Does Morbarks paint just suck?

cody willard

Member
Location
Tulsa
Why is it that all the used red Morbark chippers look so crappy after a few years compared to all the other machines? Is it because they seem to be more common up North where they used road salt? Does their paint process just suck?

Brush Bandit uses Imron I know.
 

27RMT0N

Well-Known Member
Location
WA
I read a comment either here or on another forum where the person said red paint just fades faster than other colors. If that's true it seems like a strange choice for Morbark to stick with, because the chippers often look junky and run down a lot sooner than other brands.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
I read a comment either here or on another forum where the person said red paint just fades faster than other colors. If that's true it seems like a strange choice for Morbark to stick with, because the chippers often look junky and run down a lot sooner than other brands.
I was just going to reference that same thread as well. And while I do not have solid proof, I can point out a local drill rig builder who used to build nothing but red rigs, and they all faded quickly as well.
 

Jonny

Well-Known Member
Location
Buffalo
I think a lot of chippers are common farm and implement paint colors. Morbarks look like International Harvester Red. If so, maybe you can touch it up with rattle cans.

My little Bandit is Kubota Orange, but eventually I’m going to track down a decal kit and repaint it John Deere Green.
 

VenasNursery

Well-Known Member
Location
Michigan
My trucks are all red no fading at all

They are parked inside every night though

My 18r paint has went to shit really fast just rusted not faded
It’s also parked inside every night
Salt is really bad here in Michigan but my chipper is in the worst shape of all my equipment (as far as paint goes)

So IMO Morbark paint job is shit
Only bad thing I have to say about them and I would buy another
 

deevo

Well-Known Member
My trucks are all red no fading at all

They are parked inside every night though

My 18r paint has went to shit really fast just rusted not faded
It’s also parked inside every night
Salt is really bad here in Michigan but my chipper is in the worst shape of all my equipment (as far as paint goes)

So IMO Morbark paint job is shit
Only bad thing I have to say about them and I would buy another
Same here I oil spray all my chippers, trucks and trailers and thé brine and salt they put on the roads here will eat anything! Oil spraying helps but only slows the process down.
 

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
Location
Maine Island
It’s tragic. I got an ‘04 dump last spring shipped up from VA with next to no rust spots and it already is showing signs. Just keep washing, spraying, touching up but it’s inevitable.
 
There are two part marine epoxies that are made for salt water environments, including high-zinc red oxide primers, that are used on ice breakers and oil tankers and drilling rigs and barges. They're incredible. Couple of downsides - they are toxic as all getout to mix or apply (way, way more than polyurethanes like Imron, even true two-part with hardener) - picture whole body suit/ positive pressure full facepiece supplied breathing air - and they are a real treat to try and remove from spray equipment, etc. So we're talking roll on, for stuff like chippers anyway. Once dried, well impossible to remove (some I've seen industrially couldn't be sand blasted off without a LOT of work). Overspray - forget it. They can also can be spec'd with more UV stabilizers in them so red and blue (favourites to fade) will last forever even in tropic sun. And now the final drawback - price. Think bigly.
But the technology does exist.
As I've said elsewhere, these days, there's no reason that any chipper less than 10 years old should have been manufactured so it looks like it had lost a tank battle. Time for the manufacturers to up their game with zinc dipping/ galvanizing and ungraded coatings me thinks. Rust never sleeps . . . .
 

Luzl78

Active Member
There are two part marine epoxies that are made for salt water environments, including high-zinc red oxide primers, that are used on ice breakers and oil tankers and drilling rigs and barges. They're incredible. Couple of downsides - they are toxic as all getout to mix or apply (way, way more than polyurethanes like Imron, even true two-part with hardener) - picture whole body suit/ positive pressure full facepiece supplied breathing air - and they are a real treat to try and remove from spray equipment, etc. So we're talking roll on, for stuff like chippers anyway. Once dried, well impossible to remove (some I've seen industrially couldn't be sand blasted off without a LOT of work). Overspray - forget it. They can also can be spec'd with more UV stabilizers in them so red and blue (favourites to fade) will last forever even in tropic sun. And now the final drawback - price. Think bigly.
But the technology does exist.
As I've said elsewhere, these days, there's no reason that any chipper less than 10 years old should have been manufactured so it looks like it had lost a tank battle. Time for the manufacturers to up their game with zinc dipping/ galvanizing and ungraded coatings me thinks. Rust never sleeps . . . .
Show them the money
 

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
Location
Maine Island
There are two part marine epoxies that are made for salt water environments, including high-zinc red oxide primers, that are used on ice breakers and oil tankers and drilling rigs and barges. They're incredible. Couple of downsides - they are toxic as all getout to mix or apply (way, way more than polyurethanes like Imron, even true two-part with hardener) - picture whole body suit/ positive pressure full facepiece supplied breathing air - and they are a real treat to try and remove from spray equipment, etc. So we're talking roll on, for stuff like chippers anyway. Once dried, well impossible to remove (some I've seen industrially couldn't be sand blasted off without a LOT of work). Overspray - forget it. They can also can be spec'd with more UV stabilizers in them so red and blue (favourites to fade) will last forever even in tropic sun. And now the final drawback - price. Think bigly.
But the technology does exist.
As I've said elsewhere, these days, there's no reason that any chipper less than 10 years old should have been manufactured so it looks like it had lost a tank battle. Time for the manufacturers to up their game with zinc dipping/ galvanizing and ungraded coatings me thinks. Rust never sleeps . . . .
Definitely! Stupid thing for any machinery manufacturer to skimp on. Looked at repainting gear with an epoxy like that last summer and got scared off by the hazards, cost was high but prob worth it. Respirators and paint suits are great but not enough for spraying some stuff tucked under a truck or in the back of a chipbox! Had to GoJo pumice my implement painted face a couple days but lungs were ok(?). Didn’t use extra hardener but those are supposed to keep paint from fading as fast.
 

kludge

Active Member
Location
Eastern PA
My understanding is there was a period where the Morbark manufacturing process was not properly removing the preservative oil applied to the steel stock by the manufacturer of the steel stock before painting. It caused a lot of paint failure and rust.

We have a chipper of that era and have repainted only to have it rust back through pretty quickly.

I would be interested to hear if anyone else can confirm that story.
 

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