Bridge rope construction

I’ve always used 16 strand for my bridge. I’ve been told that 24 strand is not recommended and seems to make sense based off its construction. I’m wondering if something like beeline as a bridge is also not recommended. I really just wanted to use it as a secondary lightweight bridge that wouldn’t see too much action, more just to hang things from or the occasional second tie in. Would love to hear what people have used and how it’s help up over time
 

Crimsonking

Carpal tunnel level member
 

Tony

Branched out member
Location
Lancaster, PA
I’ve always used 16 strand for my bridge. I’ve been told that 24 strand is not recommended and seems to make sense based off its construction. I’m wondering if something like beeline as a bridge is also not recommended. I really just wanted to use it as a secondary lightweight bridge that wouldn’t see too much action, more just to hang things from or the occasional second tie in. Would love to hear what people have used and how it’s help up over time
Seth,

A bit of a loaded question. For an accurate answer we would need to know what harness. If fact it gets even easier. If you want a second bridge, just get another of the manufacture’s original.

OEM is always the best decision. It may seem silly, but the manufacturers really do spend a good bit of time and thought selecting and testing the bridge.

The weight savings?? We are talking about a short piece of rope here. I cannot see it being a real factor.

Tony
 
Seth,

A bit of a loaded question. For an accurate answer we would need to know what harness. If fact it gets even easier. If you want a second bridge, just get another of the manufacture’s original.

OEM is always the best decision. It may seem silly, but the manufacturers really do spend a good bit of time and thought selecting and testing the bridge.

The weight savings?? We are talking about a short piece of rope here. I cannot see it being a real factor.

Tony
It’s the monkey beaver, the bridge feeds through two paw shaped rock exotica rigging plates. Comes with Samson arbormaster rbw as the stock bridge. The rigging plates can be oriented to accommodate 2 bridges, which I prefer. My issue is that 2 1/2” ropes in there gets kind of clunky (so it’s not really the weight, I worded it incorrectly). I’m really just looking for a small diameter rope that can be used occasionally as a second bridge if I need it, but most often I use the second bridge to hang big saws or heavy rigging equipment from. Sorry about the lack of information and incorrect wording on the original post
 

CutHighnLetFly

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
Cape Cod, MA
Am I reading this correctly?
If you're just sitting there the second bridge holds the weight well. but in my opinion, it's pretty stupid when you go to do anything but sit there. And if you're just sitting there, why the hell aren't aren't moving or cutting.
 

CutHighnLetFly

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
Cape Cod, MA
@Seth McPherson
Bee line is a terrible rope bridge. The material its core is made of is very different than that of a a traditional double braid arborist rope. It's HMPE (....maybe just butchered the acronym...) material which is much more slippery. So the core of the rope in your knot has a (very extremely small) chance of slipping out of the knot, making g the knot small enough (now being just cover) to slip thru hardware. This is why one sees stitches on the Treemotion rope bridge. Same material, just a different construction for the finished rope bridge product. Globe 3000 for a bridge has a tighter cover than beeline.
Double braid ropes like Samson velocity or Yale 11.7mm ropes, or tachyon, work just fine. As mentioned, manufacturer preference is best in the event you're questioning it, but the Buckingham ergovation was sold with a double braid bridge. Close to 3" tails on the knots that hold it on place (if they're jammed against rigging plates) is recommended.
Things like Tritech (these technora rope covers) eat thru hardware sliding back and forth on it, so also not a great rope bridge choice.
New tribe used Teufelburger Platinum because the core and cover are joined. Kinda neat. Never really cared for it over anything myself.
 
Location
West
I’ve always used 16 strand for my bridge. I’ve been told that 24 strand is not recommended and seems to make sense based off its construction. I’m wondering if something like beeline as a bridge is also not recommended. I really just wanted to use it as a secondary lightweight bridge that wouldn’t see too much action, more just to hang things from or the occasional second tie in. Would love to hear what people have used and how it’s help up over time
I don't worry about it.Using 8 mm rope in loop configurtion.
 
@Seth McPherson
Bee line is a terrible rope bridge. The material its core is made of is very different than that of a a traditional double braid arborist rope. It's HMPE (....maybe just butchered the acronym...) material which is much more slippery. So the core of the rope in your knot has a (very extremely small) chance of slipping out of the knot, making g the knot small enough (now being just cover) to slip thru hardware. This is why one sees stitches on the Treemotion rope bridge. Same material, just a different construction for the finished rope bridge product. Globe 3000 for a bridge has a tighter cover than beeline.
Double braid ropes like Samson velocity or Yale 11.7mm ropes, or tachyon, work just fine. As mentioned, manufacturer preference is best in the event you're questioning it, but the Buckingham ergovation was sold with a double braid bridge. Close to 3" tails on the knots that hold it on place (if they're jammed against rigging plates) is recommended.
Things like Tritech (these technora rope covers) eat thru hardware sliding back and forth on it, so also not a great rope bridge choice.
New tribe used Teufelburger Platinum because the core and cover are joined. Kinda neat. Never really cared for it over anything myself.
Thank you, great information here
 

moss

Been here a while
Platinum has a sensible construction. Outer sheath is slightly interwoven with inner core to mitigate milking.

Platinum line takes away the potential problem of the core slipping through whatever stopper knots are used to anchor each side of the bridge, I believe it is the only advantage.

I think New Tribe started using it when they developed the Onyx harness as a way to avoid the legal/safety issues Teufleberger had around people buying their 10mm Dyneema core bridge by the foot instead of paying for the stock bridge which was stitched through the core on each end to prevent slippage through the anchor knots. Anyone who has spliced Dyneema core cordage knows how slippery it is through the cover.

Polyester cover with a braided Dyneema core makes a very strong and flex fatigue resistant harness bridge allowing for the smaller 10mm diameter cordage (used for the OG Treemorion) as opposed to arborist line polyester double-braids which are 11mm or greater to meet generally accepted work at height strength requirements.

Several full or partial bridge failures happened with climbers using 10mm Beeline, the core material is not flex fatigue resistant and is dangerous for use as bridge cordage.
-AJ
 

Tuebor

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
Here
I know there's been a few Beeline bridges that have failed, but they might have been 8 mm and not 10 mm.
 

moss

Been here a while
Bridges get intense focal point loading so there's not much forgiveness if the fiber is strong but tends to be more brittle out of the box like Vectran. Fine for hitch cord because load is distributed, not constantly on the "edge" of whatever a climber is using for their bridge connecter.

Kevlar is a good example of a "high modulus" fiber that is extremely strong but does not handle focal point flex well. Dyneema (as core, it is sensitive to heat and friction) and polyester fibers handle bridge use very well.
-AJ
 

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