I made up this friction hitch (but I'm sure it's not original). What is it?

dmonn

Active Member
Location
Mequon
Yesterday I just started wrapping and tucking and came up with the friction hitch shown. It's kind of like a Michoacan, but not really (I don't think). It worked great. Anybody recognize it as a previously named hitch?
 

Attachments

  • Hitch 1.jpeg
    Hitch 1.jpeg
    910.2 KB · Views: 69
  • Hitch 2.jpeg
    Hitch 2.jpeg
    214.8 KB · Views: 68
  • Hitch 3.jpeg
    Hitch 3.jpeg
    1.2 MB · Views: 61
  • Hitch 4.jpeg
    Hitch 4.jpeg
    909.1 KB · Views: 71

Cereal_Killer

Well-Known Member
Location
Ohio
Not calling you out at all, you say it works [for you] and I don't doubt that but personally I never got any hitch where the legs come off the same direction to function even remotely good enough on a hitchhiker. Everything I've read and my own findings always led me to believe you need the legs to go up opposite sides of the body for it to release worth a damn.
 

dmonn

Active Member
Location
Mequon
Try it and see. I didn't give it a lot of time up and down, but it released surprisingly well. I too thought you needed the legs to come from opposite sides on the HH, and was actually pleasantly surprised that it worked. I'd love for others to try it and comment.
 

dmonn

Active Member
Location
Mequon
Looking at the photos, if I try it again I think I'll give it one more wrap. As Brocky said, it's an asymmetrical prussik. (Surprised I didn't see that before he replied). I think another wrap might make it work better. As I think back, it seemed to release and grab pretty suddenly. Another wrap might make that a little more gradual/controlled. I think that would make it a schwabisch?
 

dmonn

Active Member
Location
Mequon
I tried it again today with one more wrap. It was harder to tend and harder to release. It also still grabbed and released more suddenly than I like. A michoacan is a much better hitch for me.
 

agent_smith

Active Member
Location
Townsville
Hello dmonn,
Your presentation (initial post) is not Tiable In the Bight (TIB) to the 'host' rope and therefore it is not any version of a Prusik hitch (#1763). The Prusik hitch is TIB and symmetric (written as; "symmetric 3/3 TIB").
Your presentation is "asymmetric 4/1 non-TIB".

All slide and grip hitches can be broadly classified into the following classes:
[ ] TIB (ie TIB to the host rope) - more common with mountaineers/climbers
[ ] Non TIB - more common with tree climbers

With the following sub classes:
[ ] symmetric
[ ] asymmetric

Geometry is described by arrangement of the coils (which can be 'S' or 'Z' chirality) and exiting load bearing 'legs'.
For example, a Klemheist (#1762) is written as: "asymmetric 5/1 TIB" or "asymmetric 7/1 TIB" (must be odd number).

And a 'Distel hitch' would be: "asymmetric 4/1 non-TIB" (although as with all slide and grip hitches, it is possible to vary the geometry to 3/1 or even 5/1...which is 'best' will be derived according to rope material frictive properties and host-to-hitch diameter ratio).

NOTE: 'TIB' means that the hitch can be tied to its host rope without access to either end (and the reverse also applies, in that the hitch can be untied and removed from the 'host' without access to either end). 'Either end' in this case refers to the hitch cord. Some knot geeks prefer to define this as; 'without access to any end' - to rule out feeding one end of your host rope into the hitch!

Chirality is rarely reported... tie your favorite slide and grip hitch and then hold it adjacent to a plane mirror...the mirror reflection you see is the inverse of what you tied - and it is just as valid. For example, if you normally tie a 'Distel hitch' with 'S' chirality - hold it up to a mirror and you will see opposite 'Z' chirality.

EDIT:
I encourage you to keep experimenting, because you might discover a new geometry that revolutionizes non-mechanical rope ascending systems... (and become famous like Elon Musk).
 

moss

Well-Known Member
Hello dmonn,
Your presentation (initial post) is not Tiable In the Bight (TIB) to the 'host' rope and therefore it is not any version of a Prusik hitch (#1763). The Prusik hitch is TIB and symmetric (written as; "symmetric 3/3 TIB").
Your presentation is "asymmetric 4/1 non-TIB".

All slide and grip hitches can be broadly classified into the following classes:
[ ] TIB (ie TIB to the host rope) - more common with mountaineers/climbers
[ ] Non TIB - more common with tree climbers

With the following sub classes:
[ ] symmetric
[ ] asymmetric

Geometry is described by arrangement of the coils (which can be 'S' or 'Z' chirality) and exiting load bearing 'legs'.
For example, a Klemheist (#1762) is written as: "asymmetric 5/1 TIB" or "asymmetric 7/1 TIB" (must be odd number).

And a 'Distel hitch' would be: "asymmetric 4/1 non-TIB" (although as with all slide and grip hitches, it is possible to vary the geometry to 3/1 or even 5/1...which is 'best' will be derived according to rope material frictive properties and host-to-hitch diameter ratio).

NOTE: 'TIB' means that the hitch can be tied to its host rope without access to either end (and the reverse also applies, in that the hitch can be untied and removed from the 'host' without access to either end). 'Either end' in this case refers to the hitch cord. Some knot geeks prefer to define this as; 'without access to any end' - to rule out feeding one end of your host rope into the hitch!

Chirality is rarely reported... tie your favorite slide and grip hitch and then hold it adjacent to a plane mirror...the mirror reflection you see is the inverse of what you tied - and it is just as valid. For example, if you normally tie a 'Distel hitch' with 'S' chirality - hold it up to a mirror and you will see opposite 'Z' chirality.

EDIT:
I encourage you to keep experimenting, because you might discover a new geometry that revolutionizes non-mechanical rope ascending systems... (and become famous like Elon Musk).
"Chirality"! Excellent term, thx for the addition to my vocabulary. As a lefty I'm definitely a chiral type of human ;-) As of course right-handed people are as well.
-AJ
 

dmonn

Active Member
Location
Mequon
I couldn't find a reference for a "Z" chirality. Only S and R. They seem to be backwards from the fingers of our hands when our thumbs are pointed up. The fingers of my right hand have "S" chirality because they wrap around the host rope to the left, and vice versa. So my hitch was tied with S Chirality. I assume "Z" would be the same as "R".

My aunt taught me how to remember your right hand from your left. "Your right hand has your left thumb on it, and your left hand has your right thumb on it. Just don't turn your hands palm up or you'll get confused". She was awesome!
 

New threads New posts

Kask Stihl NORTHEASTERN Arborists Wesspur TreeStuff.com Kask Teufelberger Westminster X-Rigging Teufelberger Tracked Lifts Climbing Innovations
Top Bottom