Fertilizer System

KevinS

Well-Known Member
Location
ontario
As of now we don’t do enough fertilizing to justify the price of a nice mounted rig. We have been using the spikes and hammering them in. I’m not against the solid fertilizer I’ve even read the argument that using them in the fall is beneficial because they can break down in deposits instead of moving with the flush of the thaws.
However for spring fertilizing I find myself liking the water soluble system for ease of distribution on site.
I understand liking both makes me a bit hypocritical but I can see the justification in each argument.
We only have a handful of clients and my own trees sometimes.
What I have done in the past is very low budget. More or less I have a barrel with a tap at the bottom (think rain barrel) that and 3-4’ of hose I used to put the barrel on the lawn tractor wagon giving me good drainage fall and I apply topically or into a diverse hole I pound in.
Fairly quick, easy, cheap but no pressure and you have to stir it often to suspend the fertilizer.

Any thoughts or ideas about how to keep it simple but make it a better system?

compressed air injection seemed like it wouldn’t add as much as you’d lose. Nothing wrong with it for a $20 system but I like to keep my ideas open.

Thanks for your ideas
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
A basic garden hose connected injector, attached to your water barrel through a 12 volt sprayer pump from tractor supply.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
I saw those with about 60 psi is that sufficient for a probe?
I would say it should be; normal residential well water pressure is 40-60 psi, and those probes are designed to work from a garden hose. There are bigger pumps that push closer to 100 psi if you’re worried about it, but I would think 60 is enough as long as you buy one that pushes sufficient volume, which is probably not a lot for one of those probes.
 

KevinS

Well-Known Member
Location
ontario
Does anyone price fertilizing like stumps and $/“ dbh? Or do you $/‘ of drip line , etc? I’m looking to streamline my pricing procedure

Thanks
 

macrocarpa

Well-Known Member
Location
Midwest
Yes, I base it on $/DBH. The more inches I reduce the price to what I consider reasonable and if its just one small tree I have to make it worth the time as well.

I just noticed this post but these soil injectors make fertilizing very simple. Of course making large mulch rings and applying compost annually is the best solution, but convincing customers of this is a different story.

I have the Lite model and put a handle bar with grips across the top.

 
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KevinS

Well-Known Member
Location
ontario
Yes, I base it on $/DBH. The more inches I reduce the price to what I consider reasonable and if its just one small tree I have to make it worth the time as well.

I just noticed this post but these soil injectors make fertilizing very simple. Of course making large mulch rings and applying compost annually is the best solution, but convincing customers of this is a different story.

I have the Lite model and put a handle bar with grips across the top.

I’ve seen those on smaller projects not bad. I have a system I’m just trying to workout and justify my $/“ while still hitting a minimum charge.
Phc pricing is not my biggest area of experience so I want to fit in and not devalue the industry and not rip people off
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Location
Columbus
I would estimate gallonage and price from there.

It takes X amount of time to inject X amount of dripline square footage using X amount of product(s)

Chelates being the most expensive vs general fert vs humates etc
 

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