Breakaway lanyards

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
Lanyards keep things from getting away. But sometimes we want them to get away so a fuse is built in.

I think these are the lanyards I use:

PPE work positioning and sometimes short, second rope
Handsaw
SAKA
Neck lanyard to raise the Uni as my chest component
Chainsaw
Knife and scissors
Allen wrench for saddle shackles

Some are homemade others commercially made.

If you choose a break away lanyard where do you put the fuse?

At the tool
At the saddle
 

colb

Been here a while
Location
Florida
Lanyards keep things from getting away. But sometimes we want them to get away so a fuse is built in.

I think these are the lanyards I use:

PPE work positioning and sometimes short, second rope
Handsaw
SAKA
Neck lanyard to raise the Uni as my chest component
Chainsaw
Knife and scissors
Allen wrench for saddle shackles

Some are homemade others commercially made.

If you choose a break away lanyard where do you put the fuse?

At the tool
At the saddle
Weak carabiner on opposite d ring from lanyard adjuster, for convenience. I sometimes kill power, rack, then unclip (all with my right hand so I don't get mixed up. My breakaway biner is on the left d) so that I can depend on the breakaway breaking away only if the piece comes off early. If the piece comes off on time/late my breakaway can be off and I can move on my climbing line if necessary. There are obvious drawbacks to making a quick decision to unclip, but also advantages. I do what I feel is best in each circumstance.

My Echo 2511t has a breakaway wire that clips to my lanyard biner. It's one of those features that makes Echo seem cheap, but actually works really well. Their gas and oil caps with the new sock pack plastic I thingies are the other - they look so weak, have lasted so long, and are so easy to use.

I want a locking dmm xsre for my ms661. At 900 lbs., the breakaway would hurt. I wish it was a 2 or 3 kn biner. The problem is that they break easily under side loading, so a 2-3kn biner might break at more like .5 kn. Might be better if it was more circular to mitigate side loading...
 

Burrapeg

Been here a while
Location
Puget Sound
Rated zip ties have a very predictable breaking point! Generally at the tool
Going up a tree which is clear of stubs or limbs up to a high first limb, and that limb maybe not as big as I would like, I use Richard Mumford's suggestion for newbies (in a video) of keeping two wraps of my lanyard around the tree while going up on the rope. But his, and my, fingers were holding it open to keep it moving up, so that they could get really pinched, possibly permanently damaged or even lost, if we suddenly dropped and closed that loop around the tree. And hanging there, it could be impossible to free either hand if our full weight was hanging on that lanyard pinching them. A person would be f*ked, basically, not much chance of self rescue. Using zip ties keeps the lanyard open, are quick to apply and cut away later, and break instantly if I drop. And no fingers inside the loop if it happens. I consider zip ties one of our great modern inventions, like velcro, the internet, and air conditioning.
 

theatertech87

Branched out member
Location
Rochester
Rated zip ties have a very predictable breaking point! Generally at the tool
This. Between soft and hard links (i.e. between the lanyard and the snap at the end) so if it breaks away any heavy metal bits stay captured on your harness and just the rope good flying through the air.

Also in the event it does break away, a spliced eye is way less likely to catch on something than a carabiner or snap
 

southsoundtree

Been here a while
Location
Olympia, WA
How strong is it?

I'm going to put some zip ties on my gear loops to attach rigging lines, which are, IMO, more likely to get chipped. A climb line can be bagged on a harness, or kept out of the work area, more easily.
 

Cereal_Killer

Branched out member
Location
Ohio
It's stamped "SWL 225" whatever that means. We pulled on one with a 5:1 expecting it to take a bunch of weight but it probably didn't take 50lbs of input pull to break it and honestly for that purpose that's still more than I'd like.
 

Reach

Been here a while
Location
Atglen, PA
It's stamped "SWL 225" whatever that means. We pulled on one with a 5:1 expecting it to take a bunch of weight but it probably didn't take 50lbs of input pull to break it and honestly for that purpose that's still more than I'd like.
“SWL” means Safe Working Load, so theoretically it’s rated to a working load of up to 225 lbs.
 

Cereal_Killer

Branched out member
Location
Ohio
Yeah I got what it stood for, just suggesting that anything a keychain / toy says should be suspect...
I was putting under 50lbs on the pull rope, considering losses no way the keychain carabiner was even seeing 225lbs and it severely deformed.
Thats what I meant when I said "whatever that means".

I was willing to use it in that application cause I knew it'd either straighten or break completely by ~250,
 

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