Partially failed trees and the added complications

This had been the first decent failed tree we had dealt with in a long while and I forgot had much more complicated it makes things compared to a regular tree removal. There are forces and pressure being added in many places, some of which are hard to predict.
In this video we were faced with a Scots Pine tree with a huge stem that had failed onto an apartment building. The tree was still partially attached at the point of failure and the tip end of the stem was resting on the roof of the building.
Partially failed trees are always tricky as you must never assume you know where pressure is in the stem, and you don’t know how wood will react when you start cutting.
We called upon a lot of our rigging knowledge in an attempt to avoid any unexpected movement, dropping of wood and branches and to keep everyone on site safe.
We used 3 rigging systems, double block rigging methods, 5:1 M/A haul systems, and we explain our plan and process as we go.

What is the trickiest failed tree you guys and girls have had to deal with? What was the situation? What methods did you use?

 

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moss

Been here a while
Looking good! I've done some crazy hung trees as likely many have, especially storm work. It's a beautiful thing when you release a rigged piece and it barely moves.

I'm pretty shy of being at level to or below heavy rigged pieces that I'm working on, your guy had great confidence in the setup.

Great production work on the vid, not easy to put all that together.
-AJ
 

SeanRuel

Branched out member
Location
Portland
The whip tackle/ 2:1 on the failed stem is absolutely awesome to use. Smooths out Movement from using a 4 or 5:1 to lift. Also, more rope In the system means slower, more controlled lifts and lowering.

I tend to set back stays/ Guy lines to support the rigging point if possible. Cheap extra security.

The more separation/ angle you have between rigging points the greater control you can achieve on the failed piece.

I tend to secure the failed butt end to just below the break if possible to prevent any huge swings or drops if it suddenly breaks loose.

Definitely a great feeling to solve these puzzles
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Dan really enjoyed this video.
Addenda: (Wanted to add this but got tossed out on my iPhone)
I was reminded about work some years ago clearing avalanche debris off some ski trails - one huge jumble took the best part of half a day to cut thru and was like a big scary game of pick up sticks. Further up the trail the last job of the day was untangling five about 20' to 28" spruces, on a steep switchback, that had been smashed into a bound up jumble by another slide that spring. With great care we released the binds on all but the last and when it did finally go, the root ball/ soil and rocks at the base of it sprang the remaining ~20 feet of stem back upright just like a trebuchet. It was amazing to watch. And scary. Another thing I remember was seeing one still standing two foot spruce that had the stem of another smaller spruce driven right thru the standing tree. That avi would have been completely unsurvivable with all the swept debris. Reminder of just how insignificant we actually are. Work one has to approach with a lot of respect and maybe what does Buckin' say? "I am not in a hurry and I am at peace . . "? Stay safe out there.
 
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27RMT0N

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
WA
I'm traveling at the moment but I do appreciate your videos Dan, so I'll watch it when I get home.

I just got this texted to me, so its waiting for as soon as I'm back. Pretty big, should be fun.

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Serf Life

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
Maine Island
Add this to the whip tackle examples. This property is on a rock outcropping with no lift or crane access. Three stories and a rooftop deck. Having nice even pull around railings and windows without a grcs made removal as controlled as possible. Tag lines, progress capture, ratchet/chain strapped cracks, triangulated rigging points, back stays etc all setup beforehand with failed trees so there’s no frigging around with throwbags etc after it starts moving. 1C04DCFB-1AB0-4919-91AA-63B39B7EC2DF.jpeg
 

moss

Been here a while
The whip tackle/ 2:1 on the failed stem is absolutely awesome to use. Smooths out Movement from using a 4 or 5:1 to lift. Also, more rope In the system means slower, more controlled lifts and lowering.

I tend to set back stays/ Guy lines to support the rigging point if possible. Cheap extra security.

The more separation/ angle you have between rigging points the greater control you can achieve on the failed piece.

I tend to secure the failed butt end to just below the break if possible to prevent any huge swings or drops if it suddenly breaks loose.

Definitely a great feeling to solve these puzzles
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Great stuff! It has that feel of, "Wait a minute, do we have another line?", "Well, we've got over 600' of rigging line in play at the moment, maybe the homeowner has a Home Depot rope in the garage? I'm kidding, I'm kidding!". As they duck thrown cups of lukewarm coffee.
-AJ
 

owScott

Branched out member
Location
Lafayette
Why not pick it with a crane if you can reach it especially if it sat for 2 weeks? Couple hours of crane time would be cheaper than all the man hours and less risk. Not trying to be critical just asking. I wasn' there so all the variables arent clear.
 

moss

Been here a while
Why not pick it with a crane if you can reach it especially if it sat for 2 weeks? Couple hours of crane time would be cheaper than all the man hours and less risk. Not trying to be critical just asking. I wasn' there so all the variables arent clear.
I'm guessing that access was either not possible and/or practical from a logistics point of view for any of the jobs shown in the thread. Or they would've done it, right?
-AJ
 

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