Cambistat/TGR's

treevet

Well-Known Member
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio
Anybody have any documented success with Cambistat? I have a giant tulip next to my house and I love it but it is challenged by soil volume available. It is walled in for root expansion by the house and a drop down to the sidewalk wall and driveway wall.

This Space made it happy when it was smaller...but it has grown to be unhappy. Think I will reduce it a little this winter and try some TGR. Big tree behind my car few years ago. Now it drops earlier than other Tuliptrees and is becoming sparse. Have used other cultural practices.

798294_482953925096020_938138307_o.jpg
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Location
Columbus
Great success with cambist used for alleviating Mn limitations on red maple.

Smaller leave size and the "stacking" effect" takes some getting used to but these products certainly have their place where nutrients or soil volume are limiting. Prob should be used much much more on the utility side of arboriculture too.

Dosage is muy importante.
 

JustinK

Well-Known Member
Location
Sherrills Ford
I've seen side by side comparisons at an undisclosed research facility, of the same age and species trees growing is as similar conditions as can be. Cambistat ones are definitely smaller, more compact, and have harder leaves. I don't know official "results" and haven't seen the same 'single' tree over long enough time, that Ive personally treated, to know how well it worked, but I can say there's a definite difference in the research facility's trees between the treated ones and untreated ones.
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Location
Columbus
Im now recalling a study, that I think was in arboriculture and urban forestry, that showed compartmentalization and/or wound closure was less in PGR treated trees.
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio
Great success with cambist used for alleviating Mn limitations on red maple.

Smaller leave size and the "stacking" effect" takes some getting used to but these products certainly have their place where nutrients or soil volume are limiting. Prob should be used much much more on the utility side of arboriculture too.

Dosage is muy importante.
I have heard that too re dose accuracy.
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Location
Columbus
I'll will try to find the study later today. Pretty sure it was in JoAaUF.

Problem with some studies is that they're usually only performed on select species and usually end with the expression "more study is needed.."

Still better than anecdotal evidence from another source however.
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio
Thanks a lot for the study. I see what they call "yellow poplar" Lirodendron, was not negatively affected by the treatment. That is what I plan to use it on. Boy I used to have "every "Journal of Arboriculture" to the beginning of time...then books just kind of displaced them on my shelves. Great resource.
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Location
Columbus
Hopefully some of our more learned members can chime in here as I really don't have the bio chem/physiology background and I have some questions of my own.
Whats REALLY going on down at the cellular if not molecular level when a PGR like PBZ is being used? I understand that it is a gibberellin(s) inhibitor rather than than older products that either work with or against auxin, but how could it's use potentially affect the CODIT process? Is this perhaps a case of this effect being observed on a few limited tree species?

I've also read that there may also be some potential fungicidal activity as PBZ is listed as a triazole class product. In the past I have noticed that propiconazole and Myclobutanil exhibit some growth regulation via foliar sprays as well. Im gussing that a PBZ app shouldn't occur concurrently on plants such as crabs and hawthorns on a preventative triazole fungicide program?

As far as the product helping with lacking micronutrients, is this result simply because less foliar mass is being produced or is it more complex than that?
 

treevet

Well-Known Member
Location
Cincinnati, Ohio
Kevin Smith probably could come up with more info if there is any. Think we hashed this out years ago but was just looking for a quick response.
 

KTSmith

Well-Known Member
The nuts and bolts of how gibberellins and their antagonists (such as paclobutrazol) work is still not clear. When I was in school, it was all much clearer: auxins stimulated cell elongation and shoot tip growth, gibberellins stimulated stem elongation, cytokinins stimulated root growth and cell division, and whenever any plant part was wounded, ethylene was produced. More or less the same can be said for jasmonic acid and brassicosterol hormones as well. Rarely are any of these are acting alone in the plant. It's the proportion and timing and developmental stage of the plant part that make all the difference! Gibberellin is produced when "dormant" seeds are soaked in water and stimulate amylase production that breaks down starch into sugar. Essential for early stages of seedling development...and still critical for intermodal elongation of shoots. The more you know, the harder it is to figure out!

I could give a rap about any of those in isolated systems, but I don't have much to contribute to this discussion.
I can say that some arborists who I respect use paclobutrazol to slow the extension of shoots...and maybe stimulate root development, but that is less clear. Yes, that can make for an odd appearance aboveground that does require some getting used to.
The Bai and other article (2005) shows some mixed results. Although not relevant, perhaps, to the point at hand, I feel compelled to say that those authors are confusing barrier zone formation with woundwood and wound closure. The BZ is to the side of and above/below the wound, resisting the spread of infection outward towards the vascular cambium. It is not at the interface of the wound surface and the woundwood ribs. Oh well!
Treevet, let us know how it turns out!
 

JD3000

Most well-known member
Location
Columbus
Thanks Kevin, I would like to see more published re root growth and wound reaction. I imagine we will.

Regarding reduction cuts and potential epicormic growth from these areas, I have seen very good results in this area as well as slowing down existing ones. However, their growth is still significantly more than that arising from typical buds.
Does this have something to do with epicormic shoots having different vascular connection and/or different hormonal response?
 

djm

Active Member
Location
Seacoast NH
I have been using tars for several years now- I have seen increased drought resistance, increased suppression of Foliar fungal pathogens, and reduction of shoot elongation. I prescribe based on the desires of the client. It is also one of the most profitable things I sell.
 

DrZtree

New Member
Location
United States
I have been using tars for several years now- I have seen increased drought resistance, increased suppression of Foliar fungal pathogens, and reduction of shoot elongation. I prescribe based on the desires of the client. It is also one of the most profitable things I sell.
 

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