Harness Sliding up

Dav Re

New Member
Hello. I climb trees recreationally. I also do some very light pruning (e.g. small dead limbs). I am in a New Tribe
Progear II Arborist Saddle. One of the issues I am having with this saddle (and had with the New Tribe beginner's saddle) is that the waist belt slides up my torso. The belt then reaches my belly (around the navel) and I cannot breath so well. I do not plan on purchasing a different harness. Does someone have some pointers here for me regarding the belt creep and breathing?

-Dave
 
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TreeLogic

Well-Known Member
Hmmmm...never tried New Tribe but have heard nothing but good things. Odd thing is, in my experience at least, your issue is exactly opposite of production climbers. Our saddles usually get pulled down. My guess is that body type will play a part in finding the right saddle for you.

Can we have a little more info? Is this happening during ascent, when lanyard is on, when standing on a limb, etc? Thanks.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
That's typical for NT harnesses, except for say the Onyx which is different than the standard NT saddle design. Try shortening your leg straps an inch or 2, if you're tilted back a hair the waist belt will stay closer to your hips better.
-AJ
 

monkeylove

Well-Known Member
Have an Onyx, Yellow Jacket and Treefox. I will politely disagree with Moss on shortening the leg straps for the moment. First I would start with them long enough to touch the back of your knees. Hang in it and test it out. Then move them shorter about 1/2" and repeat until it seems good. Of course none of this will work if you are talking about the D-rings pinching when on a lanyard. If that is the case then Moss is correct, and shortening may help but they are going to pinch. The 3 I mentioned are all very comfortable once they are dialed in. Yours should be but it will take little tweaks at a time to find the sweet spot. Certainly call NT and chat with them, no one is better at figuring out their harnesses than they are. And they're nice guys to boot.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
Yep, start with the bottom of the leg pads back of the knee. If you shorten the straps a little from there the waist belt will be more limited in upward movement but, too much and the leg straps will be digging in the wrong places. Climbers with more "girth" on their upper bodies notice the lung constricting effect from the rising NT waist belt. Skinny climbers like me don't notice it. I've put a lot of climbers on rope in NT harnesses, the heavier climbers suffer more from upper body constriction. There may not be a solution as that type of NT harness doesn't have much adjustment besides the leg straps. In the long run if you don't solve the constriction problems you'll probably be better off with a harness that grabs the hips better, like the NT Onyx, Petzl Sequoia, Tree Motion, etc.
-AJ
 
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Dav Re

New Member
Can we have a little more info? Is this happening during ascent, when lanyard is on, when standing on a limb, etc? Thanks.
Really appreciate the prompt feedback. Thank you. Will get to try these suggestions this weekend (low and slow). As to Tree Logic's Q: I am 5'9", 158. Slight belly, mostly thin. The constriction occurs during the ascent, not at all during a descent. Standing on a limb does not reproduce the issue. The constriction also occurs while tied in with a lanyard on the D rings if my body is below parallel to the ground. I figure this is just the way it is with D rings. I thought of somehow clipping the belt buckle with a shackle (maybe) to some part lower down on the harness to keep the belt from riding up. Perhaps this will result in a backwards tilt which would be unsafe. Do not want to try this without feedback from the pros. I climb trees where I usually have a 20'-30' ascent before I reach a limb. So, for me at this stage in my climbing strength and ability, about 10-15 minutes of sitting time in the harness before I can get to a limb. (A small amount of time but that is all it takes to get my heart rate up too high and oxygen intake too low.) I am ok from there since limbs are much closer together higher up. I understand this may not be the harness for me, but I liked the price, back support, attachment points, leg buckles, leg straps, and definitely New Tribe's customer service skills. I will call them for support as well.
 

moss

Well-Known Member
I was going to mention what you actually suggested, changing your tie-in point forward. That's what I did on the NT Tengu I climbed on for years. This is for DRT with a split-tail, I attached the carabiner holding the split-tail to my leg strap D, the other leg of the rope attached with a carabiner to the usual place, the delta. I checked with NT on this configuration and they gave it the ok, the leg strap D is rated to life support quality.

As far as lanyards an side D's go, you are correct, hanging off side D's is very uncomfortable in any saddle, only use when you're implementing your lanyard horizontally. I clip my harness in center on NT harnesses most of the time, that way it's very comfortable no matter where I attach the lanyard to a tree.
-AJ
 
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