Rig Lines melt

trees4life

New Member
My rig line melted. I guess common sense should have told me it would, but feeling spunky we decided to push the variables on a removal we did the other day and utilize only natural unions in the tree to run the line. You know, old school. No Port a wrap, no Good, couple wraps around the trunk-you know what I mean. I was once told by an arborist that sometimes knowing and utilizing these techniqes can be very versitile and usefull in our trade, if in the unlikelyhood it is used. Little did I know my 16 strand now became one strand...one glazed, crispy mess. Learning is fun.
 

pctree

Well-Known Member
dont pitch the rope, it is only the outer layer that is melted. the core is still good and strong. we used to keep using ropes like that for years
 

Norm_Hall

Well-Known Member
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dont pitch the rope, it is only the outer layer that is melted. the core is still good and strong. we used to keep using ropes like that for years

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What?
Any rope manufacturer would say to discard the rope.
If a rope is crispy, what about cycles to failure, let alone compromised rope fibers.

If it's a 16 strand, more than likely it's a climbing line, and there is NO core, it's filler strands. There are very few 16 strand DB's.

Regardless of the rope construction, discard it.
 

Jman

Well-Known Member
If anything keep it around for a tow rope or a rope to pull logs out of the woods. We keep burnt ropes for stuff we know we would never want to use them again. Once retired its gets the truck or it gets the log again.
 

Jsin

New Member
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A good "burn" rope is handy to have. I carry one or two.

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I due the same thing but I cut the rope up into 40ft pieces and hand them out to my friends that ride snowmobiles and quads or my friends that get rowdy and go 4 wheelin.But before I hand it over, I usually give a little insight to the abuse the rope has taken and tell them it isn't to be used in any tree applications!!!!!
 

trees4life

New Member
Its an old retired 16 strand climb line. I would think that in the brain log of cycles to failure, in the event that such might occur, I would prefere my rig line to be the first to go, and with that in mind, why not keep putting it to use? Any manufacture would tell you buy a new line....they need $$$. Sure the strenght is compromised, but the question is...how much? 50%? 90%? maybe 10? How long will it continue to take this abuse? And in the event of an ANTICIPATED failure will the line snap? Shred? Or just continue till its so crispy its hard to flake...
 

Gord

Active Member
One of the key strength features of rope is it's ability to flex and bend around things and maintain it's strength. Being 'crispy' obviously reduces that flexibility and therefore strength even if it hasn't been overloaded too greatly.

I demote ropes like this to things like tying a ladder on the truck or whatever.
 

petes

Member
You shouldn't prefer any line to fail. A rigging line snapping can easily mangle someone working the ground. Risk versus reward - worst case scenario your line snaps over someone's head or over a house, pool, patio, deck... and what is your reward for taking this risk - saving $150 bucks... Seems like a no brainer.
 

Jamin_Mayer

Well-Known Member
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Its an old retired 16 strand climb line. I would think that in the brain log of cycles to failure, in the event that such might occur, I would prefere my rig line to be the first to go, and with that in mind, why not keep putting it to use? Any manufacture would tell you buy a new line....they need $$$. Sure the strenght is compromised, but the question is...how much? 50%? 90%? maybe 10? How long will it continue to take this abuse? And in the event of an ANTICIPATED failure will the line snap? Shred? Or just continue till its so crispy its hard to flake...

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Tom. Good thoughts and questions. I think a rope technician, from a major rope company would be able the narrow down the variables and give a more accurate answer. I know there is a lot of experience and knowledge here, but I think it would be pure speculation.

But, I would simply agree with many others here. Never use it again for rigging. Use it for none life threatening purposes.


And if you don't want it, I'll take it.
 

trees4life

New Member
No I totally agree with all of you, but in light of this experiment-its got me thinking that even if were using a well rated rig line, multiple blocks, and staying with in the limits of all such equipment, am I as a consciencious arborist still anticipating a failure with potential struck by's? With a line thats teetering on the brink or failure your anticipation would be that much more in tune rather than on second burner, as dumb as it would be. Ill keep it for pulling over trees and such. But I think you guys are right. NO LONGER IN USE. Poor guy. It was a good tool.
 

Gerald_Beranek

Active Member
Burning, melting, fusing a rope isn't exclusive to using only natural crotches. I've seen ropes burn and melt on port-a-wraps and capstan winches too.
 

fhfr436

Member
In every industry, you want a warning before failure. "Brittle" failures are the most dangerous kind because they give no warning. The rope's given you the warning. If you don't heed it, you're asking for trouble. Retire the rope.
 

chris_girard

Well-Known Member
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Burning, melting, fusing a rope isn't exclusive to using only natural crotches. I've seen ropes burn and melt on port-a-wraps and capstan winches too.

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Yup, you're right Jerry. This happened on a job we were doing last year lowering with a 5/8" double braid.

Glazed it pretty good on the port-a-wrap and ended up having to cut out a few pieces from the lowering line, Didn't want to do it, but thought that I should err on the side of caution.

Now that we have the GRCS you can fit it with ice packs and reduce the potential glazing, though I haven't had to do that yet.
 

treebing

Well-Known Member
i would say it is sacriledge to ever throw a rope away, as in put in dumpster. That stuff is way too valuable to toss. I cut my ropes where its bad. shorter ropes get used in lesss critical situations usually. Ropes are always useful, just sometimes they have to be demoted.
 

Jamin_Mayer

Well-Known Member
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Now that we have the GRCS you can fit it with ice packs and reduce the potential glazing, though I haven't had to do that yet.

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Or, you could put a frozen burrito in there. By the time lunch rolls up, you're ready to eat a warm burrito.
 

zaphod1798

Member
There are always good uses for old, burnt lines other than landfill. I cut the good ends off and use them to make leadropes and leashes. I use the burnt long sections for scratching posts for cats. I plant a cedar post in the field with my horses, wrap it with an entire old rope, and my horses rub on that instead of fenceposts. Anyone else have any good ideas for old ropes, other than the obvious towlines and such?
 
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