Bloodstopper pouch

SeanRuel

Branched out member
Location
Portland
I'm thinking to get a bloodstop pouch to fit in that neat little holder on my treemotion. Had a Wesspur order built, but called to ask about their "bloodstopper pouch". Apparently it just contains a normal compression bandage.

Does anyone know who sells a hemostatic gauze kit that fits on a treemotion? I'd really like the clotting stuff if I ever actually need to use it.

To any medically informed folks- is there any reason people shouldn't use bloodstopper powder/ gauze? Is there a reason the wesspur kit doesn't use hemostatic bandages?
 

Jonny

Been here a while
Location
Buffalo
Check out Walgreens or CVS or other big drugstores.

I keep a CAT tourniquet on my saddles. I should add a pressure dressing and maybe celox or other clotting agent.
 

Chris Schultz

Participating member
Location
Minturn
I'm thinking to get a bloodstop pouch to fit in that neat little holder on my treemotion. Had a Wesspur order built, but called to ask about their "bloodstopper pouch". Apparently it just contains a normal compression bandage.

Does anyone know who sells a hemostatic gauze kit that fits on a treemotion? I'd really like the clotting stuff if I ever actually need to use it.

To any medically informed folks- is there any reason people shouldn't use bloodstopper powder/ gauze? Is there a reason the wesspur kit doesn't use hemostatic bandages?
I’ve had to use the powder on myself. The ambulance staff, and ER doc didn’t seem the have anything bad to say about it. It did it’s job as intended. Just took a LOT of scrubbing/irrigation to get that shit out before they could put me back together again. If you find a good/functional pouch, let me know. My pouch sucks.
 

Tony

Branched out member
Location
Lancaster, PA
Some of the blood stopper powders contain high amounts of iodine. This could be an issue if you have a shellfish allergy.

The packets of powder work well, but must be applied accurately. This may be tough if you are the victim and first aid attendant. I would stcik with the bandages and gauze that have it included.

I prefer the Israeli Combat bandages. Many manufactures making them theses days. Order an extra for training. Using it for the first time when you are leaking is a bad idea.

As for a durable pouch, find a sturdy hand cuff pouch from a law enforcement equipment supplier.

Tony
 

Brocky

Been here a while
Location
Michigan
Pretend you have a deep cut on your hand, or wrist that you have to apply pressure to with the other hand. Now reach around behind you to get that little pouch while still applying pressure.
 
Years ago we had ACC belay practice sessions (for alpine) and one of the "activities" was to try and rap down - using one hand only! - it was a real crap fest (belayed from the top of course) to try and get yourself down, but you really got to know another dimension of your rapelling rig/ setup. A similar scenario was explored in a video by Terry Hale - Emergency Descent Practice.
Brocky's point is well, to the point - try and get to your bandage/ tourniquet simulating one hand really injured (at ACC we "had" one hand smashed with a rock or piece of ice). Can you reach the bandage (wherever it may be) with the bad hand while still keeping pressure on the with the good hand? Practice unclipping your lanyard so you can rap down. Low and slow. It can be amazing what you can find out about our "standard setups" that seem sooo easy with both hands. Case in point, for a while I tried a small leather pouch on my thigh to hold a bandage but what I found is that I couldn't work the fancy buckle-turn-push-Euro thingy (I had bought it in a Spanish leather shop on holiday) with only one hand. Went back to good old velcro - easier to use for low IQ like me!
 

Chris Schultz

Participating member
Location
Minturn
Years ago we had ACC belay practice sessions (for alpine) and one of the "activities" was to try and rap down - using one hand only! - it was a real crap fest (belayed from the top of course) to try and get yourself down, but you really got to know another dimension of your rapelling rig/ setup. A similar scenario was explored in a video by Terry Hale - Emergency Descent Practice.
Brocky's point is well, to the point - try and get to your bandage/ tourniquet simulating one hand really injured (at ACC we "had" one hand smashed with a rock or piece of ice). Can you reach the bandage (wherever it may be) with the bad hand while still keeping pressure on the with the good hand? Practice unclipping your lanyard so you can rap down. Low and slow. It can be amazing what you can find out about our "standard setups" that seem sooo easy with both hands. Case in point, for a while I tried a small leather pouch on my thigh to hold a bandage but what I found is that I couldn't work the fancy buckle-turn-push-Euro thingy (I had bought it in a Spanish leather shop on holiday) with only one hand. Went back to good old velcro - easier to use for low IQ like me!
When my silky attacked me, I set my figure 8 one handed and bombed out, my proximity to the ground I felt that was fastest. Crew had celox/gauze waiting for my arrival…
 

Steve Connally

Been here a while
I would go with pressure and tourniquet. Im not a fan of putting a substance in a wound that's already dirty from whatever cut it. Number one issues with a wound secondary to bleeding to death is a systemic infection. Direct pressure has been the gold standard for the 30 years i've been a paramedic. The tourniquet deal went from use to don't use back to use in my career. It'll likely change again. Sterile gauze is best. Regular gauze will leave fibers and can also cause infection but as you're bleeding out a dirty t-shirt will do the job. Just makes for a nasty cleaning of the wound. I have several different dressings and devices. None of the cause clotting by any other means than the body's own ability to form clots.
 
To give you some insight, the military stepped away from using the powders and instead went with gauze infused with the clotting agent, because its more effective, and easier to irrigate(clean) out of a wound channel than the powder. The powder is still very effectice when used properly but just needs extra attention later on.

As for an IFAK (Individual First Aid Kit) to put on your saddle you really only need about 3 things in it.

Tourniquet
Pressure Dressing (Israeli Bandage)
Gauze (wound packing)

You can also carry medical shears if you want but its not as critical.

I dont have a treemotion so idk what kind of pouch it has, or what mounting options you have, but on my Weaver Denali i was able to mount a MOLLE pouch that works pretty well. Im tryin to attach pictures but i keep getting an error
 

SeanRuel

Branched out member
Location
Portland
Thanks. I think my wilderness first aid class 10 years ago scared me off tourniquets. They're back in now it sounds like, pretty much a no brainer.
 

Steve Connally

Been here a while
How did they scare you off of tourniquets? To my knowledge theyve always been "in".
The application has changed over the years. Initially they were only used as a last resort because you would stop arterial blood flow most often resulting in the needed amputation of the limb. Now you use them to the point of slowing arterial slow only to the point where the arterial flow is slowed enough to allow clotting. Using a BP cuff inflated to the diastolic pressure is the most effective measure. So they are recommended to slow blood flow, not completely stop it. Back I the day you'd write a "T" and the time applied to the pt's forehead so the surgical team knew if the limb or appendage was able to be salvaged or if it just needed to be removed. Much similar as to why MAST trousers became obsolete. They would cause a mechanical compartment syndrome and most individuals would not survive taking off the pants. Classic example of when Vietnam era emergency treatment was fully understood and evaluated for effectiveness.
 
The application has changed over the years. Initially they were only used as a last resort because you would stop arterial blood flow most often resulting in the needed amputation of the limb. Now you use them to the point of slowing arterial slow only to the point where the arterial flow is slowed enough to allow clotting. Using a BP cuff inflated to the diastolic pressure is the most effective measure. So they are recommended to slow blood flow, not completely stop it. Back I the day you'd write a "T" and the time applied to the pt's forehead so the surgical team knew if the limb or appendage was able to be salvaged or if it just needed to be removed.
Sounds like you know more than me but i can telll you at least a few years ago in the military we were still taught to fully enage a tourniquet and write on the tourniquet itself the time applied, most tourniquets i see for sale have a tag to write the time on. If i remember correctly theres a method where you would release the tourniquet every 20 minutes to restore bloodflow to prevent loss of limb. But i also havent had a CLS course in a loong time so best practices have most likely changed

Regardless in that oh shit moment where life and death is 30 seconds away ill take a tourniquet high and tight every time
 

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