Battery Powered Chainsaw/Hedge Trimmer

macrocarpa

Active Member
I was ready to order the Husqvarna top handled battery powered chainsaw after watching the "climbing arborist" youtube channel. Treestuff then said they quit carrying them because they had too many issues with them. Stihl also makes a battery powered climbing saw. I would use it for pruning primarily. Is it worth the investment to buy the saw? (and hedge trimmers?) Which brand is best? Where to buy from? Thanks for the help!
 

Yimboob

Active Member
I love my husqvarna to be honest but I dont have the top handled. I also have the older batteries too, so the newer ones will make it better.

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colb

Well-Known Member
My milwaukee pole chain saw is awesome. I'm trying to figure out if there is a limit to the number of extensions I can add to it. The powerhead is a brushless 3 in one, so I can switch out the saw for hedge trimmers and for a weed whacker around the house. Milwaukee also makes a smaller hedger, a 16-inch ground saw that is really useful to me, and all those other tools (including the preeminent bracing rod drill - the M18 Superhawg). One battery, many tools.

Meanwhile, how is the battery tech of Stihl and Husqvarna? How is their brushless motor tech? Ever used a Stihl drill, or Husqvarna portable band saw?

The one issue I have left is that Milwaukee has not yet made a top handle saw. When that happens, my Echo 2511t will increasingly become endangered. If you get another tool lineup like Makita, you can get a solid top handle saw - choose between all three, with one having a brushless motor, but then you can't get a same-colored really big drill with a clutch like the superhawg.

The batteries and motors are driving this race increasingly more than traditional chainsaw design awareness.
 

ghostice

Well-Known Member
Husky e-TopHandles/ e-RearHandles - Baileys has 'em, your local Husky dealer will have 'em and Honey Brothers has 'em (though I don't think they can ship the bigger battteries by air and the chargers would be 220V as in the UK/ EU). Ours are still chuggin' for couple of years now - I'd be interested in exactly what kind of problems exactly - something concrete from them?
 

evo

Well-Known Member
I've been told that the batt hedgers are great compared to gas... more torque, less noise, and much lighter in pole hedger configs... I have my eyes on a M18 pole hedger, and would love to hear more about them... Only reason why I'm leaning towards a m18 is I already have the holehawg for the grcs with a few spare batteries..
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
Two Husky top handles for over two years, Husky extendable polesaw for about a year. Problems? Don't run them in the rain.

Watch some youtube videos on each brand. Go find a unit of each brand and run it.
 

Jan_

Well-Known Member
Makita makes a top handle saw, great thing is that you can also use their batteries with every other power tool imaginable. I think that (or the rear handle one) would be the one electric saw I'd buy, but I'm also not a work climber so I wouldn't be using it in a tree most of the time.
 

Ryan Keats

Active Member
I live in Vancouver and we have a husky top handle and a husky pole saw. I mentioned Vancouver because it rains here.. a lot. I have only had an issue with the saw not working once when it was absolutely pouring. Other than that, it’s been great. The ability to switch batteries between the saws is excellent.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Makita makes a top handle saw, great thing is that you can also use their batteries with every other power tool imaginable. I think that (or the rear handle one) would be the one electric saw I'd buy, but I'm also not a work climber so I wouldn't be using it in a tree most of the time.
Makita makes three different top handle saws. The big one is reportedly a little heavy (two batteries) and built with a brush motor. It is supposedly an excellent saw. The middle is brushless and gutless - I've used it to prune 4" white oak. But, it is also an awesome saw - absolutely light weight. The small one is fun - I've had it in hand, but maybe redundant with the middle saw for professionals... Makita clearly has the best top handle saw out of the major lithium tool lineups, but I expect one of them will make a larger brushless top handle saw soon. The tech is there.
 

macrocarpa

Active Member
I will look into the Makita saws to figure out which model would be best for climbing/pruning. Maybe they are not as expensive as the Husqvarna?
 

Merle Nelson

Well-Known Member
I live in Vancouver and we have a husky top handle and a husky pole saw. I mentioned Vancouver because it rains here.. a lot. I have only had an issue with the saw not working once when it was absolutely pouring. Other than that, it’s been great. The ability to switch batteries between the saws is excellent.
Ahh, maybe I stand corrected. Good to know.
 

colb

Well-Known Member
Awwh well now if it's simple inside I'm sold.. im all into that these days.. perfect for little prunes
It's really nice. I just had a hard time getting through 4" white oak. It was stopping in the kerf and I had to start it up a couple times. Be advised, lol. I really like it though.
 

macrocarpa

Active Member
It's really nice. I just had a hard time getting through 4" white oak. It was stopping in the kerf and I had to start it up a couple times. Be advised, lol. I really like it though.
If you had a hard time getting through 4 inch white oak that concerns me. The more powerful battery saws I’m sure weigh (and cost) much more than this little Makita which is between 7-8 pounds. I’ve also been looking at this little gas echo that claims to be the lightest climbing saw made but I really like the battery operated concept of no pulling, fumes, and less noise.
 

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Timber1972

Member
Has anybody used the battery powered top handled saws in the cold? Do they last at all? I am thinking they would be poor performance and longevity at -20 C but would love to hear I am wrong.

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colb

Well-Known Member
If you had a hard time getting through 4 inch white oak that concerns me. The more powerful battery saws I’m sure weigh (and cost) much more than this little Makita which is between 7-8 pounds. I’ve also been looking at this little gas echo that claims to be the lightest climbing saw made but I really like the battery operated concept of no pulling, fumes, and less noise.
Yeah, the 2511t is *really* nice. Get the clutch sprocket and panther narrow gauge bar combo from the UK shop that sells panther cs mill stuff. I bought an 8" bar. The proprietor let me know that a 14" bar is in the works so I am waiting to buy that as well. They have 12" in stock, but I want the 14".

I really did have a hard time lightening up on the cut to get through 4" white oak with the makita. But, I think if I used it more I would be fine? And, I still really like it. It is very small and so easy to haul around in the canopy - almost like it's not there. If you don't have somewhere to go by a certain time, it's a great saw.
 
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