Spiking leaners, any advice?

Stumpsprouts

Branched out member
Location
Asheville
Stubs for the win... i watch vids of guys cutting off the stubs and struggling to go up. A few stubs to grab and put feet on makes it so much easier. I agree on the pain in the butt to get on top from the bottom. Sux
But stubs can also be the worst part of your day. I would emphasize this only seems useful on something leaning where your rigs will not get hung up with stubs below. I will ‘polish the nubs’ of stubs on a straight spar removal, I’ve had even a branch collar add a lot of frustration to a lower.
 

rico

Been here a while
Location
redwoods
Stubs for the win... i watch vids of guys cutting off the stubs and struggling to go up. A few stubs to grab and put feet on makes it so much easier. I agree on the pain in the butt to get on top from the bottom. Sux
A dangerous practice that less experienced/competent climbers will use to create a false sense of security..
 

Brocky

Been here a while
Location
Michigan
That would be my only piece of advice. When you approach from below it’s quite a PITA to get topside. I would simply spike from bottom up.

This can also be a good time to use strategic stub placement. On a heavy leaner, if you are rigging, those stubs aren’t going to foul up your pieces.
I’ve called them strategically spaced stubs for alliterative purposes, but like your phrase better, maybe call them strategically placed stubs-SPSs.
 

Stumpsprouts

Branched out member
Location
Asheville
Broken ribs from a slam into a stub might create a punctured lung.

Solid technique, for the win.



No stubs.
dangerous practice that less experienced/competent climbers will use to create a false sense of security..
Never say never! This is something I realistically would break out once a year, but knowing the right time and place for it, it’s a no brainer.
 

rico

Been here a while
Location
redwoods
We are talking about spur climbing here, so I’m curious as to what you guys think is being gained by leaving stubs..
 

rico

Been here a while
Location
redwoods
Agreed. Taking a wrap is a quick and effective way to create some stability when a climber feels the need.. Doesnt explain the need for stubs when spur climbing though.
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Administrator
I've been climbing for a few years and I know leaning leads just suck but I'm wondering if there's any advice or tricks I'm missing when spiking leaning trees when you've no other TIP. Thanks in advance!
Definitely stay on the high side. Spikes can't come out with that angle, even better than vertical. Under and you're done.

I'd also consider a choker line as I go. If it's very spindly I'd close the gap on the lanyard with a prusik and carabiner.
 

rico

Been here a while
Location
redwoods
Definitely stay on the high side. Spikes can't come out with that angle, even better than vertical. Under and you're done.

I'd also consider a choker line as I go. If it's very spindly I'd close the gap on the lanyard with a prusik and carabiner.
Mark just brought up something that has not yet been mentioned during this discussion. When spuuing up leaners you are actually less likely to gaff out (if you stay on the up side).
 

Brocky

Been here a while
Location
Michigan
If one is habitually slamming into the tree, or unable to remember or adapt their climbing and rigging to stub placement then they probably shouldn’t use them.
But if one is able to remember and adapt then they will have obtained what the book calls stub consciousness.
 

rico

Been here a while
Location
redwoods
I am still waiting for someone to explain the benefits of leaving stubs when spur climbing.

And no, this isn’t a conversation about rigging.
 
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Stumpsprouts

Branched out member
Location
Asheville
I am still waiting for someone to explain the benefits of leaving stubs when spur climbing.

And no, this isn’t a conversation about rigging.
The tree has a heavy lean, there’s a branch on the downhill side of the trunk, I cut it and leave a foothold, I use the foothold to make a notch and a back cut from the side of the spar rather than the top of the spar. Look how happy I am! (Tried to upload a sketch but it didn’t work. Rest assured my cartoon self is very happy.)

This is the only time I would leave stubs and it doesn’t happen much at all. Folks on other threads are talking about using them as rigging points, that sounds insane to me but there’s lots of methods I hear about I will never use.

As for lung puncturing, it’s like Brocky says, stub consciousness. Be conscious of where you are, where all hazards are, and account for that in your movement. A fat stub 90 degrees from my chest at my foot level does not concern me.
 

owScott

Branched out member
Location
Lafayette
Ok I am a bit late to this thread and scimmed over it so i hope i am not repeating. On a leaner using spurs with no overhead I spike one leg a bit high and put my knee against the spar and adjust my flip line so my knee locks against the tree. I use the other leg spiked in to help stability basically to stop from falling one side to the next. It takes practice. Add in some small diameter no bark dead elm and negative rigging and you got youreself some real deal skill.
 

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