Bigshot Sight/Finder

Dan Cobb

Branched out member
Location
Hoover
Saw a mention of using a red dot finder on a Bigshot in another thread. I bought a Bigshot several months ago, but it's never occurred to me to put some sort of sight on it. I think my accuracy is good just sighting along the pole. Do many folks here use some type of aiming aid? And how helpful is it?

Seems like with the all the variables involved (launch angle, length of pull, throw bag weight, temperature, interfering branches, etc.), absolute pointing accuracy is only one piece of the puzzle.
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
I've always thought of the Big Shot being pointed like a shot gun not aimed as a rifle.

After shooting I might keep the BS on my shoulder and watch the arc of the throwline. It takes on the look of tracers. This allows me to understand how to aim better if I have more horizontal or more vertical shot.
 

misfit

Participating member
Location
Baton Rouge
Many years ago, there was a clip-on holder for a laser pointer available. It's just a plastic clip that clips on the Big Shot pole, and it has another clip to hold a laser pointer in line with the pole. I remember laughing about how useless that was, but it was so cheap, I bought one just to have it. I still have it, but I have never tried to use it. The best it can do is show you where the pole is pointing, but not where the elastic bands are pointing, and since you typically aim it toward empty space above your target limb, there is nothing there to show where the laser is pointing anyway. Of course, a red dot sight would fix that problem, but it's still not going to make the Big Shot a precision tool.
 

27RMT0N

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
WA
I've been thinking of buying a telescope for a while but since the pandemic, they have all been sold out! So I'm still pretty new/ignorant but that's what, a homemade 12" dob?

As for the bigshot, I've never used any kind of sight on mine, just roll by instinct. That said, setting lines is still my greatest frustration in tree-work. I bought a trigger but never use it....
 

Dan Cobb

Branched out member
Location
Hoover
I've been thinking of buying a telescope for a while but since the pandemic, they have all been sold out! So I'm still pretty new/ignorant but that's what, a homemade 12" dob?
17.5" dob. Don't recall the brand off the top of my head. I bought it used. Came with the homemade dolly, so I can roll it out of the garage into the driveway easily. Unfortunately, I have a very limited view of the sky from my driveway. The amount of use my telescopes get seems to be proportional to how much effort it takes to set them up. TV-85 on a Telepod gets the most use.
 

Bart_

Participating member
Location
GTA
I find cross wind, size of the throw weight and 1.7 or 2.2 line and whether you're trying to just get over a union without excessive shoot-past into scruff, or doing a hard shot that flies straighter, or what your angle of line of sight/flight is mess with things so much that an accurate sight or dot might only be an aid vs a sure thing. I even find that how rigidly I hold the poles significantly affects the shot.

Do I sound pessimistic?

Luck of the draw. Good day bad day, 1st shot or 10 tries I can't always find rhyme and reason to it.

That said, if a laser dot could prevent field goal post shots it'd be worth it.
 

27RMT0N

Carpal tunnel level member
Location
WA
17.5" dob. Don't recall the brand off the top of my head. I bought it used. Came with the homemade dolly, so I can roll it out of the garage into the driveway easily. Unfortunately, I have a very limited view of the sky from my driveway. The amount of use my telescopes get seems to be proportional to how much effort it takes to set them up. TV-85 on a Telepod gets the most use.

Yah, now that I look a little closer at the scale I realize how big it is! Most people are happy to have like an 8", 17.5 is huge!
 

Tom Dunlap

Here from the beginning
Administrator
When I was pre-teen Dad would take us kids to the gravel pit for shooting lessons. To teach us trajectories he made up targets in a grid. We'd setup and aim for the center crosses then shoot 6 shots or so....22 cal shorts. then he would move us back and we'd repeat. After a while we could see the trajectory pattern. A few years later when it was time to shoo the 30-06 he did the same. He did some chart reading and sighted in the rifles to match the shots we'd expect in the area where we hunted. Since we had an idea of the trajectory we had a bit of an idea how to raise or lower the sights at different distances.

I took the same concept along when I started shooting the BS with a Wichard snap from my shoulder. In my minds eye I projected the grid onto the end of the BS horns and aimed for my target. By keeping the BS in place as the throwball/line went towards my target I could see the trajectory. By changing the pull-down for the trigger I was changing the arc of the trajectory. It was very visible once I stayed in place.

After a while I had my windage down! I could make changes to my shot by moving towards or away from the target as well as the pulldown. My BS accuracy got pretty good!
 

DSMc

Been here a while
Location
Montana
A laser works great on an APTA. You simply line it up with the bore so you know exactly where it is pointing without the need to look down the barrel. Holdover for angles and distance quickly become second-nature.
 

Bart_

Participating member
Location
GTA
How's Apta like device's control over force of the shot i.e. so you can just lob over a crotch if needed? How many change in psi means roughly how much change in vertical reach of the shot, say extra 5 psi gives another 10 feet? Curious.
 

DSMc

Been here a while
Location
Montana
With my APTA, I get approximately one foot of altitude per pound of tube pressure. Even though a calculated and gentle lob over a crotch is quite doable, I will rarely do so. Having a bit more air than needed, will create a more consistent shot and the small amount of excess power dissipates quickly enough to control the throw line with a gloved hand.
 

Winchman

Branched out member
I rest my BS on the ground and kneel behind it, so aiming is pretty much wishful thinking. However, with a lot of practice I've gotten surprisingly good at hitting my targets. Rarely does it take more than two shots to get where I want, and on most of those times it's interference from branches closer to me or bouncing off the target branch than ruins the shot.

The panic snap release I use for a trigger let's me pull straight back to fire, so that helps with accuracy.
 

climbingmonkey24

Branched out member
Location
United States
Never tried some type of aiming device, but I wonder how a golf scope or rifle scope may work? I actually have a golf scope that coincidentally I don’t think I’ve ever actually tried on the golf course lol.
 

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