Bittersweet control under trees

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
Location
Maine Island
Looking to chemically treat larger diameter, heavily established, vines. One spot is adjacent to a wetland so Vastlan is a rated option. Thinking cut-stump but don’t want to damage a mature maple where the vines originate.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
Tordon RTU can be used for cut stump treatments if used very carefully. Tordon has very high soil motility, but I don’t recall it moving very effectively from one plant into another. Also, look at Crossbow. We used to use it with regularity and great effectivity. I can’t promise how well it works on bittersweet, but I believe that it will, it certainly killed off everything we ever wanted it to.
 

dsptech

Well-Known Member
Location
North East
Tordon RTU can be used for cut stump treatments if used very carefully. Tordon has very high soil motility, but I don’t recall it moving very effectively from one plant into another. Also, look at Crossbow. We used to use it with regularity and great effectivity. I can’t promise how well it works on bittersweet, but I believe that it will, it certainly killed off everything we ever wanted it to.
What's your experience on using crossbow on Sumac and wild grape vine?
I was looking to buy some Garlon but could only find it in 2.5 gallons.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
What's your experience on using crossbow on Sumac and wild grape vine?
I was looking to buy some Garlon but could only find it in 2.5 gallons.
We don’t have Sumac here, amazingly enough, but it will take down grapevine without too much trouble if you get adequate coverage. We typically have used foliar applications of Crossbow, mixed with RoundUp Powermax when we needed to kill everything in town. We used to do some utility spraying, and that was our go-to for a quick kill of everything, especially if replanting was planned for the near future.
 

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
Location
Maine Island
Looks like those would be candidates for drier spots farther away from wetlands reading the labels. There is so much bittersweet, multiflora rose, and Japanese barberry here. Tordon is a new one to me, not my wheelhouse, I’ll read more into it thx.
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
Location
Ohio
Garlon 3 is labeled for wetland use... Very effective on cut stumps and won't move in the soil like Tordon. RoundUp Custom is also labeled for wetlands. Not sure if it has cut stump treatment on the label or not...
 

Serf Life

Well-Known Member
Location
Maine Island
Garlon 3 is labeled for wetland use... Very effective on cut stumps and won't move in the soil like Tordon. RoundUp Custom is also labeled for wetlands. Not sure if it has cut stump treatment on the label or not...
Double checking, is Vastlan different than garlon 3? So many different names and formulations pop up in searches, just want to be versed before heading to the distributor.

Think you nailed it with Roundup Custom. Sounds like a perfect candidate for that specific plant and site.

B34944D3-3DEA-4F0E-B99F-C35674598DB6.png
 
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Nish

Well-Known Member
Location
North Carolina
I've found this USDA guide to be an excellent resource for controlling invasive vegetation: https://www.srs.fs.fed.us/pubs/gtr/gtr_srs131.pdf

Here's what Miller et al. recommend for oriental bittersweet:
Screen Shot 2020-07-11 at 10.42.08 PM.png
No need to get the name brand herbicides. Plenty of generic equivalents here. For example, here's one gallon of the equivalent of RoundUp Custom. As cut and treat that would be the safest (it's labeled for cut and stump application at full concentration). Triclopyr 4 (same as Garlon 4) with a basal oil carrier would be good as a basal bark spray in winter, as long as you don't have run off or overspray onto non-target trees/shrubs. In warm weather it will vaporize and will affect adjacent vegetation. I'd stay away from both Arsenal (imazapyr) and Tordon (picloram) if you're concerned about collateral damage to adjacent trees.

Good luck! Keep us posted if you learn anything from your work on this.
 
Last edited:

ATH

Well-Known Member
Location
Ohio
....
No need to get the name brand herbicides. Plenty of generic equivalents here. For example, here's one gallon of the equivalent of RoundUp Custom. As cut and treat that would be the safest (it's labeled for cut and stump application at full concentration). Triclopyr 4 (same as Garlon 4) with a basal oil carrier would be good as a basal bark spray in winter, as long as you don't have run off or overspray onto non-target trees/shrubs. In warm weather it will vaporize and will affect adjacent vegetation. I'd stay away from both Arsenal (with imazapyr) and Tordon (with picloram) if you're concerned about collateral damage to adjacent trees.

Good luck! Keep us posted if you learn anything from your work on this.
Agree often generics are the better choice, but not always. I just use name brands out of habit...kinda like if I say I'm going to take Advil, it is probably not "Advil". I've found Garlon 3A about the same price as generics. Actually one time I ordered generic and they sent Garlon. Locally, I paid $50 for 2.5 gallon jugs of RoundUp Custom last couple of times I bought that,

Garlon 4 is NOT labeled for wetland use. Here is the only exception:
It is permissible to treat non-irrigation ditch banks, seasonally dry
wetlands (such as flood plains, deltas, marshes, swamps, or bogs) and
transitional areas between upland and lowland sites where surface
water is not present except in isolated pockets due to uneven or unlevel
conditions. Do not apply to open water (such as lakes, reservoirs, rivers,
streams, creeks, salt water bays, or estuaries).
 

ATH

Well-Known Member
Location
Ohio
Double checking, is Vastlan different than garlon 3? So many different names and formulations pop up in searches, just want to be versed before heading to the distributor.

........
Had to look that one up. I guess I vaguely recall somebody mentioning it a couple of years ago:
What makes Vastlan different from Garlon 3A?
• No difference in efficacy; Vastlan provides the same
level of weed and brush control you expect from
Garlon 3A. Several years of testing has demonstrated
bioequivalency between the two products.
• An improved signal word. Vastlan label carries a
“Warning” signal word compared to a “Danger”
signal word commonly displayed by triethylamine
formulations of triclopyr.
• Vastlan contains 4 pounds of acid equivalent of
triclopyr per gallon vs. 3 pounds of acid equivalent
per gallon in Garlon 3A. This means that vegetation
managers can handle 25% less material to achieve
equivalent control of weeds and brush.
• Just like Garlon 3A, Vastlan will be labeled for
numerous rights-of-way applications including aquatic
areas. It will also carry a range & pasture label which
allows for treatment of areas to be hayed or grazed.




Sounds like what I'll buy next time.
 

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