Polypore mushroom and butt rot

Jzack605

Active Member
Location
Long island
I found this Polypore on a big black walnut today. It was ID’d as being Bondarzewia berkeleyi on one of the Facebook ID groups. It seems to be indicative of butt rot in hardwoods. Was curious if anyone found there was an indicator as to how severe that it may be; my intuition says it is *probably* fine. The canopy looked good but I know that doesn’t always correlate with what’s happening inside or below the soil line.

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KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Dr. Chris Luley has a nice article on Bondarzewia (aka Berkeley's Polypore) that was published in TCI Magazine and reposted here. I consider the presence of these large fruitbodies as an indicator of advanced decay. Also, I know nothing of the mycological prowess of folks who identify fungi through Facebook, but looks like a good call to me.
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
Location
East US, Earth
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The lower right pic on this slide is a white oak with B.b. Removed a 38# conk in 2006 where there was construction damage circa 1932 (right side of image). Reduced it "9%" in 2008 and 2010. Owner died; new owner rebuffs my entreaties to continue. Tree looks good today. Shingle oak in Cincy; similar story.

All these 4 "high target" trees look (and sound) fine in fact. I reduced them once or twice.
The idea of condemning trees that have living sapwood all around lacks scientific basis and imo boils down to flying blind, or mycophobia, if not fearmongering. All respect to Dr. Luley but he may overstate concerns re B.B., and most of the others.

I am happy to be corrected on this. Been showing these cases for decades now; still waiting for correction.
 

Jzack605

Active Member
Location
Long island
I appreciate the input and resources @guymayor and @KTSmith . Truth be told I lean more toward your thought process @guymayor. I’m never quick to condemn any tree. Looks like we will be seeing what the resistograph turns up.

The unfortunate reality of this property is a lot of their bigger trees had declined significantly, and they were all at one time filled with concrete.

here is one from a removal this winter I was on, taken a week ago on an IPM visit.

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KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Ah, I did not recommend immediate removal in response to confirmed Bondarzewia. I stand by by my recollection that these large fruitbodies are an indicator of advanced decay. But, I was incomplete: the decay never extends far up into the stem. On two removals last year which I kibitzed of large Norway Maple with the disease, there was good remaining sapwood wall thickness at stump height, but very little residual wall thickness of the large-diameter buttress roots. Failure is more a toppling from the base rather than a snapping of the butt log. That last statement is only anecdotal with a sample size of maybe 6. But does speak to the value of knowing who is causing which infection.
 

guymayor

Well-Known Member
Location
East US, Earth
Absolutely! Removal is a common recommendation; not yours! Sorry to be unclear (and rant).
It is a bad actor, and I agree with the toppling at the base scenario. Hence the load reduction prescription, and the need to monitor. That's also why the tomograph was taken at 5 cm from grade.

Vitality is remarkably unaffected, and I'm of the opinion that trees can keep adding sapwood to compensate for the butt rot. Pic taken across a busy 4 lane road in Raleigh NC. Target rich for sure! Sure would like to reduce it some more.
And if I had a tomo rig I'd get another image just out of curiosity.
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Took me a while to dig this out of the path library at NCSU; it's probably on your shelf...
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KTSmith

Well-Known Member
Yes, I have my copy of Overholts (1953) within easy reach. Although the nomenclature needs to be checked with current usage, it's my favorite monograph of the polypores. Not really a field guide, although lots of practical info as with the above.
 
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