Buckingham Tree Squeeze

I am thinking about getting a few for a few guys to try, It seems like a good product for many applications.
About $200 each, I want to get just a few and have certain guys try it. We have about 22 climbers so that would be expensive unless it is as useful as it seems.
Just wondering if any of you have used it or are using it and your opinions of it.
Thanks, Jeff
 

JCJC7

Member
I have one and I love it, I saw a tree climber using one pruning palms in California he got a few videos on YouTube. I’ve been using mine to do removals, mostly pines and Hickories here in Indiana. I feel safer cause tbh I am not good using spikes.

 

RBJtree

Well-Known Member
It looks like a cool tool. For me it would be superfluous most of the time. I can see how it would be great if your doing mostly conifers, palms or other straight trees and not setting a climbing line from the ground before spiking up.
 

Bucknut

Well-Known Member
How is it different from a traditional AFS? I got a Rope Logic 5/8" AFS from Wesspur for less than half that price ($87.00). Not knocking it, just suggesting you might get similar performance for a bit less $.
 

Jonny

Well-Known Member
Looks pretty easy to just make your own.
Might make a better one since you can use whatever ropes and materials you want to.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Something along these lines....

View attachment 57987
That's an adjustable false crotch...decades old technology and a solid performer. Get rid of the big ring and use a large HMS biner in place. This eliminates disconnecting and rethreading when its time to pass a branch union. Its a great use for pieces of climbing rope that have gotten spiked or cut.
 

Bucknut

Well-Known Member
That's an adjustable false crotch...decades old technology
I agree Tom. But the Treesqueeze doesn’t appear to be much of an advancement:
1FBD1AF4-5E4E-4571-9830-10E5E03F4DB5.jpeg

It’s a doubled rope which is supposed to add strength and cut resistance, but it also adds all those black bands that keep the ropes together. Looks like a real pain to me as it obstructs the adjustable prussic. And the non-working end is not even spliced. Makes it hard just to stow that end out of the way.

To each his own. Probably great for palm and pine while spurring. Mine (AFS) is ok for that but is also primarily used as a tie in point. I don’t think the Buckingham is able to be used as a tie in point. The ropes look stiff and rubberized and won’t have a good bend radius.
 

JCJC7

Member
I agree Tom. But the Treesqueeze doesn’t appear to be much of an advancement:
View attachment 57997

It’s a doubled rope which is supposed to add strength and cut resistance, but it also adds all those black bands that keep the ropes together. Looks like a real pain to me as it obstructs the adjustable prussic. And the non-working end is not even spliced. Makes it hard just to stow that end out of the way.

To each his own. Probably great for palm and pine while spurring. Mine (AFS) is ok for that but is also primarily used as a tie in point. I don’t think the Buckingham is able to be used as a tie in point. The ropes look stiff and rubberized and won’t have a good bend radius.
 

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evo

Well-Known Member
I think its stiffer and a little springy?

It is just a glorified AFS and I wouldnt see the need of going with anything different. There are many ways to make them, and different materials to use. I've made some with 11mm, three strand, 5/8ths, 16 strand, and everything between. For max configurations, do the standard big ring spliced in with an adjustable small ring, but splice in a tightish eye for a steel carabiner. Then you can use one side, or the other for mid line attachablity, or all of them in a small double crotch mode..

Had a kid fresh out of lineman school who wanted to compete at our local logshow. He insisted on using his own gear, which was a waist belt, and some sort of flipline with a buckingham strap. It worked like a friction saver but had floppy dee rings of the same size and steel studded spikes on the inside. it was way too small to fit around our 110' doug fir climbing poles, so I suggested abandoning it and using a more traditional set up. He went up 10', and never saw him again.
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
If you think steel core lanyards are the cats’s ass, you’ll love the tree squeeze. Works as a AFS, but flips like a dream.

Tony
 
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