Mini Skids

wyoclimber

Well-Known Member
Location
Cody, WY
I'm looking into Mini Skids. From what I've seen I'm thinking the big Boxer or Vermeer. Anyone have any experience with them? I may end up looking at a Dingo as well, a lot smaller but I might have a line on a well maintained one for a decent price.
 

Mark13y

Active Member
Location
Rock Creek, Ohio
Boxers are sweet, go with the bigger one (540?) and a branch manager and your set. I hate vermeers of any type, heard good things about the dingo but haven't personally ran one.
 

jim454

Well-Known Member
I like the Dingo wheeled mini. I'm on my 3rd one since '98. The controls are a bit awkward but they're still a good little machine. The big selling point for me was the coupler that attaches the pump to the crank. Toro uses a rubber dampener that takes the jarring from the connection. That means you won't have to pull the pump from the motor every 400 or so hours to grease and inspect the coupler ans shaft. That and Toro is a company that's been around for years and stands behind their product. At least that's been my experience.
 
Last edited:

Baja Mike

Active Member
Look at the ditch witch I bought the sk 755 and love it
I am pretty sure it has the highest lift and capacity it is amazing what you can do with that after a few hours on the controls.I have had it for 13 months now and am still amazed at its capabilities.
 
We have the Vermeer s800tx. We love it! its our first/only one so we don't have anything to compare it too but its awesome. The only change we did was we went with a Ryan's Equipment grapple instead of the Vermeer one. (full 360 degrees hydraulic rotation) We have had no problems with it to date, but I should say that I work for a small residential company (5 guys in the field) so its not used everyday. We have had it for 9 months now and just hit 100 hrs. We love it no question. They can make you a cowboy and possibly lazy(personal experience) but either way good luck with your decision and keep us posted on what you go with!
Kieran
 

wyoclimber

Well-Known Member
Location
Cody, WY
Hmm. I think I'm gonna have to figure out a way to test drive a few. Not in a huge hurry anyway, I don't feel like adding a payment right before winter so I don't think it's going to happen before spring. Anyone know of any good equipment dealers in Denver who might let me play around on some?
 

wyoclimber

Well-Known Member
Location
Cody, WY
Not much selection to try out here in rural Wyoming. In fact, I think the Bobcat dealer is the only place I've even seen a mini skid. Not a bad idea though, maybe I can talk the local tractor supply/saw shop into carrying some to rent. They like me there, I've spent $5000 on saws this summer so they'd better.
 

flyingsquirrel25

Well-Known Member
Location
South East, PA
It sounds to me like you are going to want to start with the Bobcat version first (heard good things about the MT55). Otherwise you may be traveling a long way for service if you have a problem. If you do find a place that you can demo them, drive around on different surfaces (pavemnt, grass, gravel ect.) to find out how they handle it and how the surface handles the machine. They sure are nice to have. Good luck
 

Lumberjack

Well-Known Member
One thing to consider is Bobcat uses a different plate than the rest of the minis. It's the same as the Gehl AL140.
 

Mangoes

Well-Known Member
Anyone done a cost-benefit analysis and/or Return on Investment review?

I sold mine after 5 years and gave up on the principle.

ROI was easy to figure out, but cost benefit analysis was more abstract, and didn't prove viability. Quick issues:
- lawn damage
- extra assets required to function the machine: trailer, tow vehicle, peripheral fuel cost
- lawn damage
- lawn damage mitigation costs: plywood/mats
- training and competency obligations (P&P required for each machine or process, for those that care to adhere to regs) and the costs associated with implementing
- lawn damage

I got really bored with being accountable for lawn landscape damages I didn't perform.
 

wyoclimber

Well-Known Member
Location
Cody, WY
In my area firewood is high value. I'd also like to move into minimizing waste by doing reclamation projects with anything I can. Making a big wooden trough sink out of Elm right now and I've done Russian Olive bookcases in the past. Once you get into that, I don't see how I can avoid having a skid and a dump trailer. The mini skid is really a starting point to allow me to move larger pieces of wood easier. Eventually I'll likely move to a full sized skid steer but I figure, one step at a time.
 

flyingsquirrel25

Well-Known Member
Location
South East, PA
Anyone done a cost-benefit analysis and/or Return on Investment review?

I sold mine after 5 years and gave up on the principle.

ROI was easy to figure out, but cost benefit analysis was more abstract, and didn't prove viability. Quick issues:
- lawn damage
- extra assets required to function the machine: trailer, tow vehicle, peripheral fuel cost
- lawn damage
- lawn damage mitigation costs: plywood/mats
- training and competency obligations (P&P required for each machine or process, for those that care to adhere to regs) and the costs associated with implementing
- lawn damage

I got really bored with being accountable for lawn landscape damages I didn't perform.

Lawn damage is a huge concern for me as well. I pride myself and sell my work on the quality of the job and what the property looks like when I am complete. One of my big concerns is leaving ruts on someones lawn with my truck. My mini skid allows me to park my truck on the pavement, haul the brush to the street and feed the chipper off pavement. I will say I just purchased a few mats for those areas where I need to turn on grass.

My return on investment review; I purchased a used unit in my second quarter because of work load and being behind on getting the work done and net income (work was there just couldnt get to it). I just began my fourth quarter and I have already surpassed net income for my entire year last year, and I am only caring a 4 week back log vs. the 8 week I had in May (less people turning away due to the back log as well).
My conclusion... Great purchase, thanks to BrendonV and SuperK.
 
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brendonv

Well-Known Member
Location
CT
Anyone done a cost-benefit analysis and/or Return on Investment review?

I sold mine after 5 years and gave up on the principle.

ROI was easy to figure out, but cost benefit analysis was more abstract, and didn't prove viability. Quick issues:
- lawn damage
- extra assets required to function the machine: trailer, tow vehicle, peripheral fuel cost
- lawn damage
- lawn damage mitigation costs: plywood/mats
- training and competency obligations (P&P required for each machine or process, for those that care to adhere to regs) and the costs associated with implementing
- lawn damage

I got really bored with being accountable for lawn landscape damages I didn't perform.

Maybe get better operators? Ive never had a complaint, or have had to fix lawn damage in seven years operating a mini skid. Trailers are not nessesary, in seven years my two minis have been on a trailer a total of a less than a dozen times. Fuel...diesel burns about $2 an hour at full throttle which is unessesary for tree operations. So fuel costs for the day, because we are not equipment operators, is probably $10. Everyones circumstances are different though. I know i cant, and havent lifted rounds of wood in a long long time. Our logs leave jobsites in nine foot + lengths.
 

Oroboros

Well-Known Member
Location
Hockley
How do you haul your mini Brendon? I saw a pic of yours with it in your chip box. Where does it go if the box is full?
 

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