I'm hitting the road

Sgfinco

Active Member
Getting a jump on this now, I've decided to hit the road contract climbing full time and skip going full tree service for now. I'll be leaving Wisconsin in February more than likely, I'll be traveling with a camper and my dog and looking to start working mainly in the south chasing good weather and great work.

I'm ISA certified, specialize in large tip reduction pruning but have the chops for large, technical removals. I'm well versed in crane work with both kbooms/treemeks and stick cranes. I have a class a CDL as well.

I've been climbing for 7 or so years now, been a full time contract climber for the last year, and have been contracting part time for the last three. I don't know everything, I still have plenty to learn, no one climbs trees without an ego but I think I keep mine in check pretty well.

I'm fully insured, general liability and workers comp insurance. I'll be looking to keep my schedule about two or three weeks out, trying to keep a decent route around the country worked out.

Check out my Instagram @samfinco and my youtube: samfinco for examples of my work.

Pm for pricing and I'm happy to answer any questions you may have here.

Thanks.
 

TreeCo

Well-Known Member
How do you know the skill level of the ground people you work with?

Seems it puts you and others at great risk.
 

Sgfinco

Active Member
How do you know the skill level of the ground people you work with?

Seems it puts you and others at great risk.
As a contract climber you don't, that's why it's important to talk to your ground guys before the work starts, get a feel for the skill level, start small and work your way up to bigger rigging. If they're really bad I'll rely on self rigging or happily rig down firewood until my 8 hours are up.
 

southsoundtree

Well-Known Member
As a contract climber you don't, that's why it's important to talk to your ground guys before the work starts, get a feel for the skill level, start small and work your way up to bigger rigging. If they're really bad I'll rely on self rigging or happily rig down firewood until my 8 hours are up.
Sometimes, self-run rigging is way easier on everyone, and safer.
No
"subcommittee meetings",
inexperienced workers accidentally lowering the piece into a crotch,
inexperienced workers not being able to read the timing on swinging pieces into a landing zone, waiting, and slacking at just the right time to let gravity land it where you want.

When you are controlling both components, you can rig and cut for your to be able to finesse the landing.

If you can't get it to land favorably, you stop it before touch-down. The workers on the ground aren't fighting a rope in the dropzone and down 1/2 to a full worker who is dealing with the rope.


Sometimes, landing some climber-rigged pieces with finesse will show the ground-crew how to not fight the tide.
 

CanadianStan

Well-Known Member
How do you know the skill level of the ground people you work with?

Seems it puts you and others at great risk.
You assess every crew day by day ... I like to ask them their experience levels, what equipment they're familiar with (Port-a-wrap? GRCS?), see if they're familiar with speedlines, etc.

As a contract climber I modulate the level of technical climbing to match not only the skill level of the crews I'm working with, but also the size of the crew and the machinery on site (6" chipper and 100 ft drag vs 18" chipper with skidsteer).
 

J&DTREEPROS

New Member
@Sgfinco We are always looking for a good climber to help us out! We will have a brand new 110 ton crane in early next year along with our 90 ton so there will be plenty of fun to be had here in Raleigh North Carolina! Give us a call and lets set something up 919-467-7997
 
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