New Hobbs

jdhoward

Active Member
Location
des Moines
Pulled the trigger on a hobbs h2. Chose it over the grcs because of people saying it’s reliable and lasts forever.
Does anybody have links to videos on how to use it? Any tips and tricks for it would be useful too. Teaching my groundies that have spent their whole careers wrapping trees is going to interesting.
 

chiselbit

Well-Known Member
Here’s a tip: don’t stand in front of the device without the rope going thru the pigtail. Bad things happen. I’d go further and say don’t stand in front of the device period. Stay off to the side so there’s no chance of the rope coming off the bollard.
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
Location
Lancaster, PA
Pulled the trigger on a hobbs h2. Chose it over the grcs because of people saying it’s reliable and lasts forever.
Does anybody have links to videos on how to use it? Any tips and tricks for it would be useful too. Teaching my groundies that have spent their whole careers wrapping trees is going to interesting.
Not trying to bust you down, but if you don't how to use if how do you know you need it?

Tony
 

jdhoward

Active Member
Location
des Moines
We’ve got one, it doesn’t come out a ton, but surely glad we have it when it does.... great for tricky storm damaged stuff.
Right. Ive got a bunch of removals coming up where it would just be easier to pick the branches up then piece them out. Also too close to structures or power lines for a drag line. Too low for zip-line etc.
 

Jonny

Well-Known Member
Location
Buffalo
Rumor has it you can beat the ever living dog fuck out of it and it’ll keep taking whatever you throw at it.

I think Rico has one in service that got runned over with a dozer or something.
 

TreeCo

Well-Known Member
I bought a Hobbs back in 91 directly from Don Blair at some convention.

Bought a GRCS back in 2003 directly from Greg Good..

I loved them both!

Every arborist should have one.
 
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chiselbit

Well-Known Member
View attachment 75075 This is a mod I did several years ago and have a thread about it on TH titled Hobbs Mod. 3/4" socket and some set screw/bolts holding it in place.
I really like that. I was thinking about using a steering wheel somehow, but maybe your socket wrench idea would be better. Certainly get more torque on it. How did you make the center part?
 

flushcut

Well-Known Member
Location
Delavan, WI
I really like that. I was thinking about using a steering wheel somehow, but maybe your socket wrench idea would be better. Certainly get more torque on it. How did you make the center part?
David Driver made this giant wheel calling it the Xwheel for the Hobbs but it is $$$$$$ and bulky.
I wish I were more techie or I would link the thread at TH there are a few other good ideas that came out of that thread.
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
Location
Lancaster, PA
Seen it compared to a grcs. I wanna pick stuff up and it picks stuff up. “Need” meh probably not. Want? Yea for sure.
Fair enough.

Like many here I have worked with both. Both are excellent, tough tools. The asked my opinion I always say if when using the device:

If you negative rig a lot and lift a little, then got Hobbs

If you lift a lot and negative rig a little, then go GRCS

As always never turn down a good deal on either device if you find it!

I think the biggest difference is not in how tough they are, but in the number of people it takes to be efficient with it. The GRCS can be used by a single ground person no problem when lifting. The disadvantage is to go from lift to lower takes more "changeover." The Hobbs really requires two people to lift efficiently, but the lift to lower exchange is faster. Having two people has never been a huge issue for me as if the removal or rig is big enough to warrant either device, then I would have more than one grounds person anyway.

Potato, potato dependent on how you run your show.

Good luck.

Tony
 

rico

Well-Known Member
Location
redwoods
Been running a Hobbs since before the advent of dirt, the light bulb, and the chocolate chip cookie....While other more expensive lowering devices have ended up in the scrap metal pile, the Hobbs has remained...No matter what we have thrown at it, or asked it to do, it has always been up to the task.....

An extremely simple and robust machine...I currently run 2 of the new ones (amazing), and one of the originals, which was in fact run over by a large piece of equipment....

Highly recommended..
 

owScott

Well-Known Member
Location
Lafayette
Here’s a tip: don’t stand in front of the device without the rope going thru the pigtail. Bad things happen. I’d go further and say don’t stand in front of the device period. Stay off to the side so there’s no chance of the rope coming off the bollard.
Good advice, dont stand under the tree near the device while lowering especially negative rigging.
 

TreeCo

Well-Known Member
One thing that I enjoyed with the Hobbs over the Good was that when negative rigging for the short amount of time that the piece is in free fall that a quick pull of the rope can take out some of the slack that develops. The trick of course is that the instant the slack is removed the rope should be allowed to run under friction to reduce shock in the system. The Harken winch on the Good is not ratcheted and does not allow for that little bit of slack to be removed. Overall I'd rate both devices as being equal and any differences in devices being far outweighed by the level of skill of the operator and climber combination.

The GRCS has an improved winching ability, especially if there is only one ground person. Usually when either device is employed there is more than one person and the three ft. bar used with the Hobbs for winching is done by the second ground person. As soon as the winching on the Hobbs is over and the piece starts to go the 'wincher' needs to make a mad dash to get away from the Hobbs as it usually very near to being directly under the load.
 

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