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macrocarpa

Well-Known Member
Location
Midwest
Anyone watch the documentary on Netflix called "kiss the ground" about regenerative agriculture? When I think of PHC I know this direction is the best longterm solution.

Similarly I've been listening to a lot of Doug Tallamy podcasts. He mostly focusses on transferring the 40+ million acres of turf grass in the US into native plantings and rebuilding topsoil instead of a chem treated deadzone. .

I like to imagine the possibilities of our field expanding more in this direction.....
 
I think there's a lot of work to do . . . . wife's been watching UK gardening shows on Britbox - there's one about doing a backyard renovation in a day and last night's episode, the head renovator guy advised planting a little tree two or three inches down below the level of the grass so that the tree stem would be in a dish and that water would flow down and keep the trunk wet all the time. Picture of tree sittin' in a puddle! So much for ANSI A300 . . .
What I do wish in addition to the above is that with all the tree demolition videos on YouTube (lots of em great) the ISA arborists doing them would talk about planting a tree or two for the ones they dispatch. I just think it'd be a nice change. Blair Glenn talks about this stuff and Craig Bachmann has alluded to his tree restoration efforts and probably others, but most of the other stuff is focussed on gettin' stuff on the ground. Why doesn't ISA get into the tree cloning methods/ standards business like Ancient Tree Alliance? It too seems to be something we've missed along the way. Or maybe just me.
Reg Coates did a video about The Man Who Planted Trees and Big Lonely Doug - good books! Have a look.
 

macrocarpa

Well-Known Member
Location
Midwest
I think there's a lot of work to do . . . . wife's been watching UK gardening shows on Britbox - there's one about doing a backyard renovation in a day and last night's episode, the head renovator guy advised planting a little tree two or three inches down below the level of the grass so that the tree stem would be in a dish and that water would flow down and keep the trunk wet all the time. Picture of tree sittin' in a puddle! So much for ANSI A300 . . .
What I do wish in addition to the above is that with all the tree demolition videos on YouTube (lots of em great) the ISA arborists doing them would talk about planting a tree or two for the ones they dispatch. I just think it'd be a nice change. Blair Glenn talks about this stuff and Craig Bachmann has alluded to his tree restoration efforts and probably others, but most of the other stuff is focussed on gettin' stuff on the ground. Why doesn't ISA get into the tree cloning methods/ standards business like Ancient Tree Alliance? It too seems to be something we've missed along the way. Or maybe just me.
Reg Coates did a video about The Man Who Planted Trees and Big Lonely Doug - good books! Have a look.
Good points!

I understand and enjoy the extreme X-games like removal videos and understand why arbs are drawn to the skill of rigging down "biggest wood". But I think there needs to be a lot more focus on planting and preservation. (is there a planting forum on Treebuzz?) I realized a while back there are plenty of crews able to get trees on the ground no matter where I live. It may not be pretty sometimes and some may leave more ruts and sometimes property damage, but most of the time the end result is the same...a stump. I once heard the Old growth forest network president say "If there is one thing humans have been extremely efficient at over the past 150 years, its cutting trees down".

Nothing more rewarding than driving by a tree I planted 10-20 years ago. Worked on a project planting 97 trees along a leisure trail several years ago and I love walking the path as they caliper up. I also think arborists have a much needed perspective to speak up for preserving wooded areas ahead of development. I think the original landscape design is superior.
 

Timber1972

Active Member
Location
CAN
It sure is odd and disheartening that the definition of an Arborist is the planting care and preservation of trees yet most of what the general public sees is videos about killing trees and then hyped up slamming big wood into the ground (damaging root systems of nearby trees too). Don't get me wrong.. seeing those videos on occasion are good when it focuses on safely doing the job without any damage to homes or if it was a particularly technical job. I would like to see more videos of properly pruned trees and preservation work being done and the extreme skill used to make it happen. Easier said than done and make it easy to follow for the public.
I just gave a webinar talk to over 100 high school students this morning and not 1 knew what an Arborist or Urban Forester was, including the teachers (It was a Forestry Career fair). It is no wonder our profession is seen as nothing but a bunch of backwoods tree hacks hell bent on killing your yard trees.

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macrocarpa

Well-Known Member
Location
Midwest
I wish there were apprenticeships and more promising/stable career paths to encourage the younger generations to enter the field and be encouraged to focus on the type of work we are talking about. I took my proud forestry degree and started with the big green trucks for $10/hour in 2002 haha!

I've seen some good youtube videos from "leaf and limb" on planting etc.
 

Timber1972

Active Member
Location
CAN
Your path sounds similar to mine. I was a Town Forester working for minimum wage before I finished my forestry degree then started at a tree service again for minimum wage ($7/hr) in 1996. Left that to work doing forestry in BC for more than twice the wages. Apprenticeships are there but it is hard to compete with other industries paying big money. Until we get the general public and governments to see Arboriculture as registered (Red Seal) trade we will be stuck I think. I would like to see it as a Registered Profession but baby steps first.

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Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
I wish there were apprenticeships and more promising/stable career paths to encourage the younger generations to enter the field and be encouraged to focus on the type of work we are talking about. I took my proud forestry degree and started with the big green trucks for $10/hour in 2002 haha!

I've seen some good youtube videos from "leaf and limb" on planting etc.
Yes! We as an industry need to start working on bringing some young energy into this industry, show that it really is a good career opportunity and you can go somewhere in trees, or sooner than we think there won’t be anyone at all left to work with the trees we have, if there are any left...
 

macrocarpa

Well-Known Member
Location
Midwest
I see a lot if stuff lately about encouraging younger generations to choose the skilled trades over going to college now that student loans seem to not be paying off in many cases. But is it being honest to tell kids they can make six figures in the skilled trades? Or is it more honest to tell them they’re most likely going to start at $10-15 and work their way up to $20-30 after years of hard work and gaining skills and certs???

 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
I see a lot if stuff lately about encouraging younger generations to choose the skilled trades over going to college now that student loans seem to not be paying off in many cases. But is it being honest to tell kids they can make six figures in the skilled trades? Or is it more honest to tell them they’re most likely going to start at $10-15 and work their way up to $20-30 after years of hard work and gaining skills and certs???

I think it’s possible to make $100k in the trades, but not all that common. I know pipe fitters and millwright as who make that, but most plumbers and mechanics do not.
 
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