Climbing by an historic river

moss

Well-Known Member
Got together with some friends and climbed on a bluff over the Concord River in eastern Massachusetts. We were maybe a mile downstream from the famous "rude wooden bridge" where colonial farmers and local townspeople confronted British troops marching from Boston by way of Lexington. Later in the 19th century Henry Thoreau was all over the same river. He wrote about a canoe trip from Concord to Lowell where the river called Musketaquid by the original inhabitants of the land meets the great Merrimack River coming out of New Hampshire on its way to the Atlantic Ocean. That's a canoe trip I'd like to make, I've found some great trees to climb in that direction, old Black Gum and Swamp White Oak do well along the edges of the river.

We started in an excellent high crowned Northern Red Oak, young photographer Billy made his first high rope and harness climb and was quite at home at 80' or so. The other climber Kris traversed over to a big Eastern White Pine next to the oak. I climbed up into it as well and went to the top for some great views along the way.









All the photos here
-AJ
 
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TREEfool

Active Member
Location
Minnesota
@moss I'm sure I have asked you this question in the past but what do you do in all these trees you climb? I mean, are you a tree researcher of sorts? I feel like every post you make you are in a different state and climbing some new crazy tree and I am just curious to know your climbing story?????
 

moss

Well-Known Member
@moss I'm sure I have asked you this question in the past but what do you do in all these trees you climb? I mean, are you a tree researcher of sorts? I feel like every post you make you are in a different state and climbing some new crazy tree and I am just curious to know your climbing story?????
It’s a long story but the short version is: I love being in the woods and nature and I love climbing trees. Any excuse to be in a tree is good enough. I teach on many of these group rec climbs, I observe nature, I seek great views from the tops of trees, I do research and raptor nest climbs, I rescue stuck cats, I do solo climbs to get body, mind, and spirit in sync, and I do tree work to pay the bills. The climb in a tree in the forest is the core of it. Great question, thanks for asking, it helps me clarify.
-AJ
 
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