How do you add value?

ROYCE

Well-Known Member
I am really trying to tighten up my sales approach. One thing I want to think about is how to add value to my current services. Maybe I am already doing that. But, when someone calls me and is looking for an estimate for tree removal, how can I separate myself from my competition and make this potential consumer aware of the value that I add? Here are a few things that I think can add value? These are what we currently do.
1. Fast response to their initial call
2. Appointment set up with a certified arborist, and we are on time with a clean presentation
3. Well written estimate.
4. Best price for the job. Meaning we are giving them the best value for their dollar. (how are we doing this?)
5. If hired, we show up on time with nice equipment
6. All crew is in uniforms and are polite
7. We execute the job as described on the work order.

What else can add value to a potential customer. Also how do you make them aware that they are receiving good value for their dollar?
 

RopeShield

Well-Known Member
Are you trying to sell a removal or are they already sold on the removal.
cheapest almost always wins. take what you can and leave nothing.
 

ROYCE

Well-Known Member
Are you trying to sell a removal or are they already sold on the removal.
cheapest almost always wins. take what you can and leave nothing.
Typically 90% of the work we do is removals. Of those about 85% of the people already have their mind set that they want the tree removed. 5% of the time I can talk them into preservation work to keep the tree.
Of the 85% removals we do their is often 3 or 4 bids to remove the same tree. One thing that has separated us from our competition is our ability to be super efficient. We roll to the job with crane, log truck, chipper with chip truck, and bucket truck with tractor or skid steer. We crank the job out and get onto the next.
I was just trying to think of ways to add value, or make the cusomter aware of the value we provide to secure us those jobs.
 

monkeylove

Well-Known Member
Maybe a portfolio book that has past jobs. Show the before and after noting how well the site was left. Maybe some equipment pics showing how there was minimal impact to the track flow for customers who live on roads or in quiet communities. It is a tough sell no matter how you look at Royce. Unfortunately many customers look at a removal like they are just scrapping and old car, as long as it's gone they are happy. Adding value to something that is leaving is a tough nut and most customers have no idea what is envolved in removing a tree safely.

To play devils advocate and maybe get your brain thinking on the subject so you can maybe get some bullet points......

Explain to me why as a customer I would care about anything you mentioned, as long as my tree was gone when you finished for the day.

Not fighting you Royce, just trying to get some thoughts going. :birra:
 

ROYCE

Well-Known Member
Maybe a portfolio book that has past jobs. Show the before and after noting how well the site was left. Maybe some equipment pics showing how there was minimal impact to the track flow for customers who live on roads or in quiet communities. It is a tough sell no matter how you look at Royce. Unfortunately many customers look at a removal like they are just scrapping and old car, as long as it's gone they are happy. Adding value to something that is leaving is a tough nut and most customers have no idea what is envolved in removing a tree safely.

To play devils advocate and maybe get your brain thinking on the subject so you can maybe get some bullet points......

Explain to me why as a customer I would care about anything you mentioned, as long as my tree was gone when you finished for the day.

Not fighting you Royce, just trying to get some thoughts going. :birra:
Okay, great!! I guess I would ask, is the bigger picture important to you as a consumer? What I mean is....do you care about the fact that I pay my employees an above average salary. That they make enough money to pay their bills, put their kids through college, go on vacation ,and support our local economy? We are fully insured to protect both you and your property, and my employees should they be injured on the job.
Your tree is gone, but the process has been painless. We did not come and remove half of it one one day, and then return three weeks later to remove the second half. Your property was left untouched. No ruts in the lawn, damage to nearby trees or structures. The crew was very pleasant to deal with, very professional.
Whatever we said we wold do, we have done. We arrived on the day and at the time we said we would. You were invoiced a bill for the exact same amount that was quoted to you by the salesman.
You could rest assured that the company that spent the day at your house was representing you in a positive way. When you hire us, we spend the day at your house and all your friends and neighbors see who you choose to hire for your tree removal services ( that is a direct reflection of you) . Our equipment is tidy, crew is all in uniform, and we are efficient and profession to watch work. We are not like a bunch of convicts that just hopped off a bus in ratty old clothes smoking, scramming and fighting with each other all day.
Now, what happens if something goes wrong? What happens if a go gets smashed through your house? Our relationship might just get a whole lot closer. Who would you want to go through a situation like that with? A respectable person with morals and a good attitude...or someone else?
I could think of more, but you have my brain thinking now!! What are your thoughts? Would any of this really resonate with you? Or, are you just looking for the lowest price?
 

RopeShield

Well-Known Member
Pick up garbage, edge a gdn bed, sidewalk, driveway, pull some weeds, tidy up prune dw , mulch something. Sweep the curb
When the client asks you to leave mb then that's too much
 

Treezybreez

Well-Known Member
"The personal touch" I find that giving loyal clients a bird house made from wood I had milled, or a turning a bowl from their own tree, or giving them a jar of home made apple butter, lets the client know that I care about them on a personal level. Also whenever they see the bird house they think about me and my services. I can't tell you how many referrals result from this approach.
 

monkeylove

Well-Known Member
Okay, great!! I guess I would ask, is the bigger picture important to you as a consumer? What I mean is....do you care about the fact that I pay my employees an above average salary. That they make enough money to pay their bills, put their kids through college, go on vacation ,and support our local economy? We are fully insured to protect both you and your property, and my employees should they be injured on the job.
Your tree is gone, but the process has been painless. We did not come and remove half of it one one day, and then return three weeks later to remove the second half. Your property was left untouched. No ruts in the lawn, damage to nearby trees or structures. The crew was very pleasant to deal with, very professional.
Whatever we said we wold do, we have done. We arrived on the day and at the time we said we would. You were invoiced a bill for the exact same amount that was quoted to you by the salesman.
You could rest assured that the company that spent the day at your house was representing you in a positive way. When you hire us, we spend the day at your house and all your friends and neighbors see who you choose to hire for your tree removal services ( that is a direct reflection of you) . Our equipment is tidy, crew is all in uniform, and we are efficient and profession to watch work. We are not like a bunch of convicts that just hopped off a bus in ratty old clothes smoking, scramming and fighting with each other all day.
Now, what happens if something goes wrong? What happens if a go gets smashed through your house? Our relationship might just get a whole lot closer. Who would you want to go through a situation like that with? A respectable person with morals and a good attitude...or someone else?
I could think of more, but you have my brain thinking now!! What are your thoughts? Would any of this really resonate with you? Or, are you just looking for the lowest price?
I like it Royce and it would mean something to me. I will have more later to add, let me think about it some over the day.
 

ROYCE

Well-Known Member
"The personal touch" I find that giving loyal clients a bird house made from wood I had milled, or a turning a bowl from their own tree, or giving them a jar of home made apple butter, lets the client know that I care about them on a personal level. Also whenever they see the bird house they think about me and my services. I can't tell you how many referrals result from this approach.
We stated giving clients a jar of homemade maple syrup after the job is completed.
 

Gorman

Well-Known Member
I personally find that clients hold us in higher regard when we give them honest advise regarding removals. A lot of times intel people "you don't need to remove that oak, maybe prune and cable" and all of a sudden I have a client for life.
 

96coal449

Well-Known Member
Royce, this is something my partner used to do. He'd withhold the names and address of the clients for the past year. Then 2-3wks before Christmas he'd send everyone a simple card. Gives the personal connection previously described and generated a lot of referrals.
 

ROYCE

Well-Known Member
That's a real nice thing to do. But how much syrup do you have stockpiled for all your jobs?
I have about 10 gallons that I have boiled down this year. I break it out into smaller size glass jars. All it really costs me is my time on the weekend(my wife and I do this together, so its quality time with the family) and the price of the glass jars that the business pays for.
 

matdand

Active Member
Maybe a portfolio book that has past jobs. Show the before and after noting how well the site was left. Maybe some equipment pics showing how there was minimal impact to the track flow for customers who live on roads or in quiet communities. It is a tough sell no matter how you look at Royce. Unfortunately many customers look at a removal like they are just scrapping and old car, as long as it's gone they are happy. Adding value to something that is leaving is a tough nut and most customers have no idea what is envolved in removing a tree safely.

To play devils advocate and maybe get your brain thinking on the subject so you can maybe get some bullet points......

Explain to me why as a customer I would care about anything you mentioned, as long as my tree was gone when you finished for the day.

Not fighting you Royce, just trying to get some thoughts going. :birra:
This is what I want to instore this season:

1- Client calls and talks to office assistant. The assistant answers all the general questions and takes down information.
2- Client and assistant schedule an appointment.
3- An email is immediatly sent to the client confirming the information for the appointment. Attached to the email is a pdf brochure of all our services and info about the company.

This way, the client has time to read up on the company and knows what to expect when the sales person shows up.

What do ya think?
 

Jasonk

Active Member
In the biz of removals price usually wins. Keep in mind though there are certainly exceptions to the rule. Many times we can sell a low impact process meaning after we leave you won't need to have a new lawn installed etc. Also, sell your crane.....Make people understand that you are going to be faster and again less impact. When you can sell tree care you can charge real money by selling your knowledge and thats exactly what you need to do. "You should hire us because we know and will provide whats best for your trees, not whats easiest for us to do".
 

rope-a-dope

Well-Known Member
We have newsletters that go out to customers and communities in general. They are a mixture of informative, educational, personable, and fun little "articles" that usually come out quarterly.
Doing stuff that goes beyond customers gives you value to people that haven't even hired you yet. Community advocacy can be powerful.
The maple syrup is a nice touch!
 
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