Stihl MS193T, help needed!

Birdyman88

Branched out member
Location
Arlington
Hey guys hold up!
Remember when you're looking at the flywheel while it is sitting on crankshaft that the key can be ABOVE the crank or BELOW the crank. Let's say the key is directly ABOVE the crank, then you want to file the LEFT side to allow for a CCW advance. If the key is say directly BELOW the crank, then you will file the RIGHT side to allow for CCW advance. It will be the same side of key regardless, it's just how you reference it. Thus what I meant about looking at that baby for a while before you go to filing.
 

Birdyman88

Branched out member
Location
Arlington
Those little needle file sets they have at Walmart work good. They have like 6 files of various shape that cut just fine. I suggest filing from the back side, the way swingdude has his flywheel oriented. There is a slight taper on crankshaft hole that is hard to see from the front.
 

swingdude

De' Island Buzzer
Location
Barbados
Those little needle file sets they have at Walmart work good. They have like 6 files of various shape that cut just fine. I suggest filing from the back side, the way swingdude has his flywheel oriented. There is a slight taper on crankshaft hole that is hard to see from the front.
I do it either but you are correct.
 
Location
MN
+1 on the 2511T, great saw out of the box

My 193T was way more work though than the idle, low, and high. You could get it idled higher to solve the initial start problem, then if the saw was hot, the saw would race at idle and the chain would be spinning when the brake was released. The timing bump was the only thing that worked. Saw runs flawless now.
Whoa, glad I read this! I just went through that exact cycle. The saw ran fine through the break-in period then just kept getting weirder. Took it to a saw shop, they replaced the carburetor! charged me $125 and it still ran weird. I was able to tune it so that it idled nicely on startup, but it would race after a few cuts. I could not get it to idle while hot.
 

Birdyman88

Branched out member
Location
Arlington
Whoa, glad I read this! I just went through that exact cycle. The saw ran fine through the break-in period then just kept getting weirder. Took it to a saw shop, they replaced the carburetor! charged me $125 and it still ran weird. I was able to tune it so that it idled nicely on startup, but it would race after a few cuts. I could not get it to idle while hot.
I would do the timing advance and muffler that was talked about in this thread. I don't think anyone who has done it ever regretted it, as long as you don't overdo the cutting out of the key hole.

Let me make another suggestion before you open the saw up that may only cost you about $5 and 5minutes. I HAVE NOT TRIED THIS, so it is only a suggestion, but I have thought about this for a while. Pull the stock NGK CMR 6H plug out and replace it with a CMR 7H. Here is my thought as to why:

My best guess as to why the 193T runs so differently from cold to hot is that the temp differential of the saw from cold to hot is greater than for the 192T saw. If you notice that the 192T owners never complain too much about their saws, but the 193T owners do. The 193T supposedly has 65% fewer emissions than the 192T. The reason is likely due to the muffler being more restricted and generating more backpressure and heat, as well as a new spark plug that runs hotter than what the 192T used. So, with a saw that runs much hotter, it is POSSIBLE that Stihl retarded the timing a bit on the 193T to compensate for premature ignition due to the higher running temps. So you can see why muffler modding and advancing the timing might be in order. HOWEVER, the 193T also has the NGK CMR 6H, which runs hotter than than the BPMR 7A called out on the 192T. Is it possible that the extra heat from the CMR 6H is part of the problem? You already have a system that is designed to run hotter and increasing the chances of earlier ignition, now you put a hotter running plug in on top of that?! Doesn't make sense to me, unless you're trying to achieve some emissions goal. Maybe you could try just changing the plug for the sake of science. ;)
 
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