getting used to climbing with spurrs

treesap

Participating member
Location
east TN
ive been practicing climbing on spurrs for a while now, still getting a little nervous, especially on hardwoods or small trees with lots of lean, and spiking down sucks, so far I have almost stopped gaffing out (Found out that if I stop letting my nerves get to me, I step harder, and flip my lanyard harder and faster, making everything go smoother)

any advice? also, spinning around a spar is not as easy for me as it should be (Nerves)
 

treesap

Participating member
Location
east TN
There is great value in repetition. Keep practicing and you’ll surprise yourself.
ive been practicing when I can, was showing my grandma some stuff the other day, did about 30ft on a ~16" poplar, was good, didnt get nervous at all, although I could have gone much higher (Probably 40-45) I wasnt going to push my luck, especially since it was above the only limb suitable for a tie in to descend
 

dspacio

Participating member
Location
Narragansett Bay

treesap

Participating member
Location
east TN
i have only about an hour of instruction by a friend and just learn everything else by going for it.
same here, been practicing low and slow, and figuring out what gear works for me, I might see if my one arborist friend can come out and give me some pointers on using spikes, they are defiantly NOT working how I imagined, since every tree is different, each gaff is different, each human is different, they wont work the exact same for each person, I suppose get the basics and practice, practice some more, and repeat
 

dmonn

Participating member
Location
Mequon
"Use a link between the two parts of the lanyard either side of the stem. For example, a low diameter (min. 6 mm diameter) Prusik loop with a carabiner on it. This link can be pushed up against the stem, which prevents a sliding fall. In France, for instance, this is a legal obligation defined in legislation"

This is from TimKilpatrick's link. I'm not sure how this is set up. Does the prussik loop encircle both sides of the lanyard when it's double looped, or is this something you might use if you don't double loop the lanyard? The carabiner gets hooked to your bridge? Sorry if this is obvious. I'm feeling a little thick-headed from too much fun yesterday.
 

Tuebor

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
Here
"Use a link between the two parts of the lanyard either side of the stem. For example, a low diameter (min. 6 mm diameter) Prusik loop with a carabiner on it. This link can be pushed up against the stem, which prevents a sliding fall. In France, for instance, this is a legal obligation defined in legislation"

This is from TimKilpatrick's link. I'm not sure how this is set up. Does the prussik loop encircle both sides of the lanyard when it's double looped, or is this something you might use if you don't double loop the lanyard? The carabiner gets hooked to your bridge? Sorry if this is obvious. I'm feeling a little thick-headed from too much fun yesterday.
An example:
 

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Jonny

Been here a while
Location
Buffalo
Neat... can get the same effect with just a spare split tail or prusik and biner, yeah? Or if you’re rolling in cash, get the Teufelberger Hipstar lanyard, comes with the thimble prusik.

Pretty basic technique but worth mentioning; wrap your lanyard 540 degrees on the spar. That along with using the balls of my feet to aid balance has been good enough for me so far, but I’ll keep that prusik idea in mind anyways.
 

rico

Been here a while
Location
redwoods
If your gonna become a good spur climber you must learn to OWN your flip-line. Make it your bitch.. None of this pushing it up the tree nonsense. You shoud be able to roll it up to at least shoulder height, which in turn creates a nice pendulum point to work off of as you explode up and out... Not just up...Up and out...

To do all this you must run more slack in your flipline than most are accustomed to..Takes more grip and upper back strength, but is integral to becoming truly fluid and mobile in spurs...

Your step should be fairly light. Jamming your spurs in too hard is inefficient, unproductive, and will lead to fatigue very quickly....No bueno.


 

Jonny

Been here a while
Location
Buffalo
Your step should be fairly light. Jamming your spurs in too hard is inefficient, unproductive, and will lead to fatigue very quickly....No bueno.

The stomping and subsequent yanking is murder to one’s joints too. Nobody’s legs are supposed to see hard, yanking, pull forces like that, and I’m certain the stomping push force is not good.. An old coworker of mine had these shitty dull Klein’s that needed that kind of force to function. He made them work, he was a good capable climber, but wouldn't ya know he’s having hip and knee pain before he’s 40 years old?

For most trees around here, just stepping up with my body weight is sufficient to set the gaff deep enough.
 

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