Magnetic block heaters?

Leafguy

Member
Hey,
Anyone have any experience using magnetic block heaters on the chippers?

I have a diesel chipper with no block heater. Looking for some options to help with starting. I've seen a few options for magnest or silicone pads. Best to put it on the the oil pan or engine. Just wondering if these are a gimmick or worth while. Or any other tips for cold starting chippers. Not interested in using starter fluid.

Thanks
 

GregManning

Super Moderator
Staff member
My diesel tractor did not have a heater when I bought it. However, it did have a "plugged port" to be able to install one; which I did.
Are you sure you engine does not have a port ?
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
‘Best’ is a frost plug heater into the water jacket. Or two

Battery wrap heater

I’ve got a couple magnetic s for specific needs. They’re cheap and easy to indtalll. A couple on ghe oil pan. Things may be different now but I was told that having warmed oil is better than a warm block
 

GregManning

Super Moderator
Staff member
Someone warned me that the plug could be VERY difficult to remove.
So I let my dealer do it. They had a VERY difficult time removing it ! ! !
(I guess Deere didn't want the plug to to leak. ;) )
 

Leafguy

Member
Not sure. It's a cat diesel on a small morbark chipper. I'll look into that.

Was hoping the magnetic option could be a quick option to get by for now.
 

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
Have been told the magnetic ones are better for much small engines (less than 25hp?) and to stick with oil or coolant heaters. Old school way is tarp and lightbulb, redneck way is coals...
 

GregManning

Super Moderator
Staff member
Have been told the magnetic ones are better for much small engines (less than 25hp?) and to stick with oil or coolant heaters. Old school way is tarp and lightbulb, redneck way is coals...
........ coals, or I have seen a kerosene torpedo heat aimed at the engine. ;)
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
If you go to the mfg. website you'll likely find charts with pics showing where the heater goes in. You might get lucky like I did.

Heater solution

@Leafguy

Do a search on the word "heater" and you'll find more discussion.
 

adolan

Member
We have used a 3' chunk of 6" duct pipe with an elbow pointed up at the oil pan and a propane tiger torch. Works well but takes a bit of time to warm up the oil pan but it keeps the flame off of the pan.
Those magnetic heaters are ok but if your dealing with really cold temps they aren't enough (-30c or colder ) we usually end up boosting the chippers and using the tiger torch.

Good luck ! Cold weather can be a challenge lol
 

SomethingWitty

Arkansawyer
We have used a 3' chunk of 6" duct pipe with an elbow pointed up at the oil pan and a propane tiger torch. Works well but takes a bit of time to warm up the oil pan but it keeps the flame off of the pan.
Those magnetic heaters are ok but if your dealing with really cold temps they aren't enough (-30c or colder ) we usually end up boosting the chippers and using the tiger torch.

Good luck ! Cold weather can be a challenge lol
Why the hell are you starting a truck at -30c?

Without my heater plugged in, my 12 valve cummins doesn't really like anything below freezing. I bet it doesn't like it that cold no matter what.
 

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
We have used a 3' chunk of 6" duct pipe with an elbow pointed up at the oil pan and a propane tiger torch. Works well but takes a bit of time to warm up the oil pan but it keeps the flame off of the pan.
Those magnetic heaters are ok but if your dealing with really cold temps they aren't enough (-30c or colder ) we usually end up boosting the chippers and using the tiger torch.

Good luck ! Cold weather can be a challenge lol
Gonna give that a go next time. No power by the chipper and generator died last year. Somedays the deere fires right up, others not so much.
 

Woodwork

Well-Known Member
I use a 200W "Kat's" heater (about $40) on the raw-water-cooled Chevy 350 in my inboard boat. It's magnetic, and I stick it to the bottom of the oil pan. I figure "heat rises" and by heating the oil in the pan, the heat gets distributed throughout the engine fairly well (along with maybe some oil vapor). On a diesel, heating the oil pan should make it easier to turn over in the winter by making the oil less viscous (or is it more viscous? -- I forget). I think they also make 300W and 400W versions of the same heater.

That said, the engine in my boat is down in the bilge and shielded from the wind. Not sure how well the same arrangement would work if the oilpan and heater were exposed to winter gales...
 
Last edited:
Top