( raw unedited crane footage) Here is part #1 of a 5 part crane removal series.

Travor

Active Member
Location
Clearwater
This is my technique, my style, my way. Not necessarily the right way but the way I am comfortable with. These videos show every aspect of a crane assisted tree removal from a climber's point of view. Rigging cutting and communication between the crane operator and climber. I am a contract climber. I have like a thousand hours of footage like this on YouTube if you like this content subscribe.

 
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Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Administrator
This is my technique, my style, my way. Not necessarily the right way but the way I am comfortable with. These videos show every aspect of a crane assisted tree removal from a climber's point of view. Rigging cutting and communication between the crane operator and climber. I am a contract climber. I have like a thousand hours of footage like this on YouTube if you like this content subscribe.

Can't argue that you are open to be criticized since you don't even edit. I like that for sure. When I started doing live demos of removals there wasn't anyone out there doing them. We are all human and will make mistakes or do something in a way that someone can do better. I wish more people would let go of the need to hide faults and worry about comments or likes or criticism.
 

owScott

Well-Known Member
Location
Lafayette
This is not a critic but rather an opinion. I am not a fan of balancing horizontal pieces, if the ball isnt in the exact right spot the butt can come at you as in the video, too much guess work. I prefer standing the piece up with a notch and a shelf to keep the butt on the tree until the pick is vertical. Of course this requires a crane op with skill and experience. Also the the climber must know when to cut, slow the cut and stop. I have had success with large horizontal pieces in the 3000lbs range using this technique. I repeat a skilled crane op who I have worked with for years. I rarely fly picks horizontal.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
This is not a critic but rather an opinion. I am not a fan of balancing horizontal pieces, if the ball isnt in the exact right spot the butt can come at you as in the video, too much guess work. I prefer standing the piece up with a notch and a shelf to keep the butt on the tree until the pick is vertical. Of course this requires a crane op with skill and experience. Also the the climber must know when to cut, slow the cut and stop. I have had success with large horizontal pieces in the 3000lbs range using this technique. I repeat a skilled crane op who I have worked with for years. I rarely fly picks horizontal.
We do the same as you, we rarely balance something unless it’s necessary. We work with the same crane operator almost exclusively too, and he is one of the best tree operators in the area.
 

Bob Bob

Well-Known Member
Location
somewhere
Reviewing your own raw footage can be an excellent training tool. I'm surprised more training programs don't incorporate this in our digital age. When reviewing my videos I'll often catch mistakes or flaws that I was blind to in the moment.
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Administrator
This is not a critic but rather an opinion. I am not a fan of balancing horizontal pieces, if the ball isnt in the exact right spot the butt can come at you as in the video, too much guess work. I prefer standing the piece up with a notch and a shelf to keep the butt on the tree until the pick is vertical. Of course this requires a crane op with skill and experience. Also the the climber must know when to cut, slow the cut and stop. I have had success with large horizontal pieces in the 3000lbs range using this technique. I repeat a skilled crane op who I have worked with for years. I rarely fly picks horizontal.
Nothing wrong with either choice if you're right. Only problem I see is what if you're wrong? And if you are walking the calcity line and the butt drops, well then the operator isn't too excited.
 

owScott

Well-Known Member
Location
Lafayette
Nothing wrong with either choice if you're right. Only problem I see is what if you're wrong? And if you are walking the calcity line and the butt drops, well then the operator isn't too excited.
The butt dropping sucks and can do damage for sure. The butt coming at the climber when the balance is wrong also sucks. Do you have a preferance on techniques?
 
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Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Administrator
The butt dropping sucks and can do damage for sure. The butt coming at the climber when the balance is wrong also sucks. Do you have a preferance on techniques?
Good question. For me I try to get the top to pull slightly quicker than the butt. This gets the butt moving slower and away from me without having to move the crane off center to try to do the same. We all make mistakes though so I'm always looking for my next one!
 

Travor

Active Member
Location
Clearwater
Good question. For me I try to get the top to pull slightly quicker than the butt. This gets the butt moving slower and away from me without having to move the crane off center to try to do the same. We all make mistakes though so I'm always looking for my next one!
Yeah I try to do the same thing. But like you said about the mistakes...
 

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