Speared white pine top removal

moss

Well-Known Member
I do trail clearance work for a couple local land conservation trusts in my area. I work from a spreadsheet that has a date, description, location, map link, sometimes a photo etc. This particular job had no description beyond "two trail obstructions", the general location and no map or photo. I need to have a description to know what saws to bring and whether it's a climb or not, most are not climbs. I figured out where it was and rolled my cart a little over a mile with a minimal gear set, Stihl 261, 25' of 1/2" rigging line, saw tools, light axe, wedges and fuel/bar oil. I got to he first blockage quickly, typical tree across trail. I got to the second one, broken white pine top speared into the middle of the trail and its double top leaning on a second good-sized white pine. Not a candidate to take down from the ground, the way it was hung, one of the tops would come back at me cutting on the ground.

Since I walked all the way to it I wanted to get something done so I cut all the side limbs I could reach from the ground. I left foot long stubs figuring I could ladder climb it then tie in as high as I could reach on the white pine trunk when I came back the next day with climbing gear. Then I decided, well I can probably ladder climb this now and work on it some more with the 261. I tied one end of the rigging rope to the saw and the other around my waist and climbed up. I had excellent footing on the side limbs then tied myself in with one end of the rigging rope in a fixed circle around the hung top and my waist. Leaned back on it and it was pretty comfortable and gave me good hands free positioning. I pulled the saw up and cleaned a bunch more of the higher limbs out. That was enough, needed to be tied into the standing white pine trunk with rope and harness to release the entire piece to the ground.

Came back the next day with this gear set, ladder climbed the hung piece alt lanyard with the end of my main rope and my short lanyard then anchored on the white pine trunk. The rest was pretty straightforward, yet another interesting bit of "small scale" tree work tied in to broken tree parts.







Cleared two tops then released the main piece to the ground



The rest is clear the brush into the woods and cut up and move the heavier stuff off the trail.
-AJ
 
Last edited:

Winchman

Well-Known Member
I don't understand how you have the rope arranged in the shackle for a remote release to work.
2020-12-07 release.jpg
Is everything shown in the pic one continuous rope or two separate ropes?
 

Njdelaney

Well-Known Member
Location
Detroit
It's one rope with two eye pockets sewn in the end. The shackle is for the rope cinch and the carabiner allows him to clip the tail of his climbing rope to the cinch point so he can pull the shackle down to him as he descends and release the cinch. I believe he alternates up and down the tree with two long lanyards. Here's a link to the evolution of his system:
 

moss

Well-Known Member
It's one rope with two eye pockets sewn in the end. The shackle is for the rope cinch and the carabiner allows him to clip the tail of his climbing rope to the cinch point so he can pull the shackle down to him as he descends and release the cinch. I believe he alternates up and down the tree with two long lanyards. Here's a link to the evolution of his system:

Pretty much it, thx! I use a 15' lanyard and the 85' line above for most of my climbing now. It's basically the same as a Running Bowline anchor, the slic pin shackle is the "bowline", using the othe end of my line as the pull down.

Detail of the double-eye end, either the shackle or the carabiner can be implemented at any time in multiple possible configurations:



-AJ
 

New threads New posts

Kask Stihl NORTHEASTERN Arborists Wesspur TreeStuff.com Kask Teufelberger Westminster X-Rigging Teufelberger Tracked Lifts Climbing Innovations
Top Bottom