Intro

Marshy

Member
Location
North East
Hello everyone, I'm new to the forum and new to climbing. Not new to sawing or falling but recently took the plunge, started a business and got insured for tree service and logging. I do a mix of jobs and typically fit in where people can handle their own material cleanup. From the little bit of climbing I've done, I like it a lot and cant wait to learn more. I definitely have the itch to continue. I'm looking forward to reading here and learning. My biggest shortcoming is probably the fact that I'm working without a groundie. If anyon has good advice how to manage rigging with little to no ground help i would appreciate it.

Shout out to @chipper1 for telling me about the forum.
 

Marshy

Member
Location
North East
Hey Marshy

Good to have you on

Old topics always bring up new ideas. There are some old threads about solo rigging.

How are you doing it now?
Great question and thanks for the welcome. I've only rigged two trees and had experienced help both times. I have a tree job coming up that a friend is going to help run the ropes but I don't have a reliable ground guy that I feel comfortable bringing with me on jobs regularly. I imagine there are going to be a lot of jobs that I cant rig by myself but any that I find that I can rig myself will be that much more without asking a friend for help.
 

Birdyman88

Well-Known Member
Location
Arlington
Welcome to the buzz. How long have you been climbing and what system are you using? What types of rigging are you familiar with? Any experience working ground or watching climbers? Just curious.
 

Marshy

Member
Location
North East
Welcome to the buzz. How long have you been climbing and what system are you using? What types of rigging are you familiar with? Any experience working ground or watching climbers? Just curious.
Well, I started DRT with a Blake's but just acquired a rope wrench. So now I'm climbing with the wrench on some Sampson Vortex Cool rope and need to get myself a double ended long lanyard... I don't have much familiarity with rigging. What little I've done has been natural crotch rigging, some with a block and an X ring... I have very limited experience and knowledge in this realm.

Don't let my location fool you, I'm in NY so have plenty of hard wood deciduous trees to work on.
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Location
SF Bay Area, CA
@southsoundtree talks about solo rigging fairly often.

Lawrence Schultz does a lot of incredible big rigging. One method he uses to amp up control of heavy weights is to fasten the rigging line to the tree after having run it through an X Rigging Ring that is attached to limb or log to be lowered. (In that instance line is then controlled by an experienced groundy and a 2 or 3 thousand dollar rigging device.)

The reason I bring that method up is a person could do solo rigging similar to that using 1/2 line and lighter slings with locking snaps on them. When your rigged piece gets to the ground you pull your 1/2 inch line out and set up the next piece. The lighter slings and snaps are also used as a part of a tool kit called "speedline". My speed line kit has about 30 light slings and maybe 10 heavier ones.

Speed lining would also be a way to solo rig out to a specific spot. So, for instance I could send about 40 pieces before even needing to consider going to the ground.

Welcome to TreeBuzz by the way.
 

Birdyman88

Well-Known Member
Location
Arlington
That's cool for being so honest.

If I may say suggest something just because you're starting out climbing. Always ask yourself why you are rigging out the piece the particular size and method you chose. If you're honest answer is because a weakness in your climbing wouldn't allow you to do it a more preferred way, then consider focusing more on your climbing. I was advised to take small pieces when I started climbing. Made me a damn good climber getting to all those places to make the cut, and of course allows me to be able to prune properly now. Take the big stuff when it makes sense though.
 

Marshy

Member
Location
North East
@southsoundtree talks about solo rigging fairly often.

Lawrence Schultz does a lot of incredible big rigging. One method he uses to amp up control of heavy weights is to fasten the rigging line to the tree after having run it through an X Rigging Ring that is attached to limb or log to be lowered. (In that instance line is then controlled by an experienced groundy and a 2 or 3 thousand dollar rigging device.)

The reason I bring that method up is a person could do solo rigging similar to that using 1/2 line and lighter slings with locking snaps on them. When your rigged piece gets to the ground you pull your 1/2 inch line out and set up the next piece. The lighter slings and snaps are also used as a part of a tool kit called "speedline". My speed line kit has about 30 light slings and maybe 10 heavier ones.

Speed lining would also be a way to solo rig out to a specific spot. So, for instance I could send about 40 pieces before even needing to consider going to the ground.

Welcome to TreeBuzz by the way.
Very interesting. If you can think of any good videos on YouTube or thread discussions on this please pass them on here and I will give a read. Theres a lot of new lingo and names for equipment that I still dont know yet but can pick up quick. Pictures are always helpful. I subscribed to EducatedClimber on youtube and a couple of others and I'm always looking for reputable guys to learn from.
 

Marshy

Member
Location
North East
That's cool for being so honest.

If I may say suggest something just because you're starting out climbing. Always ask yourself why you are rigging out the piece the particular size and method you chose. If you're honest answer is because a weakness in your climbing wouldn't allow you to do it a more preferred way, then consider focusing more on your climbing. I was advised to take small pieces when I started climbing. Made me a damn good climber getting to all those places to make the cut, and of course allows me to be able to prune properly now. Take the big stuff when it makes sense though.
Everyone has to start somewhere. I have no shame or ego in this arena. I want to stay alive, not damage property and execute for my customer, in that order or priority. I'm comfortable in my gear and at heights. I dont feel rushed and take time to consider forces at play, center of gravity, body positioning, line of fire and possibly alternative outcomes if it doesnt work like I have it thought out. I always say there are 3 way to learn, pay to get an education, trial and error or learn from others mistakes and successes. I preferr the prior and latter. LoL. Thanks for the insights.
 

Birdyman88

Well-Known Member
Location
Arlington
eryone has to start somewhere. I have no shame or ego in this arena. I want to stay alive, not damage property and execute for my customer, in that order or priority. I'm comfortable in my gear and at heights. I dont feel rushed and take time to consider forces at play, center of gravity, body positioning, line of fire and possibly alternative outcomes if it doesnt work like I have it thought out. I always say there are 3 way to learn, pay to get an education, trial and error or learn from others mistakes and successes. I preferr the prior and latter. LoL. Thanks for the insights.
Guess you'll be around the buzz for awhile, lol. Man, in addition to solo rig, really learn the art of cutting and chucking; of catching on a sling/rope and chucking; and of making really thoughtful cuts and just dropping in place. As for dropping in place, it can be destructive if you don't make the right cut, but done right, it is great for a solo flyer. There are all kinds of resources out there, but "The Fundamentals of General Tree Work" (Beranek) is a great one that discusses everything including cuts, drop in place, etc in detail with good technical explanations. The digital PDF download can be found here for like $20. Highly recommend it:
 

Marshy

Member
Location
North East
Guess you'll be around the buzz for awhile, lol. Man, in addition to solo rig, really learn the art of cutting and chucking; of catching on a sling/rope and chucking; and of making really thoughtful cuts and just dropping in place. As for dropping in place, it can be destructive if you don't make the right cut, but done right, it is great for a solo flyer. There are all kinds of resources out there, but "The Fundamentals of General Tree Work" (Beranek) is a great one that discusses everything including cuts, drop in place, etc in detail with good technical explanations. The digital PDF download can be found here for like $20. Highly recommend it:
Awesome, thanks for the material. I know what I'm asking Santa for. Yes, I've already learned that depending how a branch falls/lays it can have destructive tendencies. Trying to anticipate that is what I probably need the most work on right out of the gate.

I have a climb job this coming weekend and it's in a residential area, it's a twin stem and over hangs the other 3 neighboring properties. It's for a friend so hes willing to help with the rope but there is some that are going to have to land in the neighbors lawn and we will clean up after. I just dont want to damage the fence below. The branch work doesn't concern me too much on this job its chunking down the main stems and mitigating lawn impact in the neighbors lawn.
 

B_Strange

Well-Known Member
Location
Simmonsville
To chime in, I work mostly solo and can’t emphasize enough making perfect cuts every.single.time. Two other things I think about: big pieces big problems; little pieces little problems and slow is smooth and smooth is fast. Take your time and speed will come as skill increases. I’m new to the field as well. Oh, you probably are already but if not get insured. That warm cozy feeling of a well covered ass can’t be beat!
 

New threads New posts

Kask Stihl NORTHEASTERN Arborists Wesspur TreeStuff.com Kask Teufelberger Westminster X-Rigging Teufelberger Tracked Lifts Climbing Innovations
Top Bottom