Retrievable non-life support trick

Hey guys, I know this is a little sketchy but think it might be a useful trick using a longer lanyard or rope tail when you don't have enough rope to work with, perhaps coming back from weird limb walk or just for work positioning. It also seems to work in a cinching configuration. You basically just flick the rope with some slack to get the knot to pop through the loop and it comes undone. Disregard the thin rope and sketchy key chain biner lol. Not really my idea, but I've been playing with it low and slow. I know it has obvious limitations but feel free to shame, critique, and tell me I'm going to die lol. Positive feedback also appreciated.
 

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Stumpsprouts

Branched out member
Location
Asheville
Hey guys, I know this is a little sketchy but think it might be a useful trick using a longer lanyard or rope tail when you don't have enough rope to work with, perhaps coming back from weird limb walk or just for work positioning. It also seems to work in a cinching configuration. You basically just flick the rope with some slack to get the knot to pop through the loop and it comes undone. Disregard the thin rope and sketchy key chain biner lol. Not really my idea, but I've been playing with it low and slow. I know it has obvious limitations but feel free to shame, critique, and tell me I'm going to die lol. Positive feedback also appreciated.
Hey, that’s interesting, but I’d suggest something much simpler to do this that does not require any knots and would take less work and achieve the same ‘thing.’ I also don’t like relying on this knot the way you have it. Too much potential for sudden slack. The ‘thing’, as I interpret it, is a way to slow your movement away from a distant place in the tree that you’ve gone out to. And the movement back towards your tree is something you are letting out by hand and is not auto locking.

I never heard anyone name this, please chime in if it has a name. I always think of it as ‘Happy Returns’ after a daylily I once knew.

Take a bight of rope and pass it around the stem in this distant land away from your TIP.

Clip the bight into a biner attached to your bridge.

Hold the tail of your climb line. This is how you will control the speed at which you return.

Detension your lanyard until you are weighted onto this ‘system’. Unclip your lanyard.

Depending on angles and distances, you may feed yourself with the tail of the climb line, or you may have so much friction that you have to pull one strand of the bight towards you to let out tension.

When you have arrived at intended destination, unclip the bight from the biner and pull your tail to you, it will all track itself out of the distant land. (Sometimes it will fight you a little, but it never gets stuck.) EACAD61B-64F2-47AB-A04F-08EF22ADAE93.jpeg
 
Hey, that’s interesting, but I’d suggest something much simpler to do this that does not require any knots and would take less work and achieve the same ‘thing.’ I also don’t like relying on this knot the way you have it. Too much potential for sudden slack. The ‘thing’, as I interpret it, is a way to slow your movement away from a distant place in the tree that you’ve gone out to. And the movement back towards your tree is something you are letting out by hand and is not auto locking.

I never heard anyone name this, please chime in if it has a name. I always think of it as ‘Happy Returns’ after a daylily I once knew.

Take a bight of rope and pass it around the stem in this distant land away from your TIP.

Clip the bight into a biner attached to your bridge.

Hold the tail of your climb line. This is how you will control the speed at which you return.

Detension your lanyard until you are weighted onto this ‘system’. Unclip your lanyard.

Depending on angles and distances, you may feed yourself with the tail of the climb line, or you may have so much friction that you have to pull one strand of the bight towards you to let out tension.

When you have arrived at intended destination, unclip the bight from the biner and pull your tail to you, it will all track itself out of the distant land. (Sometimes it will fight you a little, but it never gets stuck.) View attachment 78184
Cool trick, I've used similar configurations but will occasionally find myself having not brought enough rope.
 
It reminds me of a sheepshank...BTW, has anyone EVER tied one?! even though it seems to be on every list...both loose stability when slackened.
Idk about the sheepshank, this one is inherently somewhat reliant on tension but it seems to be pretty stable, especially with a thicker or more broken in rope.. usually takes a few good whips to get it to pop loose. Definitely wouldn't use for any primary life support situation.
 
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Reach

Been here a while
Location
Atglen, PA
It reminds me of a sheepshank...BTW, has anyone EVER tied one?! even though it seems to be on every list...both loose stability when slackened.
Yes, I can honestly say that I have used a Sheepshank for its intended purpose a couple times in my life. It’s a very limited use knot, but it does work well for what it does.
 

dmonn

Participating member
Location
Mequon
I of course had to google a sheepshank, and loved all the warnings to never, ever use this knot. Along the way I found the Bellringer's Knot, which looks like a great knot for it's intended purpose. If you grab it by mistake at the wrong point you could fall over backwards and get your bell rung!
 

Richard Mumford-yoyoman

Been here a while
Location
Atlanta GA
Hey, that’s interesting, but I’d suggest something much simpler to do this that does not require any knots and would take less work and achieve the same ‘thing.’ I also don’t like relying on this knot the way you have it. Too much potential for sudden slack. The ‘thing’, as I interpret it, is a way to slow your movement away from a distant place in the tree that you’ve gone out to. And the movement back towards your tree is something you are letting out by hand and is not auto locking.

I never heard anyone name this, please chime in if it has a name. I always think of it as ‘Happy Returns’ after a daylily I once knew.

Take a bight of rope and pass it around the stem in this distant land away from your TIP.

Clip the bight into a biner attached to your bridge.

Hold the tail of your climb line. This is how you will control the speed at which you return.

Detension your lanyard until you are weighted onto this ‘system’. Unclip your lanyard.

Depending on angles and distances, you may feed yourself with the tail of the climb line, or you may have so much friction that you have to pull one strand of the bight towards you to let out tension.

When you have arrived at intended destination, unclip the bight from the biner and pull your tail to you, it will all track itself out of the distant land. (Sometimes it will fight you a little, but it never gets stuck.) View attachment 78184
Basically as there are variations. As you describe it has been called Dragon tail. If the bight is above the mulitcender it is an On Bight redirect.
 
Basically as there are variations. As you describe it has been called Dragon tail. If the bight is above the mulitcender it is an On Bight redirect.
I've used an on bite redirect or dragon tail variation as you guys mentioned. I think I'm proposing something a bit different for situations where you may not have enough rope to acomodate that type of system. Maybe I'll make a video later.
 
I've used an on bite redirect or dragon tail variation as you guys mentioned. I think I'm proposing something a bit different for situations where you may not have enough rope to acomodate that type of system. Maybe I'll make a video later.
I've used an on bite redirect or dragon tail variation as you guys mentioned. I think I'm proposing something a bit different for situations where you may not have enough rope to acomodate that type of system. Maybe I'll make a video later.
See if this link works, it would be for srs and supplemental to a life support line.

 
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Richard Mumford-yoyoman

Been here a while
Location
Atlanta GA
See if this link works, it would be for srs and supplemental to a life support line.

I understand now, cool idea and I am seeing it used with a lowering line retrieval.
There is also a retrievable redirect that is being used for life support that is basically a short daisy chain that can be pulled from the back side of the redirect. Also a cool idea until something comes down on that back side and releases it while in use.
IMO and this is just how I climb, neither of these ideas take full advantage of a secondary anchor that can be made to be a very reliable life support connection. It is a whole other topic but tree climbing, again just my opinion, is different than industrial work or rock climbing, our anchors are different and such my climbing style is shaped to address that. This does not do that for ME.
 
I understand now, cool idea and I am seeing it used with a lowering line retrieval.
There is also a retrievable redirect that is being used for life support that is basically a short daisy chain that can be pulled from the back side of the redirect. Also a cool idea until something comes down on that back side and releases it while in use.
IMO and this is just how I climb, neither of these ideas take full advantage of a secondary anchor that can be made to be a very reliable life support connection. It is a whole other topic but tree climbing, again just my opinion, is different than industrial work or rock climbing, our anchors are different and such my climbing style is shaped to address that. This does not do that for ME.
Yeah I totally get if it's not your style, not really mine either. I don't see it being a go to method when a secondary anchor can be easily made as life support. Just a cool little trick for random situations where you didn't bring enough rope (perhaps using lanyard) and wanted some help for work positioning or a limb walk. Maybe I'll mess around without more, it would be interesting to see how many kn before the knot pops through though. Seems to hold well but on. Small diameter or slick ropes it surely wouldn't take much.
 
It reminds me of a sheepshank...BTW, has anyone EVER tied one?! even though it seems to be on every list...both loose stability when slackened.
That’s no sheep shank. I was taught it early on by an old timer. I’ve always used Sheep Shank for a bomber midline knot that always easily unties after extreme loading.
 

Tuebor

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
Here
That’s no sheep shank. I was taught it early on by an old timer. I’ve always used Sheep Shank for a bomber midline knot that always easily unties after extreme loading.
What are you doing with a sheepshank?
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
That’s no sheep shank. I was taught it early on by an old timer. I’ve always used Sheep Shank for a bomber midline knot that always easily unties after extreme loading.


Please share a pic of the knot you're talking about.

This is what I'm talking about.

1200px-Sheepshank_knot.jpg
 

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