Knowing how hard you can safely push your chainsaw?

eyehearttrees

New member
Location
Tampa-Area
Yesterday while removing a pair (well, shared trunk-base!) of Pine-specie trees, each in the 50' range, I got it down to a ~15' "stump" trunk that I was going to fell. I removed my belt & spurs and realized, w/ my 42cc/18" still on the bench at-home, all I had was my 16" echo 355t (36cc)

Did 'beaver cuts' around the base, basically making two huge side face-cuts so I'd have the room to get my saw in to make the actual/true face and back cuts....if I didn't leave that much height on this leaning tree I don't know how I would've gotten it down, thankfully wedges let me basically plunge-cut / bore-cut my way through the center-wood of it!

Problem.....I was SMOKING my 355t doing this :/ I burnt-out a chain I'd put on right before the job (it got too hot and some of the links fused...oiler was working!) so I started letting it 'rest' after ~5min sessions (and would take smaller cuts with the 10"/25cc :p ) During one of these I'd gone to swap chains on the 355t and, inside the clutch-cover, was a gray-ish slurry....hard to think it was a result of anything but metal-shavings/dust :(

How do you know how hard to run your saws? I need to check-back to my "need a good BIG saw" thread & go purchase something new, just uncertain whether it's foolish to go for a ~60cc // 24" class unit, or if it's smarter to bite the bullet & go 75cc+ with 30"+....will need that soon enough anyway so a 60cc "in-between" seems wasteful..

Thanks for thoughts/input on how hard you push your gear, and what you're keeping in-mind & watching for while doing this!

(Context for saws-- I only run no-ethanol fuel with HP Ultra, I have clean air filters, only mods are muff & airflow & carb (and I run them 'normal' not fat or lean), and my "cut style" or approach is basically bury the bar while focusing on chain-speed, not letting it drop too far from 'ideal' IE not forcing my saw but also not "just letting it do its thing" either!)
 

Njdelaney

Branched out member
Location
Detroit
It sounds like you dulled your chain pretty badly, or were possibly cutting metal without knowing it. That would explain the metal shavings/slurry. If you're overworking your saw, the motor will bog down, whereas if you're cutting with a dull chain it will usually rev higher while making less or no progress. Did you experience either of those? Also, buy a 70cc saw and 2 bars for it, a 20" and a 32". Just my .02
 

Crimsonking

Carpal tunnel level member
Definitely show some pics of you have them. I’ve felled 20+” diameter tulips with a 201, shouldn’t be a problem.

As for larger saws- I’ve heard good things about the husq 572, but I’ve experienced the satisfaction of running my 462 for over a year. 25” light bar, and it does sooo well. Today I never used my 200, just kept the 462 on my saddle all day- craning pines and bombing willow oak stems.
 

Reach

Been here a while
Location
Atglen, PA
Definitely show some pics of you have them. I’ve felled 20+” diameter tulips with a 201, shouldn’t be a problem.

As for larger saws- I’ve heard good things about the husq 572, but I’ve experienced the satisfaction of running my 462 for over a year. 25” light bar, and it does sooo well. Today I never used my 200, just kept the 462 on my saddle all day- craning pines and bombing willow oak stems.
Yes, pictures please. I too have done some big cuts with small saws with no ill effect. Cutting dead wood though, especially in the root buttresses, can cook a chain because the oiler often can’t push enough oil to make up for the heat from the wood. That does not explain the clutch though, unless you were overloading the saw and causing the clutch to slip.

The 462 with a 25” lightweight bar is an excellent combination, it is by far my favorite ground saw and I have no problem running it with a crane, although my new favorite crane saw is the new 400 with a 20” lightweight.
 

Crimsonking

Carpal tunnel level member
Yes, pictures please. I too have done some big cuts with small saws with no ill effect. Cutting dead wood though, especially in the root buttresses, can cook a chain because the oiler often can’t push enough oil to make up for the heat from the wood. That does not explain the clutch though, unless you were overloading the saw and causing the clutch to slip.

The 462 with a 25” lightweight bar is an excellent combination, it is by far my favorite ground saw and I have no problem running it with a crane, although my new favorite crane saw is the new 400 with a 20” lightweight.
The 400 has not gotten my attention yet. Any facts that might sway me? I’m curious to try some of the midrange husqs, that brand is growing on me. My 395 has converted me. For now, my 462 does the most cutting of all my saws.
 

Reach

Been here a while
Location
Atglen, PA
The 400 has not gotten my attention yet. Any facts that might sway me? I’m curious to try some of the midrange husqs, that brand is growing on me. My 395 has converted me. For now, my 462 does the most cutting of all my saws.
The biggest thing for me is the acceleration, the throttle response is very nearly instant. It has great power, probably not quite as much as a 462, but I haven’t run it head to head yet to compare.

We bought one to run in the air, primarily to work with the cranes, and it’s been doing very well at that. It’s a little heavier than the 362 (our “small” ground saw, also with a 20” bar) but definitely more powerful.

My thought is that it’s a good saw to consider if you have a purpose for a saw of that size, but it’s not special enough to buy just to have one. The magnesium piston concept being so new also makes me wonder about longevity, but Stihl is usually pretty good about testing their products, they don’t produce many lemons.
 

27RMT0N

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
WA
I've posted this before, at least the photo, but what I carry at all times, as generally a one-man-business as of right now is:

Climbing saws:

12" Echo 2511T
14" Husky T540iXP (battery)
16" Stihl 200T

Ground/Rear handle saws:

14" Stihl HT133 (pole chainsaw)
16" Stihl 180
16" Husky 540i (battery)
18" Stihl 261
20" Stihl 361
28" Stihl 500i
36" Stihl 661

Then all my saws that have been 'replaced' with better saws sit at home in my basement on stand-by. Next on the list is probably a Stihl 400 to replace the 361, and the battery Husky pole saw which will be an addition, not a replacement to the more powerful gas pole chainsaw. I just love having the exact tool I want for every job.

000 saws 01.jpg
 

Birdyman88

Branched out member
Location
Arlington
Problem.....I was SMOKING my 355t doing this :/ I burnt-out a chain I'd put on right before the job (it got too hot and some of the links fused...oiler was working!) so I started letting it 'rest' after ~5min sessions (and would take smaller cuts with the 10"/25cc :p ) During one of these I'd gone to swap chains on the 355t and, inside the clutch-cover, was a gray-ish slurry....hard to think it was a result of anything but metal-shavings/dust :(
This sounds an awful lot like you are hitting something in tree - dirt, rocks, metal, etc. How close to the ground are you cutting? The closer you get to the ground, the more likely you're going to hit something bad. Because you mention "shared trunk", when you're done, you might check to see if there were rocks that got trapped between the two leaders way back when it was younger. Like others have said, the 355T should be able to cut whatever you put it in.
 

Lumberjack

Branched out member
Has anyone not over-barred a saw? Put on a longer bar than the saw is spec'd for? When I did that it worked fine as long as the chain was sharp. The cutting was only a little slower than I expected.
Yep, if it fits the bar mount and sprocket, it’ll pull it with no harm... as long as the chain is sharp.

Not a horrific example, but way back in the day I’d run 36” bar with normal (non skip chain) on an 044 in south east hardwoods... slow, but it works fine.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
From early days when I didn't have a fleet of saws. the bigger saws had died and I needed to finish a job.

While I was cutting I could feel a litle less cutting asnd my Dad's words of 'Let the saw do the work', given in my first shop projects as a four year old with a handsaw cutting boards.

As long as I didn't set the dogs and lever the bar into the cut it went just fine.
 

Frankie 1

New member
Location
Buffalo
A ported 261c , 462c make a nice 1,2 combo. For Husqvarner lovers the 550mark II and a 572xp will do the same. The 572xp is a fine saw when properly ported (not quite as quick as the 462c at least how I build em ) , the 550 also responds well to mods ... The 462c and 572xp saws will pull a 32” thru WNY hardwoods if needed on occasion
 

Tony

Branched out member
Location
Lancaster, PA
Yesterday while removing a pair (well, shared trunk-base!) of Pine-specie trees, each in the 50' range, I got it down to a ~15' "stump" trunk that I was going to fell. I removed my belt & spurs and realized, w/ my 42cc/18" still on the bench at-home, all I had was my 16" echo 355t (36cc)

Did 'beaver cuts' around the base, basically making two huge side face-cuts so I'd have the room to get my saw in to make the actual/true face and back cuts....if I didn't leave that much height on this leaning tree I don't know how I would've gotten it down, thankfully wedges let me basically plunge-cut / bore-cut my way through the center-wood of it!

Problem.....I was SMOKING my 355t doing this :/ I burnt-out a chain I'd put on right before the job (it got too hot and some of the links fused...oiler was working!) so I started letting it 'rest' after ~5min sessions (and would take smaller cuts with the 10"/25cc :p ) During one of these I'd gone to swap chains on the 355t and, inside the clutch-cover, was a gray-ish slurry....hard to think it was a result of anything but metal-shavings/dust :(

How do you know how hard to run your saws? I need to check-back to my "need a good BIG saw" thread & go purchase something new, just uncertain whether it's foolish to go for a ~60cc // 24" class unit, or if it's smarter to bite the bullet & go 75cc+ with 30"+....will need that soon enough anyway so a 60cc "in-between" seems wasteful..

Thanks for thoughts/input on how hard you push your gear, and what you're keeping in-mind & watching for while doing this!

(Context for saws-- I only run no-ethanol fuel with HP Ultra, I have clean air filters, only mods are muff & airflow & carb (and I run them 'normal' not fat or lean), and my "cut style" or approach is basically bury the bar while focusing on chain-speed, not letting it drop too far from 'ideal' IE not forcing my saw but also not "just letting it do its thing" either!)
If your sharpening and cutting skilld match your grammer and punctuation, I can see where you would have an issue.

This is straight up operator error and poor cutting. A bigger saw with a longer bar would just mean more teeth to file and possibly a heftier repair bill.

Tools don‘t make the worker…

Tony
 

evo

Been here a while
Location
My Island, WA
If your sharpening and cutting skilld match your grammer and punctuation, I can see where you would have an issue.

This is straight up operator error and poor cutting. A bigger saw with a longer bar would just mean more teeth to file and possibly a heftier repair bill.

Tools don‘t make the worker…

Tony
That was pretty cold. My grammar and spelling is beyond horrible, but just a tool to articulate myself. Due to many reasons I have a limited tool box but I sure as hell know how to work.
I have my judgements and they may or may not be correct.
there is no such thing as a stupid honest question.
I respect you Tony but your presence has certainly shifted over the years
 

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