Dutch elm disease?

Neill

Participating member
Location
North carolina
This would be maybe the second time I’ve seen this, so I am not super confident. Looks like a 30ish year old American elm. Started having browning and curling of the leaf margins followed by leaf drop about two months ago. That’s mid spring here in central North Carolina. Now it is putting out new healthy looking leaves. Does anyone agree that is has Dutch elm disease? Other thoughts?
 

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MA Arborist

Participating member
Location
Cape Cod
I don’t think it is DED only because you said it put out out new leaves after dropping leaves. I can’t remember seeing an elm with DED grow new leaves on a limb once they dropped (flagging).
 

oldoakman

Been here a while
Location
Alorgia
Cut a twig and peel back the bark to look for sapwood streaking. Sapwood should be light blonde with no streaks. If it shows streaking have it cultured in the plant disease clinic of your state land gra nb t university. Aslo consider Elm Yellows.
 
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Njdelaney

Branched out member
Location
Detroit
On the subject of Elm Yellows, is it as easy to see on the exterior of American Elm as it is on Siberian Elm? I can't remember seeing it clearly on American Elm.
 

oldoakman

Been here a while
Location
Alorgia
EY kicked in after I moved away from central Pennsylvania but Penn State Main Campus has had an ongoing battle with it that has taken most of the century old elms. I'm not sure how it presents but maybe some of the locals in that area may be able to shed some light...Donny??
 

MA Arborist

Participating member
Location
Cape Cod
I’ve seen leaf drop like that caused by slime flux. One of the big English elms we take care of had it.

Another local “arborist” was convinced that it was dying of DED. (he was wrong).
 

Neill

Participating member
Location
North carolina
Thanks everyone, I am contacting my local plant pathology lab at nc state.
 

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JD3000

Most well-known member
Location
Columbus
A decent test for yellows is to put some twigs in a sealed jar for a bit.
If it smells minty after a while it is likely elm yellows.

Try elm anthracnose for those symptomatic leaves first though.
 

Neill

Participating member
Location
North carolina
Got an update. I sent those same photos to my local lab-figuring to get some answer and possibly move to physical samples next. They looked at them and thought it was Dutch elm disease. I am a lot less sure about that now though. The tree has completely leafed back out with new growth.
I’m thinking elm anthracnose, as suggested by jd. from the reading I did it matches the signs and symptoms to the letter. Also, there was a lot of spot anthracnose on the dogwoods this spring, other evidence that the weather was right for this kind of outbreak. Thanks for the responses
 

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