Can anyone identify this tree in the woods?

Could anyone provide guidance on identifying a tree from eastern Virginia? We're interested in knowing what type of tree it is and how old the tree might be. The reason we're interested in how old the tree might be is because it grew up through the middle of a heavy rectangular iron structure, and we're trying to determine how long the iron structure might have been there. The tree is in the woods, and difficult to take pictures of. IMG_0320.jpg IMG_0322.jpg IMG_0323.jpg IMG_0314.jpg
 
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Stumpsprouts

Branched out member
Location
Asheville
In your second photo, which of the trees is the one in question? The one just to the left of center, or the tree in center?

I am thinking pitch pine, Pinus rigida. Age estimate would be more accurate if you could take a measurement of its diameter and approximate height. I’m having trouble with sense of scale from the photos.
 
Good question. I should have labeled them.

First picture: The bottom of the tree in question.
Second picture: A view pointed up at the tree in question (at center)
Third picture: A few steps away from the tree in question, with the tree in question at the center (not the tree just left of center, although I think that one is the same type of tree)
Fourth picture: A view of the trees standing outside the woods.
 

evo

Been here a while
Location
My Island, WA
The diameter of the trunk at the bottom is conservatively about 3 feet. It's hard to estimate the height, very tall. In the fourth picture, with the golf cart, it's one of the tallest trees.
Diameter at ground or 4.5 feet above average grade? It kinda matters to us, and we use DCH (aka DBH). Diameter chest height which is 4’ 6” from ground
 

ATH

Been here a while
Location
Ohio
Where are you located? Austria? Your profile just says "Vienna"... that will drastically impact potential answers.
 

ATH

Been here a while
Location
Ohio
How did I skim past that?!

This the tree? (with circled canopy)
pine from buzz.jpg

Unless those pipes are 6-8" diameter, that tree isn't 36" in diameter.

I'm going with Loblolly pine as a first stab. Maybe Shortleaf pine...or Pitch pine. Could be Slash pine. I'm even more confident it is southern yellow pine. how many needles per group?

Rough age? 25-35 years. That can vary by a wide margin depending on growing conditions and history. If it is Loblolly, and if it were much older, it would have shed its lower branches. Maybe I'll switch my best guess to Pitch pine just because they probably shed their branches the least of the SYP if I recall correctly.
 

Stumpsprouts

Branched out member
Location
Asheville
How did I skim past that?!

This the tree? (with circled canopy)
View attachment 77328

Unless those pipes are 6-8" diameter, that tree isn't 36" in diameter.

I'm going with Loblolly pine as a first stab. Maybe Shortleaf pine...or Pitch pine. Could be Slash pine. I'm even more confident it is southern yellow pine. how many needles per group?

Rough age? 25-35 years. That can vary by a wide margin depending on growing conditions and history. If it is Loblolly, and if it were much older, it would have shed its lower branches. Maybe I'll switch my best guess to Pitch pine just because they probably shed their branches the least of the SYP if I recall correctly.
Right. The pipe diameter and the tree diameter don’t match up in my mind.

Zooming in it looks like clusters of 3 which is why I went with rigida.
 

moss

Been here a while
Right. The pipe diameter and the tree diameter don’t match up in my mind.

Zooming in it looks like clusters of 3 which is why I went with rigida.
Thinking the same, pipe diameter says the trunk is quite a bit under 3’ DBH.

It’s impossible to guess a tree’s age by diameter or height. Bark characteristics per species is the best age indicator, without coring a tree or cutting it down.
 
I agree that the tree diameter is way under 3 feet. That was a bad guess. I can’t remeasure until I’m back there again, but I’m including another picture showing the tree growing through the metal structure. The pipe is welded into a rectangle at the base. The pipe is about 4 inches in diameter (measured from the outside). Forgetting the age of the tree, is it possible to confirm that pitch pine is a good guess for the type of tree?

35C34D2E-69F3-464D-8FB6-F9FB606E0ABE.jpeg
 
It’s almost 6 feet tall. There are three of these rectangular structures that have been there for some time. The previous owners (from 100 years ago) ran a logging business and we wonder if they were used for that. They’re incredibly heavy. Attached is a picture of the other two.
 

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ATH

Been here a while
Location
Ohio
Maybe the racks were for stacking pole wood???

I'm not saying it isn't P. rigida, but my argument against it:
King George County looks to be slightly out of the fringe of it's native range and it is less commonly planted than most of the other SYP. Not that it isn't planted...just not anywhere near as frequently as Loblolly, Shortleaf, Slash, or Longleaf (further south...).
 
This part of King George (far eastern part of the county) in the 1800s was called "The Barrens" because of its sandy, acidic soil. When stumpsprouts suggested P. rigida, I looked it up, and P. rigida appears to do well in this type of soil. I don't know much about trees.
 

Stumpsprouts

Branched out member
Location
Asheville
I wouldn’t rule out loblolly, P. taeda. Courtesy of Michael Dirr, description thereof-

“One of the leading commercial timber species in the southeast United States. On cutover areas in the South, the species has spread to a remarkable degree and is aggressive in forming pure stands in old fields. Have seen it growing in the reddest of red clay where few other species proliferate. I have come to appreciate the beauty of this species particularly in my travels throughout the Southeast. It is one ubiquitous pine, colonizing highway cuts, banks, ditches, open grassy fields, and abandoned agricultural land.
Native habitat: Southwestern New Jersey to Florida, Eastern Texas and Oklahoma.”

Oldoakman what made you think loblolly? My yellow pine ID game is infantile and would appreciate a tip.
 
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Reach

Been here a while
Location
Atglen, PA
I wouldn’t rule out loblolly, P. taeda. Courtesy of Michael Dirr, description thereof-

“One of the leading commercial timber species in the southeast United States. On cutover areas in the South, the species has spread to a remarkable degree and is aggressive in forming pure stands in old fields. Have seen it growing in the reddest of red clay where few other species proliferate. I have come to appreciate the beauty of this species particularly in my travels throughout the Southeast. It is one ubiquitous pine, colonizing highway cuts, banks, ditches, open grassy fields, and abandoned agricultural land.
Native habitat: Southwrn New Jersey to Florida, Eastern Texas and Oklahoma.”

Oldoakman what made you think loblolly? My yellow pine ID game is infantile and would appreciate a tip.
Around here I would say Loblolly, as the bark is pretty distinctive, at least in my opinion, and they have a “scruffy” look most of the time. Also, it may be the only yellow pine we have that grows in this area.
 
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