania has recently become well aware.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
I do believe you are looking at Ailanthus, or Tree of Heaven, which is pretty much the opposite of where that tree came from. It’s an invasive from Asia, and the favorite food of the Spotted Lanternfly, a fact everyone in the southeast corner of Pennsylvania has recently become well aware.
Yeah...it is Ailanthus. Seed pods confirm that. Another name is stinking sumac....but it is not a sumac...but it does stink! Take a whiff - once you know that, it is the easiest way to confirm another if you are ever in doubt.

Ideally, it gets herbicide BEFORE you cut it down to prevent root suckering. If that is not an option, get triclopyr (Garlon) or picloram (Tordon) on the fresh cut stump as soon as you make that last cut. I'll leave the stump a foot or two high until we are done cleaning up, then make a last cut and treat it right away. If you try to treat a stump that was cut more than 20-30 minutes ago, it will be useless.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Yeah...it is Ailanthus. Seed pods confirm that. Another name is stinking sumac....but it is not a sumac...but it does stink! Take a whiff - once you know that, it is the easiest way to confirm another if you are ever in doubt.

Ideally, it gets herbicide BEFORE you cut it down to prevent root suckering. If that is not an option, get triclopyr (Garlon) or picloram (Tordon) on the fresh cut stump as soon as you make that last cut. I'll leave the stump a foot or two high until we are done cleaning up, then make a last cut and treat it right away. If you try to treat a stump that was cut more than 20-30 minutes ago, it will be useless.
Cut stump would need triclopyr 3a (amine formulation), not triclopyr 4 (esther formulation). Consumers at home improvement stores usually get amine formulation at 7%, which is low concentration for cut stump, so you may have to retreat sucker sprouts.
 
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ATH

Well-Known Member
Triclopyr 4 in an oil carrier is very effective cut stump treatment - especially if you get some around the sides to go through the bark.

That is what I have seen the most recommended for pre-cutting treatment.

Mix a little imazapyr in there if you really want to punch it...but that stuff can move in the soil.
 

Ryan Keats

Active Member
I had no idea it suckered that badly from the stump. I don't know much about tree of heaven.. were they planted for a time before they were considered invasives?
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
They were not widely planted...but yes people planted them on purpose.

The problem isn't coming off of the stump (coppice sprouting), but rather the root suckering. If you cut down the main tree, the roots will send up suckers all over the place throughout your yard and all of the neighbors' yards as well.
 

Amber Jones

New Member
Yeah...it is Ailanthus. Seed pods confirm that. Another name is stinking sumac....but it is not a sumac...but it does stink! Take a whiff - once you know that, it is the easiest way to confirm another if you are ever in doubt.

Ideally, it gets herbicide BEFORE you cut it down to prevent root suckering. If that is not an option, get triclopyr (Garlon) or picloram (Tordon) on the fresh cut stump as soon as you make that last cut. I'll leave the stump a foot or two high until we are done cleaning up, then make a last cut and treat it right away. If you try to treat a stump that was cut more than 20-30 minutes ago, it will be useless.
I believe the staghorn sumac looks like Aailanthus they may be in the same family but they definitely don't smell the same
 
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