Cribbing on a slope

Location
Albany
Generally we work flat ground, but occasionally we have to set up on a slight grade. It’s always tough for me to get my first layer of cribbing level without leaving a big air gap between the cribbing and the ground. I was going to cut some wedges out of some oak 8x8’s I had milled. What’s the best angle to cut on these for slight grades. Or is there a better way?
 

Reach

Been here a while
Location
Atglen, PA
We just stack cribbing and let a gap; place one piece of cribbing across the slope on the “downhill” side and then stack on top of it so the rest of the stack is flat.

This picture isn’t the greatest, but it will give you an idea of one of the ways we do it.
 

Attachments

  • E19C130F-8EAA-4E70-97F6-2E83BD9EEF6F.jpeg
    E19C130F-8EAA-4E70-97F6-2E83BD9EEF6F.jpeg
    2.5 MB · Views: 110

Fivepoints

Branched out member
Also make sure like the picture reach posted, put the downhill piece tall enough that the outrigger pad slopes up on the downhill side. Keeps things from unexpectedly sliding and if it should sink some you are still ok.

I used 5x5 lumber and 2.5x5 to crib with. Its nice because it all stacks together easily. With the 2.5s and the 5s we can setup on a hill very easy without a huge gap. I always like a lot of ground contact spreading the load.
 
Location
Albany
We just stack cribbing and let a gap; place one piece of cribbing across the slope on the “downhill” side and then stack on top of it so the rest of the stack is flat.

This picture isn’t the greatest, but it will give you an idea of one of the ways we do it.
This is basically how we do now. I don’t mind having a small gap with my oak 8x8’s but I normally only carry pine 4x6’s with me and the gap makes me feel uneasy with those. It’s just a 40 ton crane but I’m kind of paranoid on the setup. Nobody ever tipped a crane because their outriggers were too stable.
 

Reach

Been here a while
Location
Atglen, PA
This is basically how we do now. I don’t mind having a small gap with my oak 8x8’s but I normally only carry pine 4x6’s with me and the gap makes me feel uneasy with those. It’s just a 40 ton crane but I’m kind of paranoid on the setup. Nobody ever tipped a crane because their outriggers were too stable.
Change out all your cribbing with Oak 4x6s and you’re good to go, no need for the pine (I don’t trust pine for cribbing ever) and you won’t need to carry two sizes either.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
I had cribbing milled in rectangles...8x10, etc.and 4', 3' and 2' lengths

This gave me a lot of dimensions to choose for the bottom layer when leveling. It also eliminated most 'shims' in 2x dimensions to level up.
 

southsoundtree

Been here a while
Location
Olympia, WA
We just stack cribbing and let a gap; place one piece of cribbing across the slope on the “downhill” side and then stack on top of it so the rest of the stack is flat.

This picture isn’t the greatest, but it will give you an idea of one of the ways we do it.
How much void space between, and bridging across dunnage is legit?
 

Reach

Been here a while
Location
Atglen, PA
How much void space between, and bridging across dunnage is legit?
I don’t have any “official” numbers, just our standard practices. We avoid space between the cribbing sticks, and stack them tight (maybe 1” between them on occasion?) together on the layer that bridges the void below. They never span more than about 3/4 of their length, so probably 24-28” max span?

Also, we are typically stacking on top of this at least one or two more layers to ensure even weight distribution across the whole layer, so that the load is not concentrated in the center of the span, which could cause cribbing breakage.
 
Location
Albany
thanks for all the responses. I think I’ll skip the wedge idea and just get some more oak cribbing milled like reach suggested. I’ll feel more comfortable leaving a gap to get level.
 
Location
Albany
I removed a post oak for a customer this week, and we also took a large eastern white oak off of a house, I saved several logs from both. Which would be a better candidate for cribbing?
 

oceans

Been here a while
Location
RI
I’d go with the alba. It will certainly last longer, if nothing else. That is, h less you can sell it to a wooden boat builder. They’re all going crazy for it around here right now.
 
I've been using white oak boards for a while now. They hold up real well. I have my base layers are 12in wide 4 inch thick and 5 feet long. I also have 12x4x3ft for stacking up and also some 12x3x3ft and 12x2x3ft for spacers and fillers boards. I suggest getting some 1/2 in all thread and drill through side with some bolts and washers helps with splitting.
 

pctree

Branched out member
I carry a mixture of white oak, vast majority are 6x6s we have 2 3x12" x 5'
2 4X8X5' and 6 3x12x3'
Nobody mention sand bags though, we utilize rhem a lot for filling voids
 

Steve Connally

Been here a while
So for my wedges I have 5x7 synthetic structural members. 24" long and maybe 1/2 at the skinny end. I could probably tell you what that angle is but it would probably leave a scar from thinking about it. The simple guy says turn it on its side and cut from one corner opposite to the other end. I like wedges, I prefer not to fill gaps with sand or other movable, shiftable items. Did shoring and cribbing on the fire department for many years. Wasn't ever acceptable for US to operate like that. The verdict is still out on the synthetic stuff though. Used it some in the FD but I haven't decided if crane dunnage is the best application.
 

oceans

Been here a while
Location
RI
I’ve cribbed on several sloped areas, but every time has been on permeable lawn surfaces, or some sort of understory type ground. In these types of areas I’ve always been able to, and feel very comfortable with, digging into the slope and leveling out a pad for my normal cribbing.

In some cases, we’ve lifted up a patch of sod, set up the cribbing, and laid everything back in place when finished with very little to no trace.
 
Location
Albany
I’ve cribbed on several sloped areas, but every time has been on permeable lawn surfaces, or some sort of understory type ground. In these types of areas I’ve always been able to, and feel very comfortable with, digging into the slope and leveling out a pad for my normal cribbing.

In some cases, we’ve lifted up a patch of sod, set up the cribbing, and laid everything back in place when finished with very little to no trace.
We do this when feasible but a lot of times we’re on pavement in the road and I think it would be frowned upon to cut the asphalt haha
 

New threads New posts

Kask Stihl NORTHEASTERN Arborists Wesspur TreeStuff.com Kask Teufelberger Westminster X-Rigging Teufelberger Tracked Lifts Arbor Expo BayLeafDigital
Top Bottom