Q's on rope & hardware choices for a controlled-zipline setup(s) (already have the hardware just uncertain what to use, where..)

eyehearttrees

Active Member
Location
Tampa-Area
I imagine it's subjective to a degree but was hoping for opinions so I can make better use of my gear, goal is controlled slidelining (also, for a similar tree at a different site, controlled-vertical-sliding), done solo*, I'll be taking small pieces but in thinking-through how this'll play out I've hit a couple things I'm uncertain on:

- I'm using 1/2 and 5/8 polydyne lines, both spliced/knotless setups (on one end, other end allows regular use), if there's no clear reason to use the stronger rope in one spot or the other (ie the slideline, or the control-line) then which way would you 'default'? My initial presumption was "The larger 5/8 would make sense as the driftline" but then I began to think that, with its higher strength, our best-effort tensioning of the line will yield a sloppier line (I think...I know I can't stretch the stronger 5/8 as much as I could the 1/2, when setting it...but at the same time, a piece of wood put-into that line would be a lower%ABS load relative to the line, so am unsure)

- I'm seeing no reasons not to 'double whip' the pieces, simply to lessen the forces involved on the stem/trunking I'm rigging from, but can't say I've seen much in the way of people having a 2:1 or double-whip configuration when using controlled-slidelines (I see double whipping as such an "obvious move" in any case where lacing the rings on the log you're cutting isn't a PITA..)

- If I'm planning to have the slideline "run up the tree" (to help stabilize the tree, instead of just anchoring it from the top of the stem), instead of setting anchors and 'fishpoling' it, wouldn't I get better bite by having the rope run around the tree, like 2 or 3 turns around the trunk on its way up, some natural friction and a good, solid 'bracing' of the line to the tree? Or could this make the tensioning of said line become impossible to do w/o mechanical help? (Lines are tensioned w/ simple 3:1 setup, like literally just 4" pulley at the base, run the rope through it and then through another pulley I've friction-hitched to the standing-leg of the rope, easy 3:1 that's always worked for me can post pic if that wasn't clear :p )

Thanks a ton for any advice on this one or "these" ones, one's vertical the other is quite horizontal so two extremes really, will be using the Safebloc & taking small pieces (at least til I get a good feel for the trunk, there's been prior damage so not sure yet just what it can take and obviously not gonna go pushing the bounds on that lol)
 

eyehearttrees

Active Member
Location
Tampa-Area
[think I may've been unclear Re the tensioning of slidelines/ziplines.....if/when solo I obviously cannot tension much, nor can I do the 'snub it, then raise the slideline by tension, so smaller pieces on a much slacker line when done solo and, of course, snubbing them before sliding is another thing that's only when solo...figured to mention this because it turns out that for the slideline (not vertical-slideline) tree that there'll be a groundie there to run ropes so will be nicer as I'd really have preferred someone to actively tension the slideline while I'm aloft, had been thinking of whether I could tension a canopy-anchored slideline myself from in-canopy, using some mech.advantage setup....still thinking as much, just for the knowledge, would LOVE to hear from anyone who's tightened from in-canopy unconventionally (for instance what you do / what you use etc, I've got a pair of 'pulling slings' with pulleys one's a 1.5" and one's a big 4", I use the two of them on lines to make a 3:1 by using a friction-hitch to connect & capture progress, have wondered just how tight I could get a line by myself while aloft!]
 

Mowerr

Well-Known Member
Location
Ny
Holy chit man ....words words words.
We r begging u to just shorten up the words and get to your points and you will have so much more help.....
More words is definitely not better.
Just get your point out there...THEN elaborate when people respond.
This isn't a math test where u gotta show us how you've comes to your conclusions.
 

KevinS

Well-Known Member
Location
ontario
[think I may've been unclear Re the tensioning of slidelines/ziplines.....if/when solo I obviously cannot tension much, nor can I do the 'snub it, then raise the slideline by tension, so smaller pieces on a much slacker line when done solo and, of course, snubbing them before sliding is another thing that's only when solo...figured to mention this because it turns out that for the slideline (not vertical-slideline) tree that there'll be a groundie there to run ropes so will be nicer as I'd really have preferred someone to actively tension the slideline while I'm aloft, had been thinking of whether I could tension a canopy-anchored slideline myself from in-canopy, using some mech.advantage setup....still thinking as much, just for the knowledge, would LOVE to hear from anyone who's tightened from in-canopy unconventionally (for instance what you do / what you use etc, I've got a pair of 'pulling slings' with pulleys one's a 1.5" and one's a big 4", I use the two of them on lines to make a 3:1 by using a friction-hitch to connect & capture progress, have wondered just how tight I could get a line by myself while aloft!]
Can’t is a strong position. To snug up a vertical zip line it may be a pain but a top anchor knot down through a basal block back up to a porti or friction hitch. Basically a top adjusting 2:1 tensioner on a vert zip. But that will get annoying quick. A grounder is the simplest solution
 

eyehearttrees

Active Member
Location
Tampa-Area
Holy chit man ....words words words.
We r begging u to just shorten up the words and get to your points and you will have so much more help.....
More words is definitely not better.
Just get your point out there...THEN elaborate when people respond.
This isn't a math test where u gotta show us how you've comes to your conclusions.
Apologies, just made a new thread & think it will pass in this regard! Will begin doing edits for my posts here because I know this has been a problem, thanks for not being rude about it I appreciate that & will be/am getting better :)
Can’t is a strong position. To snug up a vertical zip line it may be a pain but a top anchor knot down through a basal block back up to a porti or friction hitch. Basically a top adjusting 2:1 tensioner on a vert zip. But that will get annoying quick. A grounder is the simplest solution
This...this is so frickin'-obvious that I feel foolish not seeing it myself, was kinda stressing over a job (was a pretty mean leaner but it was at a new client's and I realllly wanted to land him as client!!) Groundies are great but cannot afford their workers'-comp (and typically like being solo anyway, though I realize I probably won't be able to get-away with that for that much longer :p )
 

eyehearttrees

Active Member
Location
Tampa-Area
If you can find someone up to the task of groundie you can employ them through a temp agency to be fully covered
But then you get a new guy that may not have the training but if you follow the KISS rule you maybe ok

Thanks a ton I hadn't really thought of it like this, was seeing it black&white, love the idea of a legit, 1-day groundie when needed (had been thinking of it as just "I'll stay solo until I've done well enough I can hire a groundie", like it has to be a full time groundie or nothing at all :p
 

seedy j

New Member
Location
winnipeg
I have been thinking of this lately. Anchor the speedline to the ground. Take the slack up the tree to where you would typically tie it off on the trunk. Put the speedline through a pulley. Wherever you redirect the speedline use a progress capture (I was going to use a prusik cord after a pulley. Prusik on the side between the pulley and the anchor point).
I find this kind of rigging to be exciting for the rhythm between the groundie and climber, but I've also noticed the rhythm to frustrating sometimes.
 

KevinS

Well-Known Member
Location
ontario
I have been thinking of this lately. Anchor the speedline to the ground. Take the slack up the tree to where you would typically tie it off on the trunk. Put the speedline through a pulley. Wherever you redirect the speedline use a progress capture (I was going to use a prusik cord after a pulley. Prusik on the side between the pulley and the anchor point).
I find this kind of rigging to be exciting for the rhythm between the groundie and climber, but I've also noticed the rhythm to frustrating sometimes.
I’ve done this and for light to medium it’s not bad. I usually follow the prussik with a slip knot in the line so it doesn’t creep.
Also be sure that your biner or whatever you are zipping down can’t hit that friction hitch. If it can just redirect then go to a separate location for your tender.
I usually like a 3:1 on my zip lines tension at the bottom which can still easily be caught with a friction hitch.
If it’s just light stuff and isn’t really anything to worry about just imo fyi skip all that and just crank it tight onto a porti. Cinched on a big porti is the same tension (give or take) as through 1 pulley.

In a pinch I’ve used your idea with just one rope. Crown anchor and basal target anchor your other end with a clove hitch and with the tail tie a taught line and pull tight use the sock and chase it with a slip knot. It’ll hold.

But my ideal zip line is crown anchor and that line runs down through 2 pulleys for a 3:1 anchored to a porti. That setup will go all day every day.
 

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