?Kevlar kite string for throw line?

Marie Muma

New Member
Location
Port Townsend
We are wondering if Kevlar kite string can be used for an arborist throw line?? It comes in different strengths. We felt that 100lb strength would be more than enough needed. We are hoping that this might be more robust because we plan to leave it up in our Douglas Fir Tree which has a ”Permanent Friction Saver.” The price of this on Amazon is much less than the Capillary Throw Line that we bought from Wesspur. Does anyone have any thoughts??
 

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Marie Muma

New Member
Location
Port Townsend
The Kevlar is quite slippery. In answer to question about UV protection, I do not believe it is. I will not be throwing this line at all. It will just be installed onto our tree on a “permanent” basis. Does anyone have any recommendations?? I was wondering about 1/16 inch galvanized cable which probably does not flake, but could be put onto a spool?? 446E98CB-7EDC-40FA-92BB-5CEF0E251943.png
 

stheis004

Active Member
Location
WI
I've had old retired kite surfing line in my second throw cube for years and it basically performs the same as throw line. I'm not familiar with that particular line but just like throw line there are differences in characteristics one brand to another
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
I don’t know about the kite string, 100 pound break doesn’t seem like enough to me. I have done pullups on a throwline to get a rope up in a tree many times. And the cable worries me, cables fray when they’re worn or old, and those little strands will tear you all to pieces.

I would personally just use throwline. The line we use has a break strength of about 500 pounds, and costs about $for a 200’ length. There’s others that are cheaper, Gap Arborist has a 190 pound Weaver line at $12 for 150’ or $65 for 1000 ft, for example.
 

Marie Muma

New Member
Location
Port Townsend
I understand about needing a strong line IF one is going to use it in the typical way. My set-up is in place to raise my climbing line and the only “weight” I encounter is the weight of the climbing rope since its path has been cleared up to the top. I don’t believe that 1/16th inch stainless steel cable is going to fray. The other foto was galvanized steel cable, but I found stainless steel cable which is what I am thinking about now. I would only use it for this one application. D35DEF45-6013-45CB-B11D-1079743D350A.png
 

Marie Muma

New Member
Location
Port Townsend
We actually have a very large fishing reel called a “bait caster” that we are not using. The stainless steel cable is 1/16th of an inch which is about 1.5 mm. According to the specs on this reel, we could VERY EASILY get 150 feet on the reel. If this works, I will probably attach it somehow so that it is right next to the bin that stores our climbing rope during the times that we are not climbing it. When I am pulling the climbing rope back into the storage bin, it is a nice controlled process until the very end when the bitter end of the climbing rope comes “tumbling” down which can create havoc in a bait caster. As long as I control that last part by adjusting the drag, things should work quite well for this project. 3674F68B-685C-4EB4-8080-2B8D91C817AC.jpeg , things should go quite well. This is a “work in progress.”
 

Bart_

Active Member
Location
GTA
Watch for kinking or small sharp bends in the steel line. Could create a stress/fail point. Bare kevlar frays/fuzzes/snags. So does dyneema/spectra, I think thats why there's coating on regular throwline. Look how fuzzy it gets when the coating's gone. Regular throw-line's been figured out, maybe just economize your choice as much as possible. my 2 cents.
 

Marie Muma

New Member
Location
Port Townsend
The stainless cable is cheaper than the regular throwline we bought from Wesspur. The fishing reel is something we had collecting dust in the garage. I hear what you say about a potential for a “kink” in the stainless steel cable. With our application, I do not think that will happen since there will be a bit of tension on the wire at all times, being that we are using the fishing reel and not attempting to flake it into a container. We are going to set this up very soon, so I will give a report how this works. It would be nice to post a video, but maybe I can make a YouTube posting and then add the link to my posts on this website. The worse thing that can happen if this cable fails is that the climbing line will not be able to be raised and someone will have to somehow climb the 70 feet up to reposition a throw line through our Permanent Chain Friction Saver. Of course, that is what we are trying to avoid by wanting a more ”permanent“ retrieval/deployment line for our climbing rope.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
This is my favorite line for keeping rope positions that I want to reuse. It is a tougher/tighter cover weave and slightly thicker than paracord. Easy on the hands when you're pulling the rope up. It lasts for years, highly recommended for the use:
https://www.knotandrope.com/products/task-rope-3-16-x-1-000-spool

You can order by the foot as well. Thx for the reminder, need to order some again.
-AJ
 

Marie Muma

New Member
Location
Port Townsend
This tree is right next to my home on my private property, so I do not think there is any chance of that happening. However, Neon Green is probably not the greatest choice to use because it is not natural and would be an eyesore!! Camo color would blend in nicely. We will probably place a ”back-up“ line in the event of the steel cable failing. Thanks for you input.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
That line is nylon OVER polyester. It is my understanding that nylon is NOT UV resistant, but the polyester is. If I were going to use a line for this, I would probably use 100% polyester. Here is a 250 foot spool of Neon Yellow for $22: https://www.qualitynylonrope.com/1-8-polyester-rope-neon-yellow/

Yep, this is all relative and in percentages as far as UV degradation goes, polyester is effected too, just a little less than nylon. I can report from years of use for the purpose that the Knot and Ropes task rope is long lasting. When any cordage starts to degrade from UV exposure it is easily noticed as the hand feel changes, becomes noticeably less supple, at that point it still won't break pulling up a climbing rope but you know it's getting to be time to swap in fresh cordage.
-AJ
 

moss

Well-Known Member
I also worry about rodents biting into it for nesting purposes. They won’t be able to bite into steel.

To prevent rodent chewing handle your cordage with gloves on. Rodents are not interested in chewing syntheic fibers, they are interested in the salts transmitted from sweat on your hands to the cordage. They are very practical and efficient and do things for a reason ;-)
-AJ
 

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