Best Ladder for Tree Work?

Dan Cobb

Well-Known Member
Location
Hoover
What's the best ladder for tree work?

And another question: should I (a) put the ladder on the ground and dive from the tree onto the ladder or (b) pull the ladder into the tree, tie it to me with a short piece of rope, and then jump to the ground so the ladder hits me just after impact? The information on YouTube is so confusing.
 

Bendroctanus

Well-Known Member
Location
Springfield
What's the best ladder for tree work?

And another question: should I (a) put the ladder on the ground and dive from the tree onto the ladder or (b) pull the ladder into the tree, tie it to me with a short piece of rope, and then jump to the ground so the ladder hits me just after impact? The information on YouTube is so confusing.
Best I saw was a guy with a corded saw, had an extension ladder fully extended on a Ponderosa Pine (probably 75+ feet) and kept attaching extension ladders by rope to the tree as he limbed it up. Like 5 of them. Wish I would have taken a picture. Took weeks for him to get up top. I only saw the progress every day as I was driving back to the yard. I think in the end he just left a huge stubbied spar.
 

Reach

Well-Known Member
Location
Atglen, PA
The best ladder is the one behind your neighbor’s shed. They’ll never know you borrowed it, and they’ll be clueless when it’s broken.

Correct answer is “a” because it’s easy to jump from a limb back down to the ladder, “b” is a bad idea because you might break the ladder before you’re finished with it, and the neighbor might hear the commotion and discover that you borrowed the ladder before you can return it.
 

climbingmonkey24

Well-Known Member
Location
United States
What's the best ladder for tree work?

And another question: should I (a) put the ladder on the ground and dive from the tree onto the ladder or (b) pull the ladder into the tree, tie it to me with a short piece of rope, and then jump to the ground so the ladder hits me just after impact? The information on YouTube is so confusing.

cd0d7619041d1f141d3e6fea29bb2724.jpg
 

climbingmonkey24

Well-Known Member
Location
United States
I’m going to bring a little seriousness to this thread and say three words:

Little Giant Ladder.

That’s what we use for the occasional ladder usage for whatever we need it for (getting over fences, getting on roof, pruning real small trees or shrubs, etc.). Doesn’t take up much space.
 

27RMT0N

Well-Known Member
Location
WA
To follow up with another serious suggestion: 10-12' orchard ladder is great for pruning smaller trees and everyone should have one on their truck. It's really the only type of ladder made for and stable on uneven outdoor surfaces, or turn it backwards and lean it against a gutter to get onto a first floor roof.

heavy-duty-braces-on-bottom-step-for-added-strength.jpg
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Location
Florida
Tripod orchard ladders are great for ornamental tree work. Hasagawa, Henchman, and Niwaki sell good ones.

The double slide thingies are great for accessing trees for some guys, and they are roped in of course. I prefer just climbing the rope SRT with foot and knee ascenders because ladders are a pain to unload and load.
 

oldoakman

Well-Known Member
Location
Alorgia
To follow up with another serious suggestion: 10-12' orchard ladder is great for pruning smaller trees and everyone should have one on their truck. It's really the only type of ladder made for and stable on uneven outdoor surfaces, or turn it backwards and lean it against a gutter to get onto a first floor roof.

View attachment 75935
My son in law loves his orchard ladder but it still almost took off one of his fingers when it collapsed under him one time. Thus I stand by my previous statement.
 

Crimsonking

Well-Known Member
When I worked in construction I was super comfortable with ladders and even balanced them until i reached the top, then let them rest against the wall. Or hang from trusses and use my legs to swing a ladder to the next needed location.

Now I can’t stand them and want to be tied in.
 

oldoakman

Well-Known Member
Location
Alorgia
When I worked in construction I was super comfortable with ladders and even balanced them until i reached the top, then let them rest against the wall. Or hang from trusses and use my legs to swing a ladder to the next needed location.

Now I can’t stand them and want to be tied in.
Construction workers do a lot of foolish things. Working on roofs without tying in is one of them.
 

Jonny

Well-Known Member
Location
Buffalo
Handy for blowing sawdust off roofs if I really leave a mess. Sometimes I like dropping phone and CATV wires rather than work around them. Otherwise I avoid ladders. Secure it to the roof of the chip truck and you’ll forget it’s there until you need it.
 

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