BE CAREFUL WHEN WORKING NEAR POWER LINES

Vl2007

Member
Hey, I don't need to see crap like that. Give me a warning next time. I know some people get off watching death, NOT ME! Sorry to be an arss.
 

Blinky

New Member
That one's been around, it's pretty graphic... but every arborist should see this stuff. High voltage lines allow ZERO mistakes, no second chances.

It's no fun watching that, a gore warning is appropriate... but if you are an arborist working near primaries, definitely watch it. Just a brief touch like that with a good ground and it's over, you become a hunk of smoking carbon.
 

Vl2007

Member
I did eight years at florida power and light. They educated me in the dangers of power lines, and I have great respect for power lines, but not once did i see any one die in a video to teach me that. jm2c
 

Blinky

New Member
Good for you, you've had an education about power lines. Most of us are not so lucky. Most of us are not certified LCAs and haven't had that benefit.

There are a lot of arborists who were never even shown the difference between service and primaries. After they get away with touching drops they may take it that all power lines can be approached or even touched. Without the education, how do they know?

I think you deserved a warning because you shouldn't be led to accidentally watch something you don't want to watch... but lets be clear, this isn't about getting off on death, it's about making arborists safer. It doesn't hurt to watch a video, even if you're really sensitive, it's perfectly safe.

That video graphically and unmistakably says everything you ever need to know about HV lines. They will definitely kill you if you touch them just once. It's a quick but rather uncomfortable education.

Stay safe.
 

TC

Well-Known Member
That was a person being killed by a violent and powerful electric shock. He made a mistake, he was distracted, he doesnt deserved to be ridiculed or made fun of. I feel ill.
 

Blinky

New Member
I don't see anyone ridiculing or making fun of the victim. A smoking hunk of carbon is what you become if you touch HV. I don't want to be a smoking hunk of carbon. Nobody here is getting gratification from that video, it's alarming and it illustrates a sudden, violent, regrettable death... it's not remotely funny or entertaining.

Sometimes I wish I was so sensitive that things like that repulsed me but they don't. I know some people, big strong people, who faint or feel ill at the sight of blood or death... I'm not one, so I can't relate when you say you're offended or feel sick. I respect that, but I can't empathize with you on it. Maybe I've seen too much in person to have a video affect me like that.

I think the video is a perfect illustration of the danger of high voltage, the point being that one little touch and you're finished, your loved ones will never see you again and you will never again see them. That's worth some serious thought next time you do a job around primaries, even the little 7200V ones that look like clothesline.

I've seen people bang into service drops with pole saw blades, stand on them, drop 6" limbs on them. Do that around a primary or distribution even once and the outcome will be very, very different. That's well worth knowing in no uncertain terms.

If you can learn that by watching it sitting comfortably indoors in perfect safety, well... that's a pretty safe way to learn about such severe consequences.

A friend of mine put it this way, it's pretty hard to un-electrocute yourself. If that's all you have to hear to have a grip on the 100% lethality of HV then good on you, don't watch the video.

Maybe this discussion will be enough for most of the uninitiated and they can forgo watching something so disturbing.
 

treebing

Well-Known Member
I'll forgo it, just thinking about watching it is making mee feel queazy. I lost a friend here in detroit after he dropped a mulberry top on to some wires. His ground guy had to watch it live.
 

JesseHuffman

Active Member
[ QUOTE ]
I don't see anyone ridiculing or making fun of the victim. A smoking hunk of carbon is what you become if you touch HV. I don't want to be a smoking hunk of carbon. Nobody here is getting gratification from that video, it's alarming and it illustrates a sudden, violent, regrettable death... it's not remotely funny or entertaining.

Sometimes I wish I was so sensitive that things like that repulsed me but they don't. I know some people, big strong people, who faint or feel ill at the sight of blood or death... I'm not one, so I can't relate when you say you're offended or feel sick. I respect that, but I can't empathize with you on it. Maybe I've seen too much in person to have a video affect me like that.

I think the video is a perfect illustration of the danger of high voltage, the point being that one little touch and you're finished, your loved ones will never see you again and you will never again see them. That's worth some serious thought next time you do a job around primaries, even the little 7200V ones that look like clothesline.

I've seen people bang into service drops with pole saw blades, stand on them, drop 6" limbs on them. Do that around a primary or distribution even once and the outcome will be very, very different. That's well worth knowing in no uncertain terms.

If you can learn that by watching it sitting comfortably indoors in perfect safety, well... that's a pretty safe way to learn about such severe consequences.

A friend of mine put it this way, it's pretty hard to un-electrocute yourself. If that's all you have to hear to have a grip on the 100% lethality of HV then good on you, don't watch the video.

Maybe this discussion will be enough for most of the uninitiated and they can forgo watching something so disturbing.

[/ QUOTE ]


I couldn't agree more. That video validates every fear I ever had about primaries. The hot dog cooking demo I have seen utilities companies perform pale in comparison to that.
Horrible enough to watch twice. My vigilance is stronger than ever after seeing that.

R I P train dude
 

CHOPPER

Active Member
It is a very nasty clip but it is a REAL lesson of the power of electricity.
It is very important especially for not long in the tooth climbers to know their limitations in regard to powerlines.
That was high voltage.Don't think that only high voltage are dangerous.
Statistically low voltage is a bigger killer,even the little insulated service wires to your house are killers.
A very bad clip, but a learning aid, albeit very graphic.
If you don't understand how dangerous electricity is,you should watch.
 

Daniel

Well-Known Member
I had two scotch pines to drop, right back up against the primaries today. Pretty good DZ away from the street. I don't get near wires much. On the first, I had to cut some lower limbs growing back through the communication lines before dropping the tree. I never was at or above the primaries or secondaries.

On the second, I was origianlly planning on dropping the tree from the ground, but there were some limbs that might have hung up on an adjacent maple and casused the tree to twist and spin during the fall which was not acceptable. So I went up to take the interfering limbs out. I set a throwline on the side away from the wires and footlocked up away from the trunk and wires rather than wearing spikes. Was able to VERY CAREFULLY lower all the limbs that could have hung up on the maple, using an overhead anchor away from the wires etc, and then bombed the top 20 feet out, that was again leaning away from the wired, leaving a 50' stick and some limbs on the back side which will not touch touch the maple til the tree is almost 45º into the fall.

That is kinda of a long story, but the point is, watching this video and hearing mapleman's story about Guido at AS, has really reminded me and made a strong impression. There is no forgiveness in Electricity and it is probably the most danger to many experienced climbers in this work.

One little moment of forgetfulness around the juice and that could be the end of this or any life. One brain fart and it could all be over. If that video can serve to make me or anyone else here safer, then that is taking some terrible thing and making some good come of it. I think every climber should watch that man die, and let that be a lesson for all! There is no disrespect in that. It actually honors the sacrafice he made.
 

TheDan

New Member
[ QUOTE ]
I did eight years at florida power and light. They educated me in the dangers of power lines, and I have great respect for power lines, but not once did i see any one die in a video to teach me that. jm2c

[/ QUOTE ]

Aww, then you missed a lot of great stuff. I think stuff like this works, I gained a lot from the video and it was way shorter than 8 years.

Kudos to the poster for have the mind to post it.
 

easyphloem

Well-Known Member
[ QUOTE ]
That was a person being killed by a violent and powerful electric shock. He made a mistake, he was distracted, he doesnt deserved to be ridiculed or made fun of. I feel ill.

[/ QUOTE ]


In watching the video critically, I would say that the guy touched the primaries on purpose, to off himself. All of the people around before it happened seemed to be trying to get him off of the train roof.

I don't like what happened, but I think it is a stark reminder of how electricity will kill you dead. If someone watches that and doesn't take extra care when in the proximity of high voltage, this might not be the job for them.


SZ
 

adamj

Member
This video shows the reality of a direct contact with a good ground, very graphic to say the least. House drops/secondaries will kill you just as dead. As a line clearance foreman I have personally seen what power lines can do to trees and people. I carpool to work everyday with a elderly gent who had to remove a coworker from a tree after he got electrocuted from indirect contact with a primary. Unfortunately too many tree workers push it when it comes to power lines. The voltage dictates what safe working distances to keep for line clearance trimmers. Add 10 feet for everyone else. I also have to add ten feet to my normal minimum distances when not at work. For a 500kv transmission line thats 29feet minimum safe working distance,(a long freakin way from the lines!) The point I'm trying to make is if you haven't been trained don't do it, if you are unsure don't do it. We have enough inherent danger working aloft.
 
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