Compact Bulldog OAR

surveyor

Well-Known Member
If you are wanting midline capability, then the Bone is best. compared to the OAR. However the OAR self tends from the bottom of the spine on a doubled line and works SRT for me, and will do RADS nicely also. The OAR is 12 oz. with arms made of stainless steel and half the spine also, while the friction links are nickel plated steel. The release is unique also in that by pulling down and holding the bottom arm, then the middle arm can be modulated with very little effort to initiate release, while the top arm acts as the brake, just like my first OAR from 2010, but in a much more compact size. It is 3.5 inches from the teardrop hole to the top pivot, The top pivot has a stainless steel bearing, while the teardrop and the bottom of the aluminum spine (7075) have zinc plated brass bearings.
 

surveyor

Well-Known Member
I have been using it on my Sterling Tendril (11.1mm), and Donaghys Cougar (11.7mm), The gap on the OAR arms are 0.46" between the small steel bollard and the friction pin, and 0.56" between the stainless steel arms.
 

surveyor

Well-Known Member
Yes, if the double teardrop is installed on the Bone, and the Bone is at arms length above the bridge, then it will self tend as you pull rope through. You need a large oval biner at the static side of the termination so that it does not interfere with the action of the arms of the Bone.
 

John_KAYS

Well-Known Member
Aren’t we talking applications in Climber Anchored systems (Ddrt) rather than remote anchored (srt)? The benefits really shine in that this OAR version is much more suited for Ddrt. The CBDB is a sweet RAT/SRT device, but lacks a smooth transition into CAT/DdRT. You can use the CBDB with a climber terminated anchor (DdRT) but this OAR looks to be designed with CAT in mind.

(there, were my acronyms confusing enough for everyone). I am finding the CAT and RAT to be really good ways to distinguish these two techniques.
 

John_KAYS

Well-Known Member
...um, One is a feline and the other is a rodent. ;)

Richard Mumford's method of categorizing rope techniques. CAT stands for Climber Anchored Technique. RAT stands for Remote Anchor Technique. In thinking about the techniques in this way it really helps in understanding the mechanical advantage nuances and all that. Actually makes a lot of sense. Here is a thread on it: https://www.treebuzz.com/forum/threads/rat-cat-and-mcat.41135/
 

CanadianStan

Well-Known Member
...um, One is a feline and the other is a rodent. ;)

Richard Mumford's method of categorizing rope techniques. CAT stands for Climber Anchored Technique. RAT stands for Remote Anchor Technique. In thinking about the techniques in this way it really helps in understanding the mechanical advantage nuances and all that. Actually makes a lot of sense. Here is a thread on it: https://www.treebuzz.com/forum/threads/rat-cat-and-mcat.41135/
Oh god.

It makes sense but I'm annoyed that it does
 
Top