Gear Inspection

NickfromWI

Well-Known Member
Howsabout a thread where we share things that passed gear inspection that you didn't think would, or things that didn't pass that you thought should've.

Personally, I was suprised that at my first comp they didn't call me on my bridge connected to my Master II. 2 people looked at it and didn't even raise an eyebrow. I was happy!

love
nick

ps- I thought this would be good to help those going in to their first comps to know what the judges are looking for.
 

Mark Chisholm

Administrator
Administrator
This is more of a general statement, but I hate when something is fine one year (or more) and then not allowed the next. The biggest kicker on that one is when no mention of the banning of a common item or technique is made before you arrive for the comp. That really stinks.
 

Mangoes

Well-Known Member
2 years ago I had some 'volunteers' checking my gear, old Hydro One buys who hadn't climbed in a while. They let me thru with my 'camming device' for my lanyard, no questions asked. /forum/images/graemlins/laugh.gif
I was using the fabulous ROPEMAN! /forum/images/graemlins/grin.gif
Great device just gotta know its limits, which happen to be 15kn.
 

NickfromWI

Well-Known Member
Ok, so the Ropeman is okay for competition. I'll add that one to the list. /forum/images/graemlins/wink.gif

FWIW, they didn't let me use my Tylaska J-Lock to connect my footlock prusik to my harness, on the grounds that it is not auto-locking.

love
nick
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
The issue of the replacement bridge on the Butterfly came up again at the ITCC again this year. Forutnately I was able to go into the TB archives and find the original article that came from Komet telling which method was OK.

At a chapter level there are some real problems with the knowledge of the inspectors. Too bad. Gear check is a very complex issue. One of the most helpful things that can be asked is to have people who are familiar with new techniques and equipment to help with gear check.

When I was in MN we got fed-up with people showing up with butt strap saddles that didn't have the light weight leg straps to keep the butt strap in place. The old sui-slide saddles. We made a point to let everyone know during the gear check that the next year those saddles would not be allowed even though they are OK in OSHA/ANSI standards. WE also made a note about the change in the info packet the next year. We didn't have any grumblings.
 

didjon

Member
Hi Nick,
The one thing I would say with the ropeman is it only has a 15kn axle rating as Mangoes has said.. So used as a primary connecter would be under industry standard.You could argue the case that used on a lanyard side to side would be half load therefore giving you a 30kn tensile load on the system.I would hazard a guess thats why they let it by...
Used as a primary 1-1 direct would most definitly be questionable?????

Didj
 

Mangoes

Well-Known Member
They let the ropeman by due to a lack of knowledge. I was prepared to swap it for another device, but they let it thru, so .....ok. The ropeman is an awesome lanyard adjuster, I wish they made a 'legal' version.
 

Gareth

New Member
The legal version is probably the lock jack (albeit different make !)
I always get eyebrows lifting and discussions going when they check my gear because alot of it is home made stuff.One day i'll throw in my old original harness for fun as it was made by a paragliding company !
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
I wonder how a rope or tied webbing saddle would be greeted at gear inspection. There are probably some people out there that would be confused about allowing a "home made" saddle. :)
 

rborist1

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
The ropeman is an awesome lanyard adjuster, I wish they made a 'legal' version.

[/ QUOTE ]

Why isn't the use of ropeman considered legal (I know it's rating)? If the end of the lanyard is terminated on a rated loop on the harness it should be legal, shouldn't it? If the ropman were to fail you would still be tied in to the rated loop. If the lanyards tail was not fixed to a rated loop and was just "dangling" there and the ropeman were to fail, that would be a different story.
 

frans

Active Member
[ QUOTE ]
I wonder how a rope or tied webbing saddle would be greeted at gear inspection. There are probably some people out there that would be confused about allowing a "home made" saddle. :)

[/ QUOTE ]

A home made saddle is sewn by an individual, and the hardware would be hand assembled from off the shelf components. Because the entire set up would not have the 'proper safety certifications' (CE, ANSI) I would imagine the saddle would not pass gear inspections. For example the B'fly bridge modifications were not allowed.

Tom Ness from New Tribe had to go through the cert. process to get his saddles passed and to have the 'tag' sewn on them to prove they were safe. The funny thing is, the test was a controlled drop into the climbing line. IF the saddle did'nt tear, the saddle was deemed safe. Only Tom could not simply do the test himself, it had to be done at the lab in order to get a little tag sewn onto the back of the saddle.

Frans
 

klimbinfool

New Member
Nick ,
The competition you competed in is a little more lax on some of the eqiptment. being its not the western chapt. or ITCC, thier not going to hammer you on something such as your bridge knowing it has been let through before in main competitions.
Gear inspection Judges very all the time. I had a flip line I made last year made of 7/16 static. cross stitched @ the clip end and tail, whipped and then heated wrapped. It didnt fly because they couldnt see the stitching. So i brought out another flip made of 16 strand.Which i always stitch and then whip over the top. They said only if we know its stitched you can use it. So being a little pissed I stitched it again a they never looked at it a secound time..

My argument to them was, my fliplies 16 strand are back sppliced all the way to the end, 7 o 8 '. crap that thing will never pull out.

Now on the other hand, climbers got to climb on ropes that just had whipped ends...Go figure...

Have to play the game if ya want to compete I suppose..

Greg
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Frans,

My imagineary saddle woudl be tied as a threeloop bowline or Swiss seat out of normal climbing rope. I'll bet dollars to donuts that if someone showed up with a saddle like this that it would have some gear inspectors, at chapter and International events completely flummuxed. That would be humorous because it is the most basic climbing systms made from normal pieces of gear. There would be no basis for not allowing a rope or webbing saddle in the comps but I'm sure someone would find a way to try. :)
 

didjon

Member
Hi Tom The most important thing I would fail it on.Is the breath of load bearing parts,
Needs to be a minimum of 43mm to meet standards.Could use a tug rope I surpose,I reckon you might have a job getting knots init
and standing up when you got it on might be a problem....

Didj
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Right now there is no standard in place for harnesses. That's a long story. The standard that expired would be the one that would be used.

The regulations that we have for gear is a bit more relaxed than what I know about UK and Europe.

It seems that 2" wide webbing would meet the requirement though. I'm being a bit facetious with this line, I hope you understand :)
 
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