Sad Holly

Should I try to save the tree

  • Yes- and prune new growth

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • yes- but keep new growth

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • no- its already gone, cut it above new growth

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0

Sam H

New Member
Hello Tree Experts!

I am looking for advice on how to proceed- first time tree owner and woefully naive. I recently had someone out to give quote for removing on dead tree and to give a general survey the trees on my property.

I am conflicted about this Holly tree that the professional said is likely dying due to drought from the past several years (see attached pictures). I want to save the tree if possible (watering, fertilizing, possibly pruning off the new growth on the trunk)- and the professional didn't discourage that effort but said that the tree is likely already lost given the looks of it. He suggested cutting down and allowing just above the new growth and allowing that to take over.

Thoughts? Reading online (which clearly does not make me an expert) makes me think that the new growth is draining resources-- but cutting off could stress the tree too.

I'm sad. I love trees. They are part of why I bought the house/property in the first place!

I would really appreciate your expertise!

Sam
 

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JD3000

Most well-known member
I dont deal with too many hollies save for some shrubs as they dont thrive well in my region. However, I believe that the genus generally requires excellent drainage and can be quite prone to root and crown maladies. Has the drainage pattern changed? Construction in the root zone, has excess soil or mulch been put down?

Hard to say anything about the professional you spoke with but I recommend finding a registered consulting arborist or board certified master arborist in your area. Someone whos primary line of work is consultation and assessment rather than tree removal would be a good choice. Said person can help you investigate the questions I posed to you as well as more.
Good luck
 

evo

Well-Known Member
I'm in the PNW, and I just changed my policy on working on holly's. I won't unless the goal is to kill them. They are very invasive where I live, and you can find them in the last of our old growth forests.
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Most hollies are like rhodies here...root rot, botry canker, chlorotic, and dead.
Some do fine in specific areas but the vast majority are difficult to grow.
 

Sam H

New Member
I'm in the PNW, and I just changed my policy on working on holly's. I won't unless the goal is to kill them. They are very invasive where I live, and you can find them in the last of our old growth forests.
Interesting! I never knew this!! What would you recommend replacing it with (if it comes to that).
 

Sam H

New Member
I dont deal with too many hollies save for some shrubs as they dont thrive well in my region. However, I believe that the genus generally requires excellent drainage and can be quite prone to root and crown maladies. Has the drainage pattern changed? Construction in the root zone, has excess soil or mulch been put down?

Hard to say anything about the professional you spoke with but I recommend finding a registered consulting arborist or board certified master arborist in your area. Someone whos primary line of work is consultation and assessment rather than tree removal would be a good choice. Said person can help you investigate the questions I posed to you as well as more.
Good luck
Thank you for your feedback!

It is possible the drainage pattern has changed and maybe construction in the root zone. Its hard to believe that I didn't think about it being a contributing factor!! We had to have septic work completed prior to the sale of the house. They dug up a large part of the yard-- not sure if it was in the root zone, but it is a reasonable possibility. If anything I would think the amount of moisture has decreased, the drainage field they constructed goes in the opposite direction. Sounds like we have confounding variables and may never know what happened.
 

Sam H

New Member
I'm in the PNW, and I just changed my policy on working on holly's. I won't unless the goal is to kill them. They are very invasive where I live, and you can find them in the last of our old growth forests.
I forgot to mention that I am in the PNW as well. Your comment totally changed my perspective. I thought it was really sad that an old tree was dying- it's much nicer to think that an invasive species is being terminated.
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
Sapsuckers! Look at those rows of little holes. Block the birds' access to the trunk and it may gradually come back in all its former glory. Or, cut it back to the new growth and enjoy a bush.

Ilex aquifolium may be considered a weed, but not classified as Invasive in WA.
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
Does the OP report a lot of seedlings about?

If not, how can it be invasive, if it is not invading the landscape?
 

evo

Well-Known Member
Next time you come to Washington I will take you for a walk in the forest, you will see... It's a specie of concern, just fully so and its just slightly less invasive than scotch broom..
http://www.oregonlive.com/hg/index.ssf/2014/11/invasive_english_holly.html

http://www.kingcounty.gov/~/media/e...ts/noxious_weeds/imagesH/holly_map.ashx?la=en

"In the Seattle Urban Nature Project’s (now EarthCorps) plant inventory of Seattle’s public forests, English holly was frequently found in the understory. In fact, English holly was the fourth most abundant non-native species found, outnumbered only by Himalayan blackberry, Scotch broom and English ivy. English holly, along with English laurel, was more common in the understory than native conifers. Given their findings, it is likely that English holly, along with other invasive non-natives, will be in a much better position to replace Seattle’s aging deciduous trees than our native evergreen trees. Seattle Urban Nature ecologist Ella Elman predicts that, if nothing is done, 30 or 40 years from now Seattle’s forests will look dramatically different than they do today." http://www.kingcounty.gov/environme...-weeds/weed-identification/english-holly.aspx
 
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